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Features Pushing Limits

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by J.Ukrop, Jun 21, 2019.

  1. J.Ukrop
    Joined: Nov 10, 2008
    Posts: 1,007

    J.Ukrop
    SUPER MODERATOR
    Staff Member

    J.Ukrop submitted a new blog post:

    Pushing Limits

    [​IMG]

    Continue reading the Original Blog Post
     
  2. It's a pretty cool looking car with a lot of style but, from the side view there is a obvious hiccup with the suspension location for the rear independent, the protrusion in front of the rear wheel just blurs the smooth lines.

    Other than that it is a beautiful car. HRP
     
  3. sololobo
    Joined: Aug 23, 2006
    Posts: 7,882

    sololobo
    Member

    why would there be pipes going off the headers under the car for mufflers? Awesome hot rod, not being critical, just curious
     
  4. Rolleiflex
    Joined: Oct 25, 2007
    Posts: 876

    Rolleiflex
    Member

    @sololobo take a look at the picture where they're polishing it. The end of the pipe looks really clean. I'm betting there's some sort of block off that diverts the exhaust down. I'm thinking the tips are purely aesthetic.

    I'd lose the bobbed fenders, but other than that I like it.
     
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  5. Here's one of my father's pics of Tony Martinez' Hiboy at ANDY'S PICNIC in July of 1969:

    Andy's 3rd Annual Picnic - July '69 -  Kodachrome 16.jpg
    Tony Martinez' dark blue '29 Roadster on Deuce rails ... featured Corvette IRS and rat motor

    ... from atop the hill, dad caught three rodders contemplating the 331ci HEMI in our Deuce Coupe:

    Andy's 3rd Annual Picnic - July '69 -  Kodachrome 10.jpg
    "A Rose Between Two Thorns"
    :rolleyes: :D
    The "HEMI32" Coupe flanked by two Chevy-powered Roadsters:
    Dino @fremont32 Ramacciotti's '32 with a 327ci SBC (R) and the Martinez' '29 with a BBC (L)

    ... and 40 years later, I shot a pic of the car at the Goodguy's West Coast Nationals in August of 2009:

    Tony Martinez' Roadster @ GGs WCN '09.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2019
  6. Andy @AndySS Southard Jr. put Tony's Roadster on the cover of his "HOT RODs & CUSTOMs of the 1960s" book:

    Hot Rods & Customs of the 1960s.jpg
     
  7. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 42,707

    squirrel
    Member

    It looks so much meaner with the rear fenders on....and the bias ply tires
     
  8. Rolleiflex
    Joined: Oct 25, 2007
    Posts: 876

    Rolleiflex
    Member

    ↑ Ha, ha I agree and I'm now rethinking what I said about them.
    The top on it with the fenders makes it downright sinister.
     
    cactus1 likes this.
  9. Andy @AndySS Southard Jr. put Tony's Roadster on the cover of his "Street Roadster of the Year " article in the July 1969 issue of HOT ROD Magazine:

    HRM - July 1969 - page 98.jpg
    HRM - July 1969 - page 99.jpg
     
  10. Some pics of Tony's Roadster at the 1969 GNRS (aka the Oakland Roadster Show):

    Tony Martinez Hiboy at '69 GNRS (James Handy).jpg
    image by James Handy

    Tony Martinez Hiboy at '69 GNRS (1).jpg
    Tony Martinez Hiboy at '69 GNRS (2).jpg
    Tony Martinez Hiboy at '69 GNRS (3).jpg
    photographer unknown
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2019
  11. Tim
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 9,541

    Tim
    Member
    from Raytown Mo

    I’d say it’s extremely traditional.

    I think the word traditional seems to get attached to whatever era, period, is currently in vogue.

    Right now there’s a lot of 40’s style hot rodding going on. Is this car period correct to the 40’s? Fuck no.

    Is it period correct to the cut off to this website? That’s the line it’s walking, but really only by a year or so with the big block and the Vette rear.

    I think the year cut off of the HAMB has just as much to do with the style as the year of the car.

    Anyhow. It’s pretty fucking cool, thanks for sharing it
     
    alanp561 and Automotive Stud like this.
  12. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 17,214

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California

    the car is timeless, it will always look good and never be like the shitstains we had in the 90's.
     
    Hotdoggin DaddyO and cactus1 like this.
  13. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 25,008

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    State of the art mid 60's hot rod that had evolved over a few years as most hot rods did then.
    Those photos from the July 69 hot rod look real familiar as I studied those for more than a little bit just before I got out of the army and still have that issue somewhere in the stack.
    Plug inside the end of the pipe because you didn't drive on the streets with open headers then. That's a poser thing that came much later or started as a pro fairgrounds poser thing and expanded into the common use it has now.
     
  14. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 42,707

    squirrel
    Member

    The Vette parts were around in 65, but they were a very small part of the hot rodding scene at the time. That stuff was expensive back then, too!
     
    49ratfink likes this.
  15. belair
    Joined: Jul 10, 2006
    Posts: 7,990

    belair
    Member

    Are those 49/50 Ford tail lights? I like them. Nice change from the 48 chevy, 39 ford, or 50 Pontiac. Neat car, cutting edge once upon a time. The front tires are too wide, but styles do change.
     
  16. wicarnut
    Joined: Oct 29, 2009
    Posts: 2,996

    wicarnut
    Member

    Very Kool Ride !
     
  17. Tim
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 9,541

    Tim
    Member
    from Raytown Mo

    At least they are all same year vette parts so in theory you could get a wrecked vette and party on. Compared to some of these 40’s styled hot rods that have every super rare dodad known to man on it. You would have legitimately had a fuck load of cash in that era to seek out and use all that on the same car.

    So you could argue that having a vette parts car is more period correct - feasibly actually happened- than the old style builds with rare parts.

    And yeah I think I like it with the fenders and no hood better. Great photos everybody!
     
    Crazy Steve and kidcampbell71 like this.
  18. That profile shot is perfection.
     
  19. Another pic from page 14 of the November 1969 issue of ROD & Custom:

    ROD&Custom - Nov '69 - pg14 crop.jpg
    image by Andy @AndySS Southard Jr.

    ROD&Custom - Nov '69 - pg12.jpg ROD&Custom - Nov '69 - pg13.jpg ROD&Custom - Nov '69 - pg14.jpg ROD&Custom - Nov '69 - pg15.jpg
    entire article - click thumbnail to enlarge
     
    kidcampbell71 likes this.
  20. JRussell
    Joined: Nov 21, 2003
    Posts: 490

    JRussell
    Member

    Tony’s car is bad ass !! 100%


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
    kidcampbell71 likes this.
  21. Bandit Billy
    Joined: Sep 16, 2014
    Posts: 5,129

    Bandit Billy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I love the good years! That blue stripe and lettering has always been one of my favorites. I'd have left them on in a heart beat. I also noticed the corvette shifter on the floor. Traditional in my book!
     
  22. primed34
    Joined: Feb 3, 2007
    Posts: 904

    primed34
    Member

    I've always liked that car. I like it better with the bobbed rear fenders.
     
    kidcampbell71 likes this.
  23. verde742
    Joined: Aug 11, 2010
    Posts: 4,957

    verde742
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Is that rack and pinion steering "hooked" to the frame?


    Give THAT some thought for a while......
     
  24. hotrodmano
    Joined: May 3, 2011
    Posts: 309

    hotrodmano
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Norway

    I guess it depends on where one draws the line of what a "traditional hot rod " are?
    You can alway say that for instance Tom McMullens 32 Roadster is traditional in the sence that it has been around along time and have traditions in the hot rod enviroment. So...both this car and McMullens might be considered "historical hot rods" but "traditional??" Nope. Not in my eyes...and mind. A traditional hot rod is buildt close to the 30s,40s and early 50s style with parts, replicas or originals, from that era. I mean. You have to draw the line somewhere. Whats next? Red 1980s street rods by Boyd becomes traditional hot rods??:p
    Just my opinion and who cares about what I think? :D
    But.......in the end its just words. :cool:
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2019
  25. 08racer
    Joined: Jun 13, 2005
    Posts: 786

    08racer
    Member
    from Gilbert AZ

    One of my favorite roadsters! Happy to see it getting some love on here.
     
  26. Richard Bartrop
    Joined: Jun 1, 2014
    Posts: 3

    Richard Bartrop

    Maybe we need a new term for cars that maybe fall outside the usual traditional hot rod time from, or don't tick of all the traditional hot rod boxes, but are still worth considering. Maybe take a page from art history, and call it...post traditional?
     
  27. I'm curious about what 'limit' is being pushed here...

    The HAMB since I've been here has had more than a bit of a split personality. The '65 cut-off has always struck me as somewhat arbitrary, at least when it comes to Hot Rods. I get it on the customs/Detroit iron side; 'traditional' customs were all but dead by then (Ford's Custom Caravan was gone, and even GM and Mopar cut way back on display of 'concept cars') and Detroit was in full muscle-car fever mode until the party ended in '72 with the arrival of nation-wide smog/safety laws. But on the Hot Rod side, not that much changed...

    Now the hard-core traditionalists would have you believe that any 'trad' car has to be built with only period parts and in slavish imitation of what came 'commonly' before. Ignoring the fact that imagination and innovation has always been a driving force in the hobby. There's been more than a few bizarre threads on here where period-built cars were declared as 'non-traditional' by some because they didn't look like every other car. Muddying the waters further, the somewhat uneasy acceptance of more modern parts and building methods (OD trans, TIG, air bags to name just a few) has diluted the traditionalist position.

    Which brings us to the feature car. Built in the pre-billet/catalog parts era, this car was built the old-fashioned way. It's pretty obvious he got access to a totaled 'Vette, donating 'upgrade' parts just like the 'old days'. Being almost entirely home-built is another very traditional mark; anybody who can single-handedly build a car to this level deserves admiration and respect. Other than the then-popular wheels/tires, the build style is entirely traditional; change those and this wouldn't raise any eyebrows pulling into a show. He nailed that timeless look and IMO is a better representation of a Hot Rod than some of the recent 'traditional' AMBR winners.
     
    AmishMike likes this.

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