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Technical Remove the drain plug without losing oil.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Raunchy, Aug 5, 2017.

  1. Raunchy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2007
    Posts: 275

    Raunchy
    Member

    After doing a cam job on my 327 SBC. I drained the break in oil to add new oil with a little ZZDP and a new filter. I had wanted to add a magnetic plug for a little piece of mind. I looked everywhere in the shop , cause I thought I had one. Couldn't find it. It was 3 in the morning but I wanted to drive the Roadster the next day to work. So I put the old plug back in and topped it off with the aforementioned oil. I was telling a guy at work about it and he said when he was working for Ford they ran a plastic plug on one of their diesels and it always leaked. The way they changed it was put a shop vac on the oil fill and secure it . Turn it on and change the plug and it would slurp air but never lose a bit of oil. Well I bought my plug and went home and put my shop vac on the oil fill tube on my SBC at the front of the intake. I had a reducer that fit in it perfect. turned it on and had a friend watch the hose. But it could be secured with duct tape ,etc. if you are doing it alone. Got my new plug with thread sealer and pulled the plug. Not a drop of oil came out you could look in the hole and see the oil as it slurped gulps of air through the drain hole. put the new plug in and tightened it up. Shut down the vac and checked the shop vac hose. There wasn't a drop of oil in it. Hope somebody else can use this little trick if need be. Happy Motoring!
     
  2. Who woulda thunk...... Good trick.
     
  3. 56premiere
    Joined: Mar 8, 2011
    Posts: 1,178

    56premiere
    Member
    from oregon

    Well done! new tricks are still learned
     
    lothiandon1940 likes this.
  4. Ha! tricky for sure. Great tip.
     
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  5. That might work for the first 100 people who tried it but, I would personally wind up with a shop vac full of 5 quarts of oil. I know how my luck works!:eek:
     
    Rolleiflex, crminal, jazz1 and 22 others like this.
  6. Montana1
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 999

    Montana1
    Member
    from Colorado

    About that time the power would serge or someone would trip over the cord! :mad::eek::D:D
     
  7. I've never had occasion to do this, but I'm certain it would work. Though I'd only try it with fresh oil or make absolutely sure that there was no fuel contamination in the crankcase. Sucking fuel vapors thru a shop vac could produce a sort of flame thrower effect. :oops:
     
  8. slowmotion
    Joined: Nov 21, 2011
    Posts: 2,426

    slowmotion
    Member

    Dogone physics, who'da thunk it?!
     
    Woogeroo and lothiandon1940 like this.
  9. chargin03
    Joined: Jan 8, 2013
    Posts: 223

    chargin03
    Member

  10. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 4,309

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Excellent! I have done similar to suck sealer into a leaky gasket, in fact now that you mention it I should do that on the rear intake of my SBC.
     
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  11. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 21,338

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    That's how my luck runs. I'd be the guys who has a hidden air leak in the crankcase or a bad pcv valve that lets air flow in and oil flow out vacuum or no vacuum. Still beats holding your thumb over the hole while swapping plug gaskets with the other hand and trying to get it back together though and I've done that a time or two.
     
    lothiandon1940 likes this.
  12. Blues4U
    Joined: Oct 1, 2015
    Posts: 1,620

    Blues4U
    Member
    from So Cal

    Used to pull a vacuum on hydraulic tanks all the time to change out hoses, o-rings, maybe a pump even. But never used a shop vac, LOL! Snap On and Mac and the others all make a venturi style vacuum pump that works off of shop air, plug shop air in at one end and you get a vacuum source on the other end. But I've never done it on an engine, engines have other holes to draw air in from. I'm surprised you didn't have to plug up the pcv and/or breather to do this.
     
  13. Raunchy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2007
    Posts: 275

    Raunchy
    Member

    A friend of mine who was a field mechanic said they used the engine vacuum and a long hose with an adapter from the service truck to change hydraulic filters on a piece of equipment. Hooked it into the tank and restricted the vent on the tank a little. He told about it when I told him this story.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
    F&J and Montana1 like this.
  14. olscrounger
    Joined: Feb 23, 2008
    Posts: 2,678

    olscrounger
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    very neat idea--would have never thought that would work. Thx
     
    lothiandon1940 likes this.
  15. Algoma56
    Joined: Jan 18, 2006
    Posts: 877

    Algoma56
    Member

    Read a similar tip like that for sealing up an engine. With no oil in the pan, run vacuum, and listen for "whistle leaks". Hit those with a dab of silicone, the vacuum helps pull the silicone into the void, and later the engine is sealed up tight.
    Thanks for the tip ,and reminder.
     
    48fordnut and junk yard kid like this.
  16. Put your finger over the end of your straw.
     
  17. Bandit Billy
    Joined: Sep 16, 2014
    Posts: 1,934

    Bandit Billy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Washington

    This would have made a good...wait for it...
     
  18. Bandit Billy
    Joined: Sep 16, 2014
    Posts: 1,934

    Bandit Billy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Washington

  19. Don't try it with the valve covers off. :eek:
     
    lothiandon1940 likes this.
  20. Thumb, quick moves will come close, but this is a good idea if you have a shop vac.
     
  21. Clik
    Joined: Jul 1, 2009
    Posts: 1,602

    Clik
    Member

    I would have just stuck a strong magnet on the outside of the plug.
     
  22. robracer1
    Joined: Aug 3, 2015
    Posts: 216

    robracer1
    Member

    Back in the 50s and 60s if you used Quaker State oil and took the drain plug out, oil would not drain out till you got a screw driver and poked it in the oil pan hole, then it was good luck to get it all out. I'm not kidding worked at a gas station as a kid, saw it many times.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
  23. I believe that. Waxy oil, never liked it. I would imagine every engine using that stuff had more gunk than you could imagine.
     
  24. flatheadpete
    Joined: Oct 29, 2003
    Posts: 8,638

    flatheadpete
    Member
    from Burton, MI

    Hold mah beer...Imma gonna try sumpthin'!
    I'll be damned. It worked!
    Great tip. Thanks.
     
  25. Engine man
    Joined: Jan 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,003

    Engine man
    Member
    from Wisconsin

    We used a shop vac all the time on hydraulic systems. The only problem is the hoses are prone to collapse under full vacuum. I made an adapter to use a smaller hydraulic suction hose instead.

    The same trick is used to pull electrical wire through conduit. Tie a piece of cloth or paper towel to a nylon string, suck it through the conduit instead of trying to push a fish tape through it then connect the wires to the string or a larger rope for larger wires. You can pull different strings for circuits that branch off the main line.
     
  26. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 4,309

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    "And then she plugged in her new hair dryer.."

    Seriously, great ideas in this thread.

    I've had my Flowbee hooked to a dedicated shop vac for quite awhile.
     
    Flatblack 31 likes this.
  27. slack
    Joined: Aug 18, 2014
    Posts: 443

    slack
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'll go you one better. I bought a Nova with an I6 from that same little old lady that "only drove it to church on Sunday" and "never run anything but Quaker State." When I removed the valve cover (I shit you not) the crud had formed to it like a jello mold :confused:! I went in the house and got a tablespoon and a teaspoon to commence excavating. Never seen anything like it before or since (never ran Quaker State either.) :rolleyes: Jeebus.
     
  28. robracer1
    Joined: Aug 3, 2015
    Posts: 216

    robracer1
    Member

    I have seen the same thing I don't know how they stayed in business?
     
  29. floored
    Joined: Apr 11, 2007
    Posts: 455

    floored
    Member

    In '86 we bought my wife a new car, dealer told us they had a special deal with Quaker State have us change your oil every 3k miles and the engine is warranted for as long as you own it. At 80k it had blowby so bad you couldn't keep the dipstick in it, and the dealer was out of business!
    Now to keep this on topic, that's an incredible idea with the vac, but I know what would happen if I tried!
    Ron
     
    lothiandon1940 likes this.
  30. no55mad
    Joined: Dec 15, 2006
    Posts: 1,657

    no55mad
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from nipomo, ca

    Now there are some of Dutch decent that just pull the plug, put your finger over the drain hole, position the new plug and install. The spilled oil can be mostly captured in an old clean cottage cheese container and reinstalled - just sayin. My daughter recently sent me a text and said she took my 10 yr old grandson to a museum that had old planes and some had drip pans. My grandson said 'this place smells like grandpa' - hmm.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
    harpo1313, '51 Norm and slack like this.

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