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Putting a Chrysler Industrial Hemi in a 52 Dodge truck

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by DanBabb, Mar 14, 2010.

  1. George
    Joined: Jan 1, 2005
    Posts: 7,335

    George
    Member

    You might add a spin on filter while running them. Have a filter on the mount while mocking it up.
     
  2. leadhead51
    Joined: Mar 25, 2011
    Posts: 132

    leadhead51
    Member
    from ontario

    can't wait for the tire frying video!
     
  3. I thought the transmission had a filter inside the pan. Didn't think I'd need another filter for it. Is this optional or one of those "you really should do it" things?

    I don't expect this to be a high mileage use truck...and didn't account for this when ordering the fittings for the lines.
     
  4. 73RR
    Joined: Jan 29, 2007
    Posts: 6,467

    73RR
    Member

    Dan, the extra filter is one of those 'nice-to-have' items. Obviously, a spin-on is easier to change, and the additional fluid capacity is never a bad thing. There are plenty of filter/mount options if you decide to include one.

    .
     
  5. George
    Joined: Jan 1, 2005
    Posts: 7,335

    George
    Member

    The "filter" inside is usually described as a screen, plus it's another fluid cooling opportunity.
     
  6. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 3,124

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

  7. Thanks to some welding help from Rockable, I got the rear axle swapped in this weekend. The axle is out of a 96 Cherokee with 3.55 gears. I wound up getting all new brakes & running new lines.

    [​IMG]

    Going to finish up the brake lines (today hopefully). I'm only a couple parts purchases away from being on the road. Need to get a transmission yoke so I can measure and modify the stock driveshaft. Then I need to get new lights.

    Other than that, all that's left is to get the engine tuned better, get the front sheet metal reinstalled and bleed the brakes.
     
    Sparky52Dodge likes this.
  8. Rusty46
    Joined: Jun 30, 2011
    Posts: 45

    Rusty46
    Member

    Do you remember what you did to get by with starter/steering box issue? I am facing the same headache in '41 Dodge with an LA small block right now...

    Dan...

    This is a cool build. I really enjoyed it!
     
    Sparky52Dodge likes this.
  9. farmer12
    Joined: Aug 28, 2006
    Posts: 7,717

    farmer12
    Member

    Great work Dan, go man go!
     
  10. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 3,124

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Did the pinion angle check out ok, Dan?
     
  11. Thanks Farmer.

    Rusty....I used a Chevy TH350 transmission and ordered the adapter plate with the starter on the passenger side.

    With the mopar automatic transmission options, putting the starter on the passenger side wasn't an option. I think you could also use a T5, but I wanted an automatic.

    The exhaust routing is going to be a bit goofy because of the steering box and the fuel tank being on the driver side, but I have room on the passenger side for that too.


    Rock...the angles are almost perfect. Taking all the time to measure worked out (for once).
     
  12. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 3,124

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Measure twice (at least) and cut (or weld) once. :)
     
  13. I hate working on the brakes.

    Got everything connected and trying to get the system bled. One of my flares is leaking...no matter how hard it's cranked down, it squirts.

    So back to the auto parts store to borrow their flaring tool and pull off at least one of the lines.

    Feel like the finish line is in sight, but every once in a while, it gets a little further away.
     
  14. Chin up Dan, Your probably out crusin' already!
     
  15. No such luck...Been working on it on & off for the day and a couple spots are still leaking badly and I can't get them to stop.

    If throwing a temper tantrum would help, I'd be lying on the floor screaming like a 2 year old. This sucks!
     
  16. Been working all week and still dealing with leaks.

    I'm going to have to take out a few lines (and some other parts to get to one of them ) so I can start over with those lines.

    Probably going to get them out and measure them...then get some preflared lines as close to the right length as possible so I don't have to flare them on my own (since I obviously suck at that).

    I also wound up breaking one of the speed bleeder screws right in the drum cylinder. Because it's a speed bleeder, it's not leaking, but I'm going to have to pull the drum apart so I can take out the cylinder and replace it with a new one because I probably can't get it out easily (and it was a brand new part to begin with).

    I did spend a little time with a vacuum gauge last night to try to fine tune the timing. Messed around the the dizzy to try to get the peak vacuum reading. Got a nice steady reading at 16" so I locked the dizzy there for now. It stumbles a bit at 4000 rpms, but that could be a fuel issue...I haven't messed around with the carb settings at all (probably going to bring the truck to someone for that fine tuning when it's on the road).
     
  17. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 3,124

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Come by this weekend and I'll loan you a good flaring tool and teach you how to do it. It's not that hard but if you don't have a good tool, you cannot make a good flare.
     
  18. I just got a new brake line switch fitting in the mail - jegs replaced the one they sent me that looked a bit mucked up on the inside. I think that's my last remaining leak...we'll see.

    If this truck still has leaking brake lines by this weekend, I might just douse it is gas and set it ablaze.
     
  19. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 3,124

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Don't do that! It's time to walk away when you get that frustrated. It'll still be there when you get back and the problem won't seem nearly as big. :)
     
  20. russd
    Joined: Nov 17, 2007
    Posts: 113

    russd
    Member

    great project and even better for me as i will be following suit over the next few years! good job motor sounds great to.
     
  21. 73RR
    Joined: Jan 29, 2007
    Posts: 6,467

    73RR
    Member


    Hey Dan, its just a pile of scrap metal hand formed into a particular shape...not some evil demon testing your will...:p
    Somedays we all need to take a break.

    Keep us posted

    Gary
     
  22. I'm starting to doubt that statement.

    On Sunday, I decided to take a break and took my 68 Camaro out for a spin. Stopped at the self service car wash to clean it off and vacuum the interior. Noticed that my passenger side carpet was soaked (really wet) with oil. Must be the oil pressure gauge line leaking (even though the gauge works and shows pressure, it must be a slow leak). So I cleaned it up, but now I have to take the center console apart and get a new oil line.

    Now I have two classics I can't drive.

    The cars might not be possessed...maybe it's just me.

    Going to get back to work on the truck tonight and will try to stay positive.


    Thanks for the words of encouragement. You guys rock.
     
  23. I think i got the leaks sealed up and have been bleeding fluid, but the pedal just isnt feeling any firmer. I really dont notice a difference in firmness whether I have a bleeder opened or shut. I can push it all the way to the floor with no resistance.

    When they are closed and i put pressure, i don't see puddles or even decent sized drips.

    Any tips on what to check?

    Brake pedal setup looks like this

    [​IMG]
     
  24. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 3,124

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Did you bench bleed the master cylinder, Dan? If not, that's step one.
     
  25. Took out the MC on Sunday and bench bled it...there was a ton of air trapped in there. Got it reinstalled and went through the brake line bleeding process again.

    Still have a soft pedal. Found 3 little leaks. Seems like a never ending process. If I could drive the truck, I'd bring it to the mechanic and let him put it up on a lift and fix the leaks....this shit's getting old!
     
  26. 73RR
    Joined: Jan 29, 2007
    Posts: 6,467

    73RR
    Member

    Small leaks do not equate to a soft pedal. If the pedal is soft/mushy then there is still air trapped somewhere. Brake fluid (like most any fluid) does not compress; air compresses.

    ...I sure wish you'd get this resolved and get that truck on the road, I have a need to hear about that first ride with the hammer down...:D

    .
     
  27. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 3,124

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Damn, Dan. Come see me this weekend and I'll explain to you how to bleed the brakes and fix the leaks.
     
  28. moparmonkey
    Joined: Aug 14, 2009
    Posts: 565

    moparmonkey
    Member
    from NorCal

    Sounds like there's probably still air trapped in the system. Depending on how you mounted the calipers in the front (disk conversion right?), they can sometimes trap air in the calipers too. But here's another possibility-

    What is the size of the bore on the new master cylinder?

    When you start mixing and matching parts, sometimes things don't work out. If the bore on the master cylinder is too small, it won't move enough fluid, and you won't get a firm pedal without pumping.

    I recently had this exact experience when I went to a 2 chamber master cylinder on my g/f's '55 Coronet, the first one I tried was slightly smaller in bore size than the original (1 1/32" vs. 1 1/8"), and even after bleeding all the air the pedal was soft all the way to the floor. I found a 2 chamber m/c with an 1 1/8" bore, problem solved. 3/32's of an inch on the bore was all it took...

    The other thing you might want to check is that the master cylinder was intended for a disk/drum set up. If its a disk/disk master cylinder, it won't have the residual valve the drums need in the rear to hold the shoes out, and it will take a lot of extra pedal travel to overcome the lack of the residual valve.
     
  29. I believe I have parts that should all work together.

    The MC is a GM part and is for a disc/drum setup. Front calipers are GM and the rear drums are Jeep.

    I have a 10# valve on the rear line and 2# valves on the front lines. I've read that with a low mounted master, you need to run those valves to prevent fluid from running back to the master.

    I ran 3/16 lines everywhere (except for the rubber lines that connect to the front discs and the rear axle).

    I have the bleeders on the front pointed straight up, so I do have those on the correct side ( I made that mistake years ago on another project).

    I'm not 100% sure that I have the rear drum pads adjusted right where they need to be...but they should be close enough for me to get a solid pedal.

    I also checked last night and the pedal seems like it comes all the way out, so there's enough slack for the MC to fully release.

    I did get a lot of air out of the system last night and the pedal felts a little better....but I can push it all the way to the floor with just one hand. I'm using speed bleeders, so I don't think I'm pulling air back in when I release the pedal either.

    This is frustrating because of all the back & forth because I'm doing it alone and it seems like a never ending process.
     
  30. You really need a helper to pump the brakes while you open the bleeders... Even with speed bleeders.
    Adjust the rear brakes up until they lock, then back them off just until the wheel turns free. Make sure the emergency brake linkage is slack.
     

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