Register now to get rid of these ads!

Question on forming brake lines

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 41woodie, Jan 19, 2010.

  1. 41woodie
    Joined: Mar 3, 2004
    Posts: 1,095

    41woodie
    Member

    Two questions really, first does anyone know of something (rod, tubing) etc. that is fairly cheap that can be used to bend up patterns for brake lines. I'm really weird about neat tubing and I'm tired of ruining good ($$) brake tubing. It needs to be inexpensive, straight and will take and hold a bend.
    Second question is kind of silly but I'm curious why parts store straight brakelines have always had a long and short male end fitting. Why the two different length. I've never seen one that wasn't made like that so it must have some purpose other than making people wonder why.
     
  2. 383 240z
    Joined: Oct 28, 2007
    Posts: 429

    383 240z
    Member

    I've always used coat hangers or TIG rod for pattern material, as to the long and short male fittings, I think (and I'm prolly wrong) that it is to gain clearance at the wheel cylinders, I know it gets tight int there. Keith
     
  3. TagMan
    Joined: Dec 12, 2002
    Posts: 6,163

    TagMan
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yep, coat hangers or similar type wire.
     
  4. nofin
    Joined: Jan 7, 2010
    Posts: 321

    nofin
    Member
    from australia

    draw your curves on paper then bend the tube right over the drawing
     

  5. oldtin
    Joined: Dec 22, 2001
    Posts: 482

    oldtin
    Member

    I'm watching for the long vs short fitting answer....seems like I read it before, but damned if I can remember the answer.
     
  6. Paul
    Joined: Aug 29, 2002
    Posts: 15,460

    Paul
    Editor

    coat hangers work good,
    I also keep an assortment of scraps to bend to help find start points for bends,
    flares too
     
  7. R Pope
    Joined: Jan 23, 2006
    Posts: 3,309

    R Pope
    Member

    I always assumed the long fitting was for clearance at the wheel cylinders too, but don't know for sure.
     
  8. I grab the smallest copper tubing from the hardware store, like for refrigerator icemakers and use it over & over again to get some of the forms I want. Will take a bending and re-bending a few times and some of the hard bends I cut off and re-use by sticking in a piece of dowel in the inside then push together.

    Another hardware store trick for bigger tubing (like exhaust) is using PVC and couplings to mock up with. I don't glue them and I can pull apart and re-use as necessary.
     
  9. chevy3755
    Joined: Feb 6, 2006
    Posts: 1,044

    chevy3755
    Member

    i use welding rod.....
     
  10. I just put a parts store line on a wheel cylinder and the extra length wasn't really necessary there. It's handy sometimes when you're connecting two lines with a union, but that's all.
     
  11. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 6,262

    oj
    Member

    I use a 'rigid' brand tube bender so that the radii are fixed and it gives you different bend points. I stay away from parts store tubing, classic tube makes a good kit for you, 20 or 25' of high quality tube and a bag full of misc fittings. That way you run from termination point to termination point, no couplings. I don't make practice bends, you can bend tig wire like crazy but when you start working with the actual tube you'll find it is completely different than you thought even to the point where the bending direction gets important and you'll realize that practicing didn't prepare you.
     
  12. TagMan
    Joined: Dec 12, 2002
    Posts: 6,163

    TagMan
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I also save used long sections of brake lines I've removed from other jobs and cut / bend them as templates for making sure the ones I'm fabbing will work OK.
     
  13. I use coat hangers and scrap tubing - brake lines, fuel lines etc.... Those seem to work best....
     
  14. Drive Em
    Joined: Aug 25, 2006
    Posts: 1,748

    Drive Em
    Member

    Learn how to use the deductions(markings) that are on the bender, and there is no need for patterns. A pattern is only as good as how good you line up the tubing with the pattern. A tape measure and a working knowlege of the deductions on the bender are all you will need.
     
  15. Anybody know any links to a decent video showing the correct use of a brake line tubing bender ...where to align the marks..how to make an inside/outside corner...etc etc

    Drive em ...'splain "deduction marks"...

    Thanks
    Stan
     
  16. HOTTRODZZ
    Joined: Aug 21, 2006
    Posts: 335

    HOTTRODZZ
    Member

    .125 Dia aluminum rod - .090 mild steel works too.
     
  17. zman
    Joined: Apr 2, 2001
    Posts: 16,594

    zman
    Member
    from Garner, NC

    coat hangers over here...
     
  18. kmintexas
    Joined: Jan 16, 2010
    Posts: 11

    kmintexas
    Member
    from East Texas

    Call NAPA. See if they still carry steel tube, Copper flashed (won't rust). Buy a bulk roll of the tube. Take anything you van get your hands on that will bend to make a pattern and not straighten out or loose it's shape while your working with it. (3/32 steel brazing rod). Be sure to make all bends in brazing rod aprox the same bend your tubing bender will bend. Run a tape down the length of the pattern to get a general idea of the length of steel tube copper flashed you need to cut. Cut the tube 3/8" to 1/2" longer on both ends. (required length for double flare). Use a tubing straightener to straighten tube before bends are made. Now, bend your tubing to the pattern. Be sure and leave yourself enough length on the ends of the tube for the double flair tool. (about 2" to 3" of straight.) Once you have your tube bent and looking pretty good slip on the slip on your fittings. Long or short, doesn't matter as long as they thread in and seat out good. (I prefer short) Now, make your double flairs on both ends and you should be done.
     
  19. Here is a very good PDf on how to use a tubing bender. Be it swagelok's but it will translate to others well.
    I hope it helps
    <cite>www.swagelok.com/downloads/webcatalogs/EN/ms-13-43.pdf</cite>
     
  20. burnout2614
    Joined: Sep 21, 2009
    Posts: 612

    burnout2614
    Member

    All my coat hangers are plastic!.......wal-mart strikes again
     
  21. I use #9 wire, like what you thread thru the top of chain link fence, it's about the same diameter as the tubing.
     
  22. Any decent auto parts store will have 25' rolls of tubing and can sell you as many fittings as you need. There may also be places where a larger thread size fitting is required like where the line screws into some master cylinders and using brass adaptors looks mickey mouse to me. I bend & flare all my own lines and have no unions or adaptors anywhere. You can also buy the spiral wrap that goes over the lines in areas that need extra protection like the factory used on some cars. I get mine from the local Chevy dealer parts dept. but it's probably available from other sources. Never found the need to make practise bends but I've been doing it a long time.
     
  23. 41woodie
    Joined: Mar 3, 2004
    Posts: 1,095

    41woodie
    Member

    I use straight, coated NAPA tubing because I haven't been smart enough to figure out how to straighten tubing. Of course I can get it pretty straight but not STRAIGHT. Is there an inexpensive way to straighten tubing?
     
  24. 41woodie
    Joined: Mar 3, 2004
    Posts: 1,095

    41woodie
    Member

    Nother question, the Swagelock tools show that the smallest model takes 1/4" od tubing but 3/16" brake line is approximately .1750-65. Will the swagelock work properly on the smaller tubing?
     
  25. Rick 5150 69
    Joined: Sep 3, 2005
    Posts: 9

    Rick 5150 69
    Member
    from N Calif

  26. zman
    Joined: Apr 2, 2001
    Posts: 16,594

    zman
    Member
    from Garner, NC

  27. oj
    Joined: Jul 27, 2008
    Posts: 6,262

    oj
    Member


    I know what you mean. Classic tube sells a gizmo that straightens the tube out, like a double roller thing. I haven't used one.
    Here in the shop i use stainless tube that i get in 8' straight pieces and do it with -AN flare. I'm fussy too.
     
  28. If you are thinking about purchasing one, there are others that do just as good of a job alot alot less expensive. I saw one on fleabay for 97.00
    I was referring to the alignment marks and how to section of that document.
     
  29. wristpin
    Joined: Aug 31, 2009
    Posts: 48

    wristpin
    Member

    yesterday i went to napa for 3/16 brake line and they had this dark green , almost black brake tubing that they said will not kink or crimp when bending. a 4' stick was only $5.00. worked good .
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.