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Question re: Pull Type Clutch Slave Cylinders

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Tdesoto276, Dec 21, 2006.

  1. Tdesoto276
    Joined: Mar 22, 2006
    Posts: 199

    Tdesoto276
    Member
    from Des Moines

    I am still in the planning stages of a hydraulic clutch system and I think I am going to have to go a Wilwood-style pull-type slave cylinder on the trans side of the clutch fork. Which direction is the slave cylinder mounted? Is the stationary rod mounted to the fork and the plunger mounted to the bracket or vice versa? It seems that if the stationary rod is fixed to the fork, I will need a flexible line from the master side to the slave. Any experience and pics appreciated.
     
  2. Vance
    Joined: Jan 3, 2005
    Posts: 2,135

    Vance
    Member
    from N/A

  3. jerry
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 3,473

    jerry
    Member

    I'm using a pull type slave cylinder on my truck. It's got the stationary end mounted to the stationary bracket on the crossmember. You can use either flex or hard line this way.


    jerry
     
  4. Rex Schimmer
    Joined: Nov 17, 2006
    Posts: 743

    Rex Schimmer
    Member
    from Fulton, CA

    This is a pic of the pull type slave cylinder that I adapted to the Ford T-5 tranny that I am puting in my roadster. The bellhousing is a Ford Zetec to T-5 that I got from Quad 4 in Denver. They suggested that I use the internal style of hydraulic slave and throw out bearing but I had all of the stuff from the Ford that the tranny came out of so I welded in a boss for the pivot bolt and then widowed the side of the bellhousing and the T-5 had a couple of nice tabs on it that allowed me to make a mount for the slave cylinder, and when I was done I had $65 in the pull type slave cylinder and a little fab time, not the $300 for the internal style. Anyone can buy parts and bolt them on, make them yourself, save money and have something no one else has.

    Rex
     

  5. Rex Schimmer
    Joined: Nov 17, 2006
    Posts: 743

    Rex Schimmer
    Member
    from Fulton, CA

    The picture didn't go thru, hope it does this time.

    Rex
     
  6. Rex Schimmer
    Joined: Nov 17, 2006
    Posts: 743

    Rex Schimmer
    Member
    from Fulton, CA

    One more time.
    Rex
     

    Attached Files:

  7. dontlifttoshift
    Joined: Sep 17, 2005
    Posts: 652

    dontlifttoshift
    Member

    I had a wilwood pull type on my truck. At first one end was on the clutch fork and the other (stationary end) on the crossmember. Problem was they unit kept unthreading itself and spilling its guts on the road. After three of those incidents (I'm real slow) I made a bracket that mounted the stationary end to the trans problem solved and trouble free after 20,000 hard miles since. You should some sort of flex line either way you mount it. Good luck.
     
  8. ROADRAT EDDIE
    Joined: Apr 17, 2005
    Posts: 1,349

    ROADRAT EDDIE
    Member
    from New york

    Don't use a Speedway one....Although i buy a lot of stuff from them, their pull type slave doesn't pull as far as a Wilwood....Found this out last winter on my last build when i couldn't get the car in gear....The Wilwood cured that
     
  9. Ricola
    Joined: Sep 8, 2007
    Posts: 100

    Ricola
    Member
    from MN

    Thanks for the info. I was wondering about the length of pull. Wilwood it is!
     
  10. McKool
    Joined: Dec 19, 2007
    Posts: 1

    McKool
    Member

    Best reason to use pull slave cylinder is if you mount the cylinder from the swivel rod end it keeps the thrust on the cylinder linear freeing the cylinder up to stroke correctly.
    The push type often induces some side thrust into the piston because of the ridgid and slightly misaligned mounting which kills the bore and adds friction that can make the pedal pressure required to release clutch heavier.

    What I don't like about the hydraulic throwout bearings is if they die on the road (mine did once)
    then you gotta pull the tranny on the side of the road to fix it.
    With the external slave carry a spare cylinder and a cresent wrench and you are good.
     
  11. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,199

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    Yea herd too many internal slave failures.
     
  12. I have been using McCloed hydraulic throw out bearing's in both my 390 fe cars. 1 toploader and a t5
    6 years now and never had a problem
    the cats ass
     
  13. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,199

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    Not what I was told by users
     

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