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Since we are talking vintage aviation...

Discussion in 'The Antiquated' started by Roothawg, May 19, 2018.

  1. 61SuperMonza
    Joined: Nov 16, 2020
    Posts: 472

    61SuperMonza
    Member

    WOW!!!
    That is so sweet. The lines of a 195 are so flowing. The cowl is so beautiful with the blisters.
    POLISHED GOODNESS
    Thanks for the post
     
    41 GMC K-18 likes this.
  2. COCONUTS
    Joined: May 5, 2015
    Posts: 894

    COCONUTS

    I would see
    I would see these out on the flight line at Ft Eustis, VA, usually with a large tractor trailer box slung on the bottom. I believe that there was a person sitting behind the pilots section who control the level of the box, when it was raised or lowered. This A/C was 95% function and only 5% form.
     
    61SuperMonza and 41 GMC K-18 like this.
  3. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 1,476

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Back in the mid-70s when I was Boilermaking, we used a lifting service to set the two stainless steel halves of the 34 foot diameter rain shield on top of a 605 feet tall smokestack at the Portage, WI power plant. A Sky Crane came in to make the two lifts. The pilot set down and had a quick talk with the erection crew I was on. We were going to be on top of the stack landing the rain shield. I don't remember much of anything he said except for the part about
    " If anything goes wrong, there's a guillotine on the load line. The helicopter and I are my first priority. Sorry about your luck. " There were no pictures, sorry
     
  4. .........WOW!!
     
  5. 270ci
    Joined: May 17, 2010
    Posts: 389

    270ci
    Member

  6. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 1,476

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    This reply does have something to do with the P-38, so bear with me. I may have mentioned this before but, the first job I had when I got out of high school in 1962 was working at Cimarron Field, OK. The field is just southwest of Yukon and has since been renamed Clarence E. Page Airport in 1978. Mr. Page operated a WWII primary flight training school at Cimarron and another school at Mustang Field a little to the west in El Reno. Mr. Page was still running the operation when I went to work there. One of the four hangars had burned and a lot of the engines in that hangar that could be salvaged were pickled and stored outside under tarps. At one time, there were 1500 Allison V-1710's, both left and right hand rotation. The shop there at the field had a contract to rebuild these engines to power mud pumps for oil drilling rigs. One of my jobs was to run these rebuilt engines in for four hours on a test stand. There were every imaginable type of aircraft engine stored in the other three hangers. The reason I mention the Allison's is that at the far south end of the field, there was a P-38 just sitting and I sometimes would take my lunch down there, climb up into the cockpit and try to imagine what flying one of those machines would be like. If it sounds juvenile, it's probably because I graduated when I was just 17 and anything with horsepower and speed fascinated me. I tried everything I could to get Mr. Page to get this beautiful aircraft flying again. I know a lot of the guys in the shop would have worked on that restoration for free. I wish I knew but I don't have any idea what happened to the plane. Mr. Page did offer to sell me one of the many North American T-6's and Harvard's in a basket for only $2000 which was just about a year's pay at the time. Had I only had a little foresight, I could have saved one of them out of all that I smelted down and poured into little aluminum bricks. The following should be a link to the Cimarron Field and Mustang Field Museum.

    THE CIMARRON FIELD AND MUSTANG FIELD MUSEUM
     
  7. 270ci
    Joined: May 17, 2010
    Posts: 389

    270ci
    Member

    That's a great story about your experiences at Cimarron....and thanks for the link.
     
  8. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 1,476

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You're welcome. What is the name of the museum where you took the picture of the P-38? I hope it hasn't become a victim of this Covid pandemic.
     
    41 GMC K-18 and lothiandon1940 like this.
  9. That P-38 looks like it's in the Tillamook Air Museum in Tillamook, Oregon. The museum is in the only remaining WW II blimp hanger, and boy is it HUGE!!!
    My late brother-in-law was a p-38 pilot. He entered pilot training school at 19 years old and got assigned to a p-38 squadron when he was 20. Boy, was he in hog heaven! He LOVED that plane, even though he had two of them shot out from under him in the South Pacific. On one his downings he spent about 10 days in the jungle getting back to his base. Pretty heady stuff for a 20 year old, and those 'kids' grew up quick!
    When he was in his mid 80's, one of his sons arranged a flight in a restored P-38 for him, and he even managed to fit into his WW II flight jacket, which my sister still has. RIP, Wayne, I've got your training picture on my office wall.
     
    COCONUTS, tractorguy, EL MOE and 3 others like this.
  10. 270ci
    Joined: May 17, 2010
    Posts: 389

    270ci
    Member

    28phonebooth is right on. I took that pic quite a few years ago on a cruise with some guys from the Inliners club.
    Hopefully they're still operating and still have the P-38.
     
  11. 41 GMC K-18
    Joined: Jun 27, 2019
    Posts: 1,406

    41 GMC K-18
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    That photograph was taken at the Tillamook Air Museum, in Tillamook Oregon. If you look that up, you will see that the building is one of the last huge giant blimp hangars.
     
    tractorguy, alanp561 and 270ci like this.
  12. i.rant
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 3,114

    i.rant
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    1. 1940 Ford

    Just found this thread. I’d like to share some photos of a few of the air shows/displays and fly ins I’ve attended. 2DD21DAE-3F3F-4BE4-85CE-F2C5A304C020.jpeg B0E4A5A7-F590-4658-857F-7D68C6EDF2E5.jpeg 8115C2B8-B04C-4FB6-B7A9-827B3F5FE740.jpeg CFAF0EBC-B18C-44ED-BB15-010226644D89.jpeg B8DC93FF-E96C-4CD1-BF2E-45AA13E05C86.jpeg BBF7D965-5C8B-414A-8962-FA266DE7E087.jpeg D55E242C-6C2C-4ABE-8A29-759A8A3D213D.jpeg F4C0FD35-97EC-496D-8895-F91920449F67.jpeg 027502E6-2BA0-4D60-A5F5-18877AF448B0.jpeg 4C2733D4-BB39-4C46-8771-FAAF7E4DAC99.jpeg 88B154AC-6B00-4317-BCF7-91D6A055AC2D.jpeg 1980E162-A759-4837-86B5-195488EF2BFD.jpeg FB96F8AD-BCBB-400C-A2F5-F47BB854DDEE.jpeg
     
  13. i.rant
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 3,114

    i.rant
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    1. 1940 Ford

    A few from a car show/ fly in at the Joliet regional airport a few years ago. The planes are the stars, many “hot rods” of the sky. 57298183-3520-4AEE-A4AC-A6CC09FC2902.jpeg 833AB5F1-4CD2-4F13-B821-5DDFBE696198.jpeg 9FF7A88E-DAB2-4DE0-886C-33A3D915B59F.jpeg 8F3D25FC-91EB-4B6A-BD00-A23F1476FD83.jpeg B7A40A6C-C7E7-4EDF-AA19-4B21E500E08C.jpeg 14FC7454-BD95-4BA2-AFD6-452B7C3A3D30.jpeg 5BB597A8-2BD5-45F8-AC21-6FEAC77F1FDD.jpeg C21E964C-90C0-409F-8966-DEA5DB1E8C8B.jpeg BD40CCA4-F7DE-429C-848C-F6B1E9BF847C.jpeg D97295AF-E0EA-4E16-8FB4-B1CC851884E3.jpeg DACEEEBB-E442-43E8-B13F-21956DD8DD66.jpeg E7D41A10-1A2E-4DD9-9E54-920E8AC7882E.jpeg 3FDB0C42-9435-4947-9B41-586CED17BD66.jpeg E323C0E9-1E9A-4EBA-BB94-C4E2D28595DB.jpeg 663A8A43-AF73-45F1-A969-73FF2DB43FA6.jpeg 8D0BFF43-C5A6-4110-83EF-ECBBE32B9534.jpeg 8BFAFE78-1255-4C5A-8996-6A17F943EFFC.jpeg 2649401B-3BEC-4F4E-8278-9186AB7BFB26.jpeg E55F86DA-604B-4EC4-BBCC-960B5CD5DC40.jpeg 1ACD9DE7-81D3-4641-B466-D99BA0110717.jpeg 9BAA0BDA-5D55-4B16-894C-10E2A8959CCA.jpeg
     
  14. 41 GMC K-18
    Joined: Jun 27, 2019
    Posts: 1,406

    41 GMC K-18
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    @Belle53
    I found this video purely by chance, its very informative about how this WACO was originally registered as CF-BB-Q in Canada. So I stand fully corrected and better educated about the facts on this plane. Gary had never mentioned about the Canadian registration, he only mentioned the element of the hog pen.
    Thanks
    Dennis.

     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021
    tractorguy likes this.
  15. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 8,331

    jimmy six
    Member

    Guess you've never been to Tustin, Ca.
     
  16. COCONUTS
    Joined: May 5, 2015
    Posts: 894

    COCONUTS

    There should of been a 8 inch wide walk way (like a plank made out of alum) going down the center of the bomb bay. This was attached to the bulkheads just below the hatch. This was use to get back and forth of the A/C. Often times when all the bombs did not release over target, someone had to go into the bomb bay standing on the center plank, bomb bay doors open and kick the bombs until they loosen up and drop from the aircraft. Now I know all you all are thinking that we have here a B-17 aircrew member, no just saw it on 12:00 High.
     
    41 GMC K-18, alanp561 and i.rant like this.

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