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Technical Raising Coil Spring Front End

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by Spork!, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. Spork!
    Joined: May 5, 2010
    Posts: 195

    Spork!
    Member

    I'm building my 63.5 Galaxie and want to go with a Jr Stocker style but really like a gasser or maybe more correctly, a street freak style car.

    I'd like to go with a straight ax but not sure want the extra expense. I really like the way this Pontiac looks but I don't think it is really period correct (not that I am married to that).

    I also have a brand new rebuilt chassis built to stock (police package) specs so would hate to chop it up (can't post the photos for some reason) . The car is a roller so could use that frame as well.

    What is the best way to raise the coil spring front end a bit without screwing up the geometry?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Spork!
    Joined: May 5, 2010
    Posts: 195

    Spork!
    Member

    Like the way this Dodge sits.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. A set of heaver coil springs will raise the front,, a cheap alternative would be knuckle busters.

    Real popular back in the 60's.HRP

    [​IMG]
     
  4. 1971BB427
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 6,671

    1971BB427
    Member
    from Oregon

    Mark's Pontiac might not be "period correct", especially with it's twin turbo'd big block Poncho, but it's very cool! It's got a late 50's Chevy truck straight axle in it, a stubbed frame, and narrowed rear axle to fit the monster rubber out back. It's also running a trunk mounted radiator, and a tilt frontend! And it's got three pedals too!
    If you only want a modest lift, then heavier coils are the way I'd go, but it will stiffen things up a bit. Not fun getting them into the pockets and the A arms back in place too! But way cheaper than a straight axle!
     

  5. nickleone
    Joined: Jun 14, 2007
    Posts: 331

    nickleone
    Member

    Try these:
    Mr. Gasket/1 in. lift front rubber super coil spring spacer

    (0 reviews)
    <INPUT id=enlargedImage value=http://contentinfo.autozone.com/znetcs/product-info/en/US/mrg/1287/image/ type=hidden> [​IMG]


    <!-- Invodo video service response was null -->

    Part Number: 1287

    They fit on the top of the coil. In a past life I used them to raise the drivers side of vans that were converted for wheelchair drivers. They were originally used when dealers installed air conditioning in NEW cars. The spacer took care the extra weight of the AC and brought the car back to factory ride height.
    You will need to have an alignment done after install. You might find larger ones to give more lift. Don't use the knuclkebusters they can cause damage.

    Nick
     
  6. Nick is on the right track here. I have used these with good success in the past.
     
  7. Spork!
    Joined: May 5, 2010
    Posts: 195

    Spork!
    Member


    That car is very cool. Do you know how it rides and handles?
     
  8. Spork!
    Joined: May 5, 2010
    Posts: 195

    Spork!
    Member


    These look like the way to go. I've used similar spacers in Jeeps. Should keep stock ride with a little lift. Thanks.
     
  9. JackdaRabbit
    Joined: Jul 15, 2008
    Posts: 498

    JackdaRabbit
    Member
    from WNC

    I have used aluminum versions of those rubber spacers, too. They come in different thickness from Jegs, Summit, etc.
     
  10. lostone
    Joined: Oct 13, 2013
    Posts: 1,571

    lostone
    Member
    from kansas

    Yeah i have used the aluminum ones too. Now 1 thing to check is they will double in height when install atleast with the traditional lower arm/ spring design. So a 1/2 inch thick aluminum spacer will yeild 1 inch at the fenderwell of added height.
     
  11. 57Custom300
    Joined: Aug 21, 2009
    Posts: 1,353

    57Custom300
    Member
    from Arizona

    I recall putting one of those spacers on a new Mustang a young girl had just bought. Poor girl was in tears because the L front was noticeably lower. They didn't want to wait to have it fixed right so they had me put a shim in.
     
  12. 1971BB427
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 6,671

    1971BB427
    Member
    from Oregon

    It's still unfinished. Hasn't had it's first start up, or test run.
     
  13. 63comet
    Joined: Jan 31, 2006
    Posts: 508

    63comet
    Member

    Aren't there still companies out there making ball joint spacers? How much do they hurt steering?


    And I hate to bring such things up but there is a certain style of modern OT custom car that is often based on raised up classic '60s full sized cars. There are raised spindles available for a lot of old cars.
    I've pondered the idea of building a gasser styled street car using spindles acquired from one of the magazines with a young lady in the latest urban fashions showing off her well formed assets on the cover.
     
  14. 63comet
    Joined: Jan 31, 2006
    Posts: 508

    63comet
    Member

    I don't know if I installed them wrong or what but the only time I've used knuckle busters I had them fall out on me. That may have also been from me driving like an idiot enough to unload the suspension so often they lost their grip.
     
  15. fortynut
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,038

    fortynut
    Member

    We all know the old saying, that 'form follows function' has been thrown out with the bath water by those who want a 'look'. Here are a few suggestions for raising the front of your car without adding a dual leaf sprung straight axle. 1. Replace your front springs with longer ones, sourced from a heavier vehicle. (Good luck on squeezing them together to install --- springs are a bitch, anyway. 2. Add air shocks. Yeah. They were used to raise the rears of a lot of street machines and should work well, even if the front end is going to be stiff as a bridge-groom's dick (or, is it best man's?). 3. Bag the front end and air it up. 4. Stupid suggestion put small tires on the rear and big ones on the front, har har. 5. Add lowering blocks to the rear springs, for the speed boat look, not exactly what you asked for, but certainly raises the front in the air (some). Good Luck.
     
  16. I used the aluminum ones (home made..) on stock cars where weight jackers were banned. They worked pretty well.

    Keep in mind that the more you lift the front end, the camber gets real negative.

    Bob
     
  17. I used the aluminum ones (home made..) on stock cars where weight jackers were banned. They worked pretty well.

    Keep in mind that the more you lift the front end, the camber gets real negative.

    Bob
     
  18. 57Custom300
    Joined: Aug 21, 2009
    Posts: 1,353

    57Custom300
    Member
    from Arizona

    And I thought I was the only idiot that had 'em fall out.
     
  19. 1971BB427
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 6,671

    1971BB427
    Member
    from Oregon

    They don't always fall out. Sometimes they have clearance issues and the spring flexes enough to let the screw in spacers hit the spring pocket on a hard hit and knock them out. I lost a lot of them back in the 60's! ;)
     

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