Register now to get rid of these ads!

Quik Welding Question

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by gold5000000, Apr 13, 2009.

  1. hotrod-Linkin
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 3,382

    hotrod-Linkin
    Member

    you'll be lucky to even strike an arc with that thing.
     
  2. 39 All Ford
    Joined: Sep 15, 2008
    Posts: 1,531

    39 All Ford
    Member
    from Benton AR

    Am I getting this right?

    1. Flux core machine...

    2. Using solid wire... (without shielding gas)...

    While I really ain't much of a welder, I think it might be hard to get pretty welds this way, no matter the technique....
     
  3. budd
    Joined: Oct 31, 2006
    Posts: 3,478

    budd
    Member

    another good place to have a look at good welds is on heavy equipment, like backhoes, loaders, fork lifts, as for flux core wire along with a gas it is used where weld strength is critical, like high pressure pipe, what size wire are you useing, i would say no larger then .023, also try and plug your machine directly into an outlet, no extension cords. and not to much gas, just enough to keep from getting porosity.
     
  4. hotrod-Linkin
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 3,382

    hotrod-Linkin
    Member

    he said chicago welder. i have six of them in the shop that i bought for 10 bucks at an auction.they were all new and have never worked....
     
  5. Mad~Max
    Joined: Jun 4, 2008
    Posts: 277

    Mad~Max
    Member

    Not a good example here (could be used on truck frames), but I thought I would include it, as it is a common weld on buildings and bridges. You spend most of the day getting the edge beveled.

    The zig-zag is very popular on jig-welded auto frames. The bead looks really nice when your done, and people will always comment on how nice it looks (as opposed to stacked dimes torch look).

    Dennis Taylor did his Willy's frames this way, and speed is fast, you're done in a jiffy. You really need a 220 welder with adjustable voltage and wire speed. The min/max, or hot/cold is not going to be useful over the long run.
     
  6. Artwelder
    Joined: Jan 6, 2009
    Posts: 54

    Artwelder
    Member
    from OH

    Did they show the finished weld? A lot of times, you can't see any movement in the videos but they actually do move.

    I'll second that.

    And this.
     
  7. gold5000000
    Joined: Jan 1, 2009
    Posts: 243

    gold5000000
    Member

    I dont think it has any place to input the gas, at least none that i can find.
     
  8. gold5000000
    Joined: Jan 1, 2009
    Posts: 243

    gold5000000
    Member

  9. onlychevrolets
    Joined: Jan 23, 2006
    Posts: 2,307

    onlychevrolets
    Member

    I wouldn't buy it. It might do body work but thats all I'd try to weld.
     
  10. gold5000000
    Joined: Jan 1, 2009
    Posts: 243

    gold5000000
    Member

    no, i got it as a gift, and the only other welder i have is a big stick welder
     
  11. I'd join in with those suggesting taking a class at the local JC or wherever you can get a qualified instructor. One of the issues I see is that the MIG machines that seem affordable to a beginner are capable of putting down a cold lap that might look OK at first look but has no penetration. Knowing what to look for in the arc puddle is the key - and requires decent eyesight, clean lenses in your hood, clean material (get the mill scale off), and some knowledge of what you're looking for. And practice, practice, practice.
     
  12. Dan Timberlake
    Joined: Apr 28, 2010
    Posts: 1,331

    Dan Timberlake
    Member

    I think Jody over at WeldingTipsandtricks.com is quite competent, and knowledgeable.
    He MIGS with a variety of motions.
    Here's a start -
     
    keywestjack and clunker like this.
  13. oneratfink57
    Joined: Feb 12, 2006
    Posts: 728

    oneratfink57
    Member
    from Wisconsin

    Best advice given so far. Mig welding with any kind of whipping or zig zag etc is ill advised. It introduces discontinuities caused by variation of heat input and turbulence in the weld puddle. Those techniques are typically used to cover poor technique, settings, or joint preparation. That being said, most everything we are welding in relation to our hobby typically does not require complete joint penetration confirmed by X-ray or cross section and acid etch, but whatever.

    Morale of the story, when using proper weld settings and technique just push the puddle straight and true.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  14. oneratfink57
    Joined: Feb 12, 2006
    Posts: 728

    oneratfink57
    Member
    from Wisconsin

    And I just realized this thread is 8 years old... lol oh well!


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  15. keywestjack
    Joined: Jul 14, 2013
    Posts: 96

    keywestjack
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Pittsburgh

    I have learned a lot from Jody. His videos are instructive, and he is not consumed by his ego, rather helping out the welder (pro, diy, or anyone else that wants to learn).
     
  16. So does your rod size

    Sent from my MotoG3 using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  17. bobbyt239
    Joined: Mar 5, 2017
    Posts: 13

    bobbyt239

    I weld heavy equipment loader buckets and excavation buckets for a living. I will say this, welding is an art form and takes many of hours of learning before you even get pretty welds...uphill, downhill, overhead and flat horizontal. Much of the steel I weld is way over an inch thick and I never weave, zigzag or oscillate unless the metal is scaly or has any kind of contaminate. The little 110 welders can only do so much. Little stitch welds and spots are pretty much what they are intended for. Down hill welds are adequate as long as they have a slight crown or flat but never concave or cold rolled. FB_IMG_1488766210368.jpg FB_IMG_1488766219796.jpg FB_IMG_1488766230843.jpg
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.