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Sheet metal wood buck thread.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by iwanaflattie, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. mattarellano83
    Joined: Feb 20, 2014
    Posts: 1

    mattarellano83
    Member
    from renton,wa

    how did you get it to roll up with out creases or relief cuts please e-mail me at impala_ss_64_1999@yahoo.com
     
  2. Great thread! I love learning about this kind of fab.

    Steve
     
  3. I don't get it.
    This a thread about shaping metal.
    Why would he email you and not post it here for us ALL to learn.
    :confused::confused::confused:
     
    dos zetas likes this.
  4. fordcragar
    Joined: Dec 28, 2005
    Posts: 3,180

    fordcragar
    Member
    from Yakima WA.

    What he used, or what is shown in the picture, is a hammer form; which he clamps the sheet between two pieces of plywood. The hammer form can give you the radius that will allow you form the metal to. By hammering the piece, you can actually stretch (as required) and shrink (any puckers) to get the shape and feature into the part without cutting and welding. After you let the part loose from the hammer form, any final shaping and planishing can take place then.
     
  5. go-twichy
    Joined: Jul 22, 2010
    Posts: 1,652

    go-twichy
    BANNED

    great metal work going on here, and some pretty nice woodwork to!
     
  6. rytang
    Joined: Jun 29, 2016
    Posts: 429

    rytang
    Member
    from Arizona

    This is great. Do you, or anyone else have any more info on this? This is the next step in my build and I'd like to build splash pan like this.
     
  7. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,645

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    rytang, there's a bunch of threads on making, and using a hammerform here, just do a search. I did one many yeas ago on making a splash pan, and also on my build thread for my 47 Chevy, how to change the front wheel well openings using one.
     
  8. rytang
    Joined: Jun 29, 2016
    Posts: 429

    rytang
    Member
    from Arizona

    Thanks! I am new here... I'm not sure how to do things yet. I went to your profile but couldn't find any build threads. I'd love to read your build on those fenders... Also... Did you build the kopper kart?? Please tell me I can read that!! I'm building a 60s style show car now and I'd read anything you suggest!!
     
  9. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,645

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/47-chevy-custom-build-thread.933720/

    Just go to the 'magnifying glass' icon on the top left side of the forum pages, click on it to open the search. You can search by title, or member name, to find things. Yes, the Kart was built in my backyard shop, by myself, the owner, and a great group of friends. Been doing Kustoms for over 35 years. Learned from an old timer who was the best around in my area. I've got a bunch of stuff on Facebook, less on my website (hard to figure out how to do things on it!) Customs by Flash. While not strickly how-to's, anyone who knows basics can learn some cool things, and some tricks to doing custom work.
     
  10. shortypu
    Joined: Dec 22, 2010
    Posts: 136

    shortypu
    Member

  11. Jimmy B
    Joined: May 4, 2004
    Posts: 5,678

    Jimmy B
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The time I built a '24 Chev body. I had to sell the panels but still have the bucks.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2016
  12. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,645

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    Very sturdy looking buck there, Jimmy B! So you could do your hammering right on it?
     
  13. Jimmy B
    Joined: May 4, 2004
    Posts: 5,678

    Jimmy B
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yes, I made it stronger so it could withstand some heavy blows, I was inspired by how Italian coach builders built body bucks.
    LETS SEE IF I CAN BUILD A ROADSTER BODY!
     
    dos zetas likes this.
  14. rytang
    Joined: Jun 29, 2016
    Posts: 429

    rytang
    Member
    from Arizona

    Thanks for the link to your Chevy. I'm going to read it now. Do you have a link for your Kart? I'd love to read about that.
     
  15. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,645

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    The Kart I did not do a whole build thread here on the HAMB. It took place over so long a time, I just posted tidbits, a few how-to's (chopping the top, doing lead work on the bed, making air cleaners for the Vette 6) and updates. I do have a pretty good timeline on the build on my Facebook page, just go to Photos, then to Albums, and there's one for the Kart there.
     
  16. What gauge steel are you using to make these panels?
     
  17. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 6,113

    oj
    Member

    18ga cold rolled steel is the norm.
    I'd like to point out a couple different techniques are being mixed together in this thread. A 'wooden buck' is created to test the panel for fit. It isn't used to beat on, you'd check the fit and make adjustments on the wheel or another machine. DSC00198.JPG DSC00192.JPG DSC00200.JPG
    A hammer form is more durable, it can be made from a wireframe and covered in epoxy to copy a piece. If durable enough you can hammer direct on it and it should last to make many copies. For example I have 1/2" thick steel plates cut in sets of different radius', if I need to make like a fender lip I clamp steel between them and beat it into submission. Thats why its' called a 'Hammer Form.'
    A third techique is called flow forming, similar to hammer form but you use a pnuematic hammer and a form to clamp the metal in. The 1st picture is the form, this form has changeable pieces to change the size. The clamps have to be stout so the metal will be stretched.
    The 2nd pic shows the form taking shape and the CP rivet gun (best to use because it has precise control of the hammer) with a plastic head.
    The 3rd picture shows the finished floor pan with the 3 different sized features. The form itself is undamaged and able to whip out another set of pans. This is called 'Flow Forming'
     
    stealthcruiser and Dino64 like this.
  18. stealthcruiser
    Joined: Dec 24, 2002
    Posts: 3,719

    stealthcruiser
    Member

    Done a bit of "flow forming", making aircraft parts, and working in a drop hammer shop.
    All in " O " Aluminum.
     
  19. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 6,113

    oj
    Member

    Drop Hammer is a technique we don't see here, can you explain and maybe a picture or two?
     
  20. stealthcruiser
    Joined: Dec 24, 2002
    Posts: 3,719

    stealthcruiser
    Member

    We had a hammer this size, ( the green one), and a smaller model.
    https://www.google.com.ec/search?q=chambersburg+ceco+drop+hammer&biw=1093&bih=506&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi6ibLXxJHOAhWLKh4KHQmMAEQQ_AUIBigB#imgrc=U0DKk36Hv7dZ4M:

    We would pattern off of the part we wished to reproduce, and use said patterns to make a male and female dies, from a material called "Kirksite", allowing for the thickness of the metal.

    Parts made this way out of " O " temper Aluminum, A-286 stainless,and annealed and commercially pure Titanium.

    Parts heat treated after forming.

    Don't have any personal pics from work.

    Edit: we used "pattern wax" to simulate the metal thickness.
     

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