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Projects Reintroduction / engine questions

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by heritic88, Dec 1, 2016.

  1. heritic88
    Joined: Sep 7, 2008
    Posts: 116

    heritic88
    Member

    Hey guys I have been away from the H.A.M.B. For a couple of years and have rediscovered it in all of its awesome glory. I am writing in to reintroduce myself to the crowd and show off some things I have since done to my car. I have a 1951 Chevy Styleline Sport Coupe Deluxe. It has been bagged all the way around, mild shave work on some trim and handles, custom flat and flaked paint job courtesy of some HOK Majick Blue, and a custom interior that I did over last winter. It's currently running with a SBC 350 that is starting to get a bit worn, the usual smoking on start up and oil leak issues that they are prone to. So far since I have owned this car everything that has been done on it has been done by me and a few buddies and I would like to keep it that way. I plan on pulling the motor this winter and rebuilding it, now I have read some threads, watched some videos, and read through some guide books. My question is, where have some of you guys started with your first engine build? I'm not shy about trying anything with an engine just wouldn't mind some guidance.

    Thanks in advance;

    Scott

    P.s. Here are some pictures I would dig any feed back. [​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG]


    If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer, and if then you don't succeed, get a beer.
     
  2. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 48,682

    squirrel
    Member

    I started at age 14, read some magazine articles and shop manuals, and dove in....61 Chevy 283. It ran pretty good when I was done.
     
    falcongeorge likes this.
  3. Buy "How To Rebuild Your Small Block Chevy"... read through it once on the shitter, and then get to it. The book is virtually a step-by-step
     
  4. What Flingdingo said-That book covers everything you will encounter with an early SBC.
    I started with a 283, rebuilt it as per the book (and the original shop manual helps too), it ran sweet and for many years. After all, it's only a motor.
    Nice coupe too ,dig the interior.
     

  5. heritic88
    Joined: Sep 7, 2008
    Posts: 116

    heritic88
    Member

    Thanks that's actually the book I got glad I made the right choice.


    If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer, and if then you don't succeed, get a beer.
     
  6. heritic88
    Joined: Sep 7, 2008
    Posts: 116

    heritic88
    Member

    Also thanks about the interior I am pretty happy with it too. It turned out pretty good for a chump who bought a sewing machine.


    If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer, and if then you don't succeed, get a beer.
     
  7. What do you want the small block to do? That is the defining factor. if it is just a stock rebuild then just screw it together.

    Like squirrel my first small block was a 283,it was out of a wrecked '62 Belaire. Nothing major, one 4, new cam and higher compression pistons.

    Anyway what gets done to your 350 is dependent on what you expect it to do.
     
  8. heritic88
    Joined: Sep 7, 2008
    Posts: 116

    heritic88
    Member

    It's got a mild cam in it now it performs alright never hurts to have more power though.


    If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer, and if then you don't succeed, get a beer.
     
  9. X3 on that book... covers about everything , follow it and you will be good

    if the valve guides are worn don't knurl them , have new valve guides installed. have hardened exhaust seats installed if the heads are pre `74. use a new Cloyes double roller chain timing set , and a new Melling oil pump . if the cylinders have any taper at all bore to the next size and use new pistons. measure the crankshaft accurately for size and roundness to see if it's usable as is or needs to be ground undersize

    take you time , ask questions if in doubt
     
  10. Actually the saying when it comes to motors is if you blow it with a sing four, rebuild it with two. if it blows again huff it and if it still doesn't stay together inject it.

    Actually about 4 or 5 years ago I proved that you can have too much power. The raven was running my 400 horse motor in his '27 on old 7.00x15s. I had it dialed back so that he could hook it and he insisted that he needed more power. He had been running low to mid 12s. So I set it on kill and when he nailed it, it over powered his tires, he spun them the length of the track and ran a high 13. LOL

    For street motor that you intend to drive keep your compression down around 9-9.5:1 static with iron heads or as much as 11:1 with aluminum heads, an L-79 cam with your preload a little on the loose side and a single 4 on a good dual plane intake. You will be able to drive it every day and it will pull you when you need it to pull.
     
  11. heritic88
    Joined: Sep 7, 2008
    Posts: 116

    heritic88
    Member

    Great advice thanks! I guess my starting point will be a compression test then rip it out and tear it down.


    If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer, and if then you don't succeed, get a beer.
     
  12. You description sounds like bad guides or seals. That is more just a rework on the heads than a total rebuild. Not to say that you shouldn't go through it but it may have plenty of good miles left with the proper maintenance.
     
  13. heritic88
    Joined: Sep 7, 2008
    Posts: 116

    heritic88
    Member

    Yeah I'm hoping that's the case you never know


    If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer, and if then you don't succeed, get a beer.
     
  14. ZAPPER68
    Joined: Jun 13, 2010
    Posts: 206

    ZAPPER68
    Member
    from BC

    Another very good book is one entitled 'How to build Max Performance Chevy small blocks' by David Vizard under the 'Cartech' label. Vizard takes the simple approach at making horsepower on a budget if you so wish. Check it out....you won't be disappointed.
     
  15. deucemac
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 1,136

    deucemac
    Member

    No matter what way you, from mild to wild build, there are three things that must be adhered to. Leave out any one or cut corners on any one and you WILL be spending time and money over again.
    First. Always choose the highest quality parts for the build you choose.
    Second. Find the best machinist available. Even though he may be the best, always double check the work.
    Third. Make sure that you cleanly and carefully assemble the engine. Great engines have been destroyed by careless or rushed assembly.
    Do those things and you should enjoy years of dependable service from that engine. There is a special sense of accomplishment that you feel when the engine fires and runs well, I never tire of it. A lot of other guys know just what I mean.
     
  16. heritic88
    Joined: Sep 7, 2008
    Posts: 116

    heritic88
    Member

    Thanks I will check that one out


    If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer, and if then you don't succeed, get a beer.
     
  17. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 9,025

    jimmy six
    Member

    GM crate. Vinyl gloves, one weekend, should be having a beer by 3:00pm Sunday. Sell old engine. ;)
     
    oj likes this.
  18. heritic88
    Joined: Sep 7, 2008
    Posts: 116

    heritic88
    Member

    In a perfect world my friend in a perfect world.


    If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer, and if then you don't succeed, get a beer.
     
  19. heritic88
    Joined: Sep 7, 2008
    Posts: 116

    heritic88
    Member

    Definitely solid advice now I just need to find a good machinist that won't bend me over. I have absolutely no problem paying money for quality work, I just don't want to pay for shit work. I am hoping to get away with just doing the heads but I won't know until I know.


    If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer, and if then you don't succeed, get a beer.
     
  20. AV8 Dave
    Joined: Jan 3, 2003
    Posts: 680

    AV8 Dave
    Member

    My first was a 230 inline six out of a '64 Pontiac. Except for the siamese-port head, a great little engine. Forged crank with 7 main bearings. It went into a '54 Hudson Jet oval track racer. Got that little car around the oval just fine! Yup, read up on it as others have suggested and make sure you fully understand each step before you do it.
    And I will second all of "deucemac"'s tips plus watch the amount of gas you give it on the first fireup (something that I'm anal about on mine!). Don't want to wash the oil off those freshly bored and/or honed cylinder walls! Good luck! Regard, Dave.


    https://www.dropbox.com/s/etiqywtyvfmz85d/IMG_20161116_133149.jpg?dl=0e
     
  21. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 9,025

    jimmy six
    Member

    My suggestion was make you think about the expense of a rebuild. I assemble all my own engines and have aquired all the tools over 45 yrs. You are correct on a machinist but time is $$ and if you are only going to hone, re-ring, polish your crank with crocus cloth, clean your same piston, clean the ring grooves, use the same cam an lifters because the cam bearing are ok it's fairly low buck. Heads will need guide repair by what you are saying and a valve job for sure I'd guess in the $5-600 range plus gaskets. If any of the above work needs new like boring which means new pistons etc. it can easily lead to more than a GM crate. Their lowest hp one is right at 290 hp and can be bought for under $3K is guarrented and give you 100k miles..good luck.
     
  22. RodStRace
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 2,559

    RodStRace
    Member

    Sounds like this will be a mild freshen. Nothing wrong with that, and maybe you can get away with just a "valve job" and go. However, I'd suggest at least pulling the pan and front cover to inspect the crank bearings and timing chain. This will head off any surprises, allow for fresh gaskets and is more time than money.
    Make sure that all components are 'matched' for intended use. If the plan is to keep it a good cruiser with nice mid-range, decent economy and long life, stay away from high RPM, high horse parts. It's better to build torque for most street applications rather than build for max HP at some high RPM that you won't see on the street for more than a few seconds.
     
  23. heritic88
    Joined: Sep 7, 2008
    Posts: 116

    heritic88
    Member

    That is the way I am leaning it is really going to depend on how it looks when I pull it apart.


    If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer, and if then you don't succeed, get a beer.
     
  24. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 6,257

    oj
    Member

    I'm with JimmySix, I get those 290HP crate engine delivered to my door for $2050, a good triple two barrel intake & carb setup will cost about the same as the engine! They are bulletproof, have a nice little cam and you can drop them in with confidence, GM tests them before they leave. I have to deal with machinests and I'd as soon pay 2K to avoid having to listen to their bullshit, kinda makes the engine free.
     

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