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Projects Scratch built Crosley Special

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by 1952B3b23, Jan 5, 2019.

  1. Rolleiflex
    Joined: Oct 25, 2007
    Posts: 825

    Rolleiflex
    Member

    Great stuff, thanks for sharing! Can't wait to see it keep progressing.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  2. Thousands of sbc, sbf, fe, rat block, flathead, Mopar hemi, inline 6, stovebolt 6, bangers, nailheads, rockets, caddies, V-12 flatties, Packard 6 and 8, Mopar flathead inlines, etc. that have been innovatively tweaked, beefed, bamboozled and blown on this H.A.M.B., but we all go absolutely nutz for a doubled up Crosley. Oh, yeah, we appreciate the rhythm of marching to a different drum! MORE of this.
     
  3. thegearhead
    Joined: Nov 23, 2015
    Posts: 21

    thegearhead
    Member

    Yankee-Crosley-Parts is another good source for parts If not listed give Ted a call he'll probably have it.
    Looking good! I'm building a Crosley but nothing like your's lol. 49438969_641609232922067_8201325538741059584_n.jpg
     
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  4. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 9,960

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    High levels of creativity coupled with superb workmanship always garners lots of admiring attention!
     
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  5. That's pure inginuity & artwork... truly amazing, bravo to both you guys...
     
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  6. 6sally6
    Joined: Feb 16, 2014
    Posts: 270

    6sally6
    Member

    For the sake of argument let's ass-ume both engines make identical HP and torque. The HP would be the same as a single engine. BUT two should yield twice the torque....right?! To use the increased torque you could "gear-it-up" to move faster because of the added torque. Sorta like comparing a 450 HP SBF.....and a 450 BBF. Big block is gonna have more torque and can "pull" a taller gear.
    Am I on the right track here?!
    6sally6
     
  7. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 9,406

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    OK Lets think about how we calculate horse power. We multiply torque times RPMs. Then divide by 5252 and get Horse power So, how can we double the torque numbers without doubling the HP?
     
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  8. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 9,960

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    Rich Fox, in his post #97 above, provides a succinct and mathematically correct answer.

    But think about this....if each cylinder produces a certain amount of power, how could eight identical cylinders NOT produce more horsepower than only four? If your rationale were true, an engine would only produce the same total horsepower as one cylinder produced, no matter how many cylinders were added.

    Even more basic......two live horses harnessed together to pull a load will provide twice the horsepower as only one of them would have provided.
     
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  9. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 9,406

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    PS For those of you who read dyno charts and don't already know. The 5252 number is a constant and is why the torque and HP graph always crosses at 5252 RPM
     
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  10. Al Peckenpaugh
    Joined: Mar 30, 2018
    Posts: 5

    Al Peckenpaugh

    What an inspiration! Beautiful work! Craftsmanship deluxe! Love the Crosley, of course. Ours can be seen to the left.....
     
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  11. drtrcrV-8
    Joined: Jan 6, 2013
    Posts: 961

    drtrcrV-8
    Member

  12. 28dreyer
    Joined: Jan 23, 2008
    Posts: 1,050

    28dreyer
    Member
    from Minnesota

    Well in addition to the straight 8 and V8’s shown here, there is a DOHC 4 at the Speedway Museum.

    It was built by Jan Gilmer in Minnesota and very successfully raced in a TQ midget I believe in the 70’s or 60’s.
     
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  13. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 6,342

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    Some people just have too much talent, damn I'd love to have that skillset. I love it and can't wait to see your contribution. Don't forget to post more photos, did I mention that we love photos! ;)
     
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  14. drtrcrV-8
    Joined: Jan 6, 2013
    Posts: 961

    drtrcrV-8
    Member

  15. fourspd2quad
    Joined: Jul 6, 2006
    Posts: 529

    fourspd2quad
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    This kicks Badasse's ass!
     
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  16. I finally got a chance to work on the Crosley again. I started working on the left side tail piece. It’s still very rough and needs a ton of work. This panel is a preliminary piece so I can see if I like the shape of the tail. It’s not always easy to get a feel for how the wireform is flowing but once you put sheet metal on it all the bugaboos jump out. Once I’m happy with it I’ll make a Flexible Shape Pattern (FSP) of it. That will allow me to shape the final panel and the right half much faster than reading the wires. The FSP might not make much sense now but I’ll explain/show when the time comes.

    On a side note, I bought a new English wheel from Wray Schelin (Pro Shaper Sheet Metal). He builds top notch metal shaping tools right at his shop in Charlton MA. I’m so happy to finally have one of these, it’s been a long time coming.

    Thanks for looking.

    Chris
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]


    Instagram: @39_deluxe
     
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  17. jimdillon
    Joined: Dec 6, 2005
    Posts: 2,605

    jimdillon
    Member

    Chris, have been lurking on your thread with a pretty big smile. When I was 11 my grandfather bought me a Crosley with a homemade boattail body-crude in some respects for sure but cool for a young kid nevertheless. Still have it and great memories of driving it at my grandfather's place of business in 62-66ish. It was like a small racetrack and one time my brother took a turn too fast and damaged the tail when he hit a roadgrader tire. We fashioned a piece on the back and voila it became a bob tail I suppose. The car you are building is flat out cool IMO. Love your english wheel as well. I worked for 5 months with Ron Fournier and since then have really appreciated wheeling and the guys that do it. Keep up the good work. Jim

    Here is me with my grandfather on the day when he taught me to drive a 3 speed manual-still remember the thrill. Crosley-5.jpg
     
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  18. haychrishay
    Joined: Jul 23, 2008
    Posts: 939

    haychrishay
    Member

    This is gonna be cool!
     
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  19. That’s fantastic! Thank you for sharing the story and picture. I can only imagine how thrilled you were to race around in that thing.

    Ron Fournier was quite the craftsman. That’s nice that you got to work with him for that long. I’m sure you learned a ton. Do you still do metal shaping ? It’s really a huge passion for me. It’s a big challenge but extremely rewarding as you see yourself progress and get better. I’m always trying to advance my skills and get better and better. Thanks for the interest.

    Chris


    Instagram: @39_deluxe
     
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  20. jimdillon
    Joined: Dec 6, 2005
    Posts: 2,605

    jimdillon
    Member

    Chris, it was great working with Ron and we were friends up to his passing. For most of the 5 months. I had my own work to do on the car we were doing so I did not get to do metal work all day long but a bit to have an appreciation for it. At the time he was also building his little V6 hot rod/track style car and I painted his chrome moly chassis and helped hold the large panels when he wheeled them. All aluminum and he would remove the protective covering while wheeling and then put it back on afterwards-awesome work for sure. It makes you up your game on whatever you do. I have the equipment to an extent but do not do as much shaping as I did in the 80s. I had a really great english wheel I made with parts I bought from Ron but sold it when money was tight-still have another jack sleeve and three anvil wheels and a large upper wheel I bought from Ron. Still have my planishing hammer and deep throat shrinker that I bought thru him in the 80s. In the real near future I have to fabricate some fenders for a 1903 Cadillac but they are not too complex but still fun all in all. Your work looks great-keep up the good work. Jim
     
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  21. Desmodromic
    Joined: Sep 25, 2010
    Posts: 157

    Desmodromic
    Member

    Jimdillon - Love your Crosley special; sort of a scaled down domestic version of the contemporary Lotus 7. You didn't mention that the transmission was non-synchromesh, quite an accomplishment for an 11 year old to master. Is it still operational? A restoration on the "to do" list?
     
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  22. jimdillon
    Joined: Dec 6, 2005
    Posts: 2,605

    jimdillon
    Member

    It is non-operational and on a long list but no big deal. The car puts a smile on my face every time I see it. My grandfather was a collector and I drove quite a few cars with no synchros when I was a kid but luckily the Crosley special had a pretty smooth 3 speed manual. My dad had a 23 Stutz with a trans axle and 5 foot long shifting rods and no synchros and although it was anything but a joy to drive, I even drove it to work when I was 16. With 2 wheel mechanical brakes it made panic stops a real joy (especially when it was almost impossible to downshift on a panic stop).

    Here is a picture of it a few years ago with my dogs checking it out when I brought it home from being in cheap storage-you can see the boat tail is only a memory. 50805 001.JPG
     
  23. Desmodromic
    Joined: Sep 25, 2010
    Posts: 157

    Desmodromic
    Member

    Several Italian mfrs of small sports/racers in the early 50s used Crosley engines, some of which had DOHC valve arrangements. Since the factory Crosleys had integral heads, these engines also had special cylinder blocks that bolted to the Crosley crankcase.
     
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  24. toreadorxlt
    Joined: Feb 27, 2008
    Posts: 732

    toreadorxlt
    Member
    from Nashua, NH

    looks great. Bob is a hell of a guy.
     
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  25. Very cool. Maybe one day you can get it running. I bet it would still be a blast to scoot around in.


    Instagram: @39_deluxe
     
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  26. Thanks. Yeah he is. I’m glad I can call him a friend.

    Chris


    Instagram: @39_deluxe
     
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