Register now to get rid of these ads!

Technical Remote battery wiring questions

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by radarsonwheels, Nov 4, 2018.

  1. radarsonwheels
    Joined: Dec 15, 2006
    Posts: 191

    radarsonwheels
    Member
    from Philly

    Howdy!

    I’m running a battery way in the back of my ‘54 dodge truck project. The starter has an internal solenoid so I ran 1/0 gauge wire straight to the fat post on the starter.

    In the past with remote batteries I’ve stacked a bunch of stuff either on the starter stud with the +12 battery feed or stacked it on the battery stud on external ford style starter solenoids on the inner fender or firewall.

    On this motor with this brand new starter the stud is pretty short (originally had an extension bracket for some other stock application) so I can’t add a charging wire from the alternator, or ring terminals for an ignition box or a feed for the fuse box under the dash.

    I’m thinking about making a remote stud or bolt terminal to use as a +12v hub for all my underhood wiring. I am thinking maybe fabricating it from hardwood or maybe a hockey puck? Only if I can make it look 1/2 decent...

    Anybody do one of these that isn’t horrible looking or billet or high tech plastic off of some kid’s honda with the licence plate rattling from all his amps? I’m going with tidy, safe, and easy to work on with nice (not plastic corrugated or split) looms. So a raw mechanical or even vintage look would be cool.

    Thanks in advance for any pics or suggestions!

    Radar
     
  2. loudbang and juan motime like this.
  3. F&J
    Joined: Apr 5, 2007
    Posts: 13,217

    F&J
    Member

    you could make the starter stud "longer" by using one of those very long nuts.. I don't know the name, but it would be 1-1/4 long, threaded all the way through. Tighten that to hold the battery cable to the starter, then use a short stud in the outer threads to add all your feeds.

    on the remote firewall terminal block idea, I know I've seen something like that in my long ago truck mechanic past. It was black bakelite with one stud. There must be something made out there, perhaps industrial supply?

    .
     
  4. Ask for a 'Threaded rod coupler' in the appropriate size. I will caution you, if it's a 7/16" stud, they don't make that size.
     
    loudbang likes this.
    Register now to get rid of these ads!

  5. 24riverview
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 814

    24riverview
    Member

  6. evintho
    Joined: May 28, 2007
    Posts: 1,271

    evintho
    Member

  7. miker98038
    Joined: Jan 24, 2011
    Posts: 428

    miker98038
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

  8. Joe H
    Joined: Feb 10, 2008
    Posts: 794

    Joe H
    Member

    Just google battery stud, they are used all the time on buses and trucks. search
     
  9. radarsonwheels
    Joined: Dec 15, 2006
    Posts: 191

    radarsonwheels
    Member
    from Philly

    Unfortunately there’s no room above the starter lug. All great ideas above- thanks!
     
  10. Kerrynzl
    Joined: Jun 20, 2010
    Posts: 2,284

    Kerrynzl
    Member

    why don't you add a battery disconnect inline somewhere [Master Key] and hang all your accessories off that.

    Fix the problem and improve the safety at the same time

    hla-002843011_oh.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2018
  11. Ya know, I had a '78 Dodge PU once. [ wish I still had that one ]. I believe it had a jct block mounted on the driver side inner fender.

    Ben
     
  12. mountainman2
    Joined: Sep 16, 2013
    Posts: 311

    mountainman2
    Member

    I got a block very similar to this from a '96 S-10 Blazer at the U-pull-it for $2.
     
  13. GeezersP15
    Joined: Dec 4, 2011
    Posts: 542

    GeezersP15
    Member
    from N.E. PA

    [​IMG]Maybe something like this would work for you?
     
    olscrounger likes this.
  14. pirate
    Joined: Jun 29, 2006
    Posts: 397

    pirate
    Member
    from Alabama

    If you look on Amazon under Blue Seas Systems, Common Busbars they have a variety of bus bars from 150 to 250 amp. I used three for a grounding system on a tube fame sports car I built with a fiberglass body. They are used mostly for boats but are good quality and a safe and secure ways of supplying power.
    upload_2018-11-5_9-38-52.jpeg
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2020 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.