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Technical Parkerizing Bolts and Small Brackets?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by lake_harley, Mar 28, 2021.

  1. lake_harley
    Joined: Jun 4, 2017
    Posts: 1,410

    lake_harley
    Member

    In a thread I read recently, someone mentioned Parkerizing some parts. I did a bit of searching on the web and it doesn't seem like a terribly involved or expensive process. I found some discussion here on the HAMB, but there were (as usual) conflicting opinions that didn't really answer the questions I have. What I wonder is this:

    Would Parkerizing bolts have a negative effect on bolt strength or affect torqueing?

    Is Parkerizing a durable coating, or would parts start corroding or rusting in typical conditions on a hot rod? I'm not talking about extreme conditions of road salt, etc. on a regular daily driver.

    In what I read there is a basic zinc phosphating which is a light grey finish (?), and then a couple other versions, one with manganese in particular, that gives a darker color. Do parts have to be treated with the zinc process first and then the darker versions are done as a second stage, or can you just go directly to the charcoal colored darker process in one step?

    I'd be interested to do bolts and small brackets if it held up well. I've never been able to tighten a bolt, nut or screw without chipping the paint if I have only rattle-canned them. I guess glass-beading bolts and brackets would be an acceptable cleaning method prior to Parkerizing?

    Thanks, in advance for input from those of you who have experience with Parkerizing.

    Lynn
     
    lothiandon1940 likes this.
  2. Pete1
    Joined: Aug 23, 2004
    Posts: 1,969

    Pete1
    Member
    from Wa.

     
  3. Jmountainjr
    Joined: Dec 29, 2006
    Posts: 1,354

    Jmountainjr
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Parkerizing is a durable finish, but a hot dip process. For small bolts and brackets at home cold dip black oxide gives a good result with significantly less equipment.
     
    lothiandon1940 likes this.
  4. ffr1222k
    Joined: Nov 5, 2009
    Posts: 1,168

    ffr1222k
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    In 1971 my M16 was parkerized. It held up vey well.
     

  5. Pete1
    Joined: Aug 23, 2004
    Posts: 1,969

    Pete1
    Member
    from Wa.


    M16 = spray and pray.....LOL
     
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  6. Wrench97
    Joined: Jan 29, 2020
    Posts: 413

    Wrench97

    Is the used water a hazardous waste?
    What is the cost of disposing of the used Parkerizing liquid ?
     
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  7. Tman
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 34,037

    Tman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    really?
     
    Bandit Billy and '40ford like this.
  8. Yes the left over stuff will be hazardous and should be disposed of correctly.

    home brew recipes are all over the net .

    as is the MSDS sheet listing what’s in it and how handle and dispose of it.

    seems ventilation is key to not get sick or dying !

    looks like a great product to protect certain metal parts etc.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2021
    lothiandon1940 and Stogy like this.
  9. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
    Posts: 19,477

    Stogy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Chemicals are no joke in the environment so that is an absolutely valid question...Yeah this stuff sounds like Alodine.

    I worked at a 113 Acre Wartime Aircraft Facility that did just pour chemicals everywhere over the years...stored spent pcb's tested munitions and who knows what...that was closed in 2005...they are still dealing with remediation of contamination. There are holes and vents littering the property...we are what we eat and drink...what's in your well and tap water...I store my spent oils, and all other spent chemicals on a shelf and again take it to the Municipal Centers that deal with it...Its actually usually a free service...It protects our environment...

    Gasoline, Antifreeze, Paints, Oils, etc. etc I just pour it in a container (maybe the original as it is an identifier) that it won't melt perhaps a juice bottle and write what it is on the outside...

    It truly is worth it and if it isn't and your kids have children with eyes missing or brain deficiencies or cancers look at yourself in the mirror...and think about it...

    We're actually paying for it now with our own being...Thanks to those who understand that we can do better...;)
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2021
  10. kabinenroller
    Joined: Jan 26, 2012
    Posts: 643

    kabinenroller
    Member

    I had mentioned on the other thread that I Parkerized the hardware on the restorations I have done on vintage Messerschmitt microcars. I was made aware of this process by talking to “Racer X”, he used this process when he was restoring vintage motorcycles.
    I purchase the chemicals from Palmetto Ent. https://www.palmettoenterprisesparkerizing.com/
    I media blast all the parts then use a small hot plate and a stainless steel pan to heat the chemical to the recommended temp. After the parts are in the chemical and turn a dark charcoal color I then soak the parts in used drain oil before letting the parts drain on newspaper. After a quick wipe with paper towel the parts are ready to install. As for durability, I use my parts on vehicles that never see inclement weather so I cannot comment on how durable the finish is. The finish is exactly what I was looking for to duplicate what the factory used when the cars were manufactured.
     
  11. Grease348
    Joined: Nov 25, 2020
    Posts: 24

    Grease348

    I recently received a cold blackening kit from EPI. I haven’t got my parts cleaned up yet to use it. I learned about it on Utube. Hagarty was demonstrating it on model a connecting rods. I believe the entry level kit was 47.00.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    Stogy likes this.
  12. Pete1
    Joined: Aug 23, 2004
    Posts: 1,969

    Pete1
    Member
    from Wa.

    No, the water is not hazardous any more than used water from a dishwasher. Remember, it is HOT. It evaporates. You just keep adding to it.
    I have never dumped my acid tank. I just keep replenishing it. If you have to dump it, it can be handled like used motor oil.
     
  13. lake_harley
    Joined: Jun 4, 2017
    Posts: 1,410

    lake_harley
    Member

    Pete1.... Thanks for the detailed and helpful information! Sounds like I need to do some more studying of the process to see if I could put a Parkerizing system into operation.

    For the stainless steel chemical tank could a large stainless steel stock pot be used? I have no idea of what alloy stainless they might be made of. Is the alloy of stainless critical, ie; 304, 316....? I could TIG a stainless tank together from leftover 16 Ga. drops I have, maybe 12" X 12" X 8" in size, but I was wondering if a stainless pot from a resale shop would be a simple possibility?

    I might expect something better than regular tap water would be good to use for the pre and post treatment. We have a reverse osmosis drinking water system so that part would be simple. It's very low in total dissolved solids....not distilled quality but really close.

    I'm not a fan of chrome and polishing things but Parkerizing sounds upscale compared to satin black rattle can painted bolts and parts.

    Thanks for all the posts.

    Lynn
     
  14. mkubacak
    Joined: Jun 20, 2005
    Posts: 188

    mkubacak
    Member

    Pictures please?
     
  15. Pete1
    Joined: Aug 23, 2004
    Posts: 1,969

    Pete1
    Member
    from Wa.

     
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  16. Pete1
    Joined: Aug 23, 2004
    Posts: 1,969

    Pete1
    Member
    from Wa.

    It is not a very good pic but all I have. Front shocks.png
     
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  17. Torana68
    Joined: Jan 28, 2008
    Posts: 1,252

    Torana68
    Member
    from Australia

    I take all my stuff into the local plater to be either silver zinc or passivated gold zinc. Doesn't cost a lot and protects bolts I need to save. think Ford script or other specially marked that cant be bought. Otherwise I go buy new.
     
  18. 31 Coupe
    Joined: Feb 25, 2008
    Posts: 254

    31 Coupe
    Member

    Just be careful of Hydrogen Embrittlement when electroplating HT bolts etc.
    Black Oxide coating/dip processes don't usually suffer from HE.
     
  19. Beanscoot
    Joined: May 14, 2008
    Posts: 1,978

    Beanscoot
    Member

    I had a friend who worked at a plating facility that Parkerized gun (as opposed to small arms) parts for the Navy. He said the Parkerizing itself didn't protect the metal, its function was to hold oil which did provide some protection.
     
    Tman likes this.
  20. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 16,840

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I have bolts and small brackets white zinc plated at a local facility. Turns out looking just like the silver hardware store bolts you can buy. It costs me about $100 for anything I can fit into a five gallon bucket. The corrosion protection is the same as a hardware store bolt. I just sandblast the parts in my cabinet and stick them in the bucket.
     
  21. i have done alot of this for my antique harleys. most of their bolts and brackets were finished this way. the amount of iron in the part will determine how dark it turns. i prefer to use the dirtiest diesel oil for best results. the parts are first sand blasted clean. i heat the solution in a metal pan on the stove. a hot plate works to. drop the parts in the solution. when the parts stop fizzing i give them a few more minutes. they should have turned black. i use hot dog tonges to pick up the hot parts. i drop the into the container of oil. they sit in there until im done doing all the parts. i ussually let them sit in there for 15 minutes. i then take them out and place them on towels. dont wipe them off. let them sit over night. the hot bolts absorb the oil. now wipe them off and install. the parts will eventually start to rust. a few swipes with a brass brush will remove it. then wipe the part with oil to return the part to a fresh finish. this can be done several times before they need to be redone. the solution once it cools off can be returned to the container for future use.
     
    A Boner likes this.
  22. lcfman
    Joined: Sep 1, 2009
    Posts: 276

    lcfman
    Member
    from tn

    I bought a zinc dichromate plating kit from Eastwood a few years ago (15 yrs) I used on my 59 Impala .It worked pretty good. Just recently I made a trunk latch for my 32 Ford out of steel and broke out the old plating kit and plated the latch. It worked good but took a longer on the solution. I think it might be a good chose for you. Its for smaller parts and bolts.
     

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