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Customs Paint or undercoat on bottom of floors

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 4EyedTurd, May 11, 2019.

  1. distributorguy
    Joined: Feb 15, 2013
    Posts: 28

    distributorguy
    Member
    from MN

    My one experience with Raptor was bad. It peeled off. You need 4x as much as they recommend to get a good build so it won't peel or flake. For that price get it professionally applied with a warranty. Even then, I'd only apply it over a good sealer like DP epoxy or paint, so the first step is to paint, even if you roll on some Rustoleum.
     
  2. okiedokie
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 3,485

    okiedokie
    Member
    from Ok

    The underside of my 40 coupe body was painted along with top. After spraying the inside with Lizard Skin I decided to spray the underside also. I was told by many that it was not the thing to do but now after 10 years and 30,000 miles it looks as good as it did then. I have never tested it for burning but I do have a piece of metal coated with it and will test it.
     
  3. okiedokie
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 3,485

    okiedokie
    Member
    from Ok

    I tested the Lizard Skin on a piece of floor that I cut out of the trunk of my 40. It has LS on both sides. Holding a butane torch to one side and no fire occured. I also put a drop of water on one side and held the flame under the other side and it had no effect on the water after holding the flame there for a couple of minutes.
     
    Blues4U likes this.
  4. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 3,572

    indyjps
    Member

    Check out gravitex by UPOL or raptor by UPOL. Gravitex is Raptor bedliner with less texture, meant for rocker panels, designed to be topcoated with paint. Tcpglobal and others carry UPOL.

    I taped off and used gravitex on most area of the floor but left brackets and subframe uncoated, then shot the entire bottom with urethane. Everything was blasted and primed first.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  5. Blues4U
    Joined: Oct 1, 2015
    Posts: 3,435

    Blues4U
    Member
    from So Cal

    Yeah, I had to question this as well. Lizard Skin is basically latex paint with micro ceramic balls dispersed throughout it, nothing really flammable.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  6. porknbeaner
    Joined: Sep 12, 2003
    Posts: 40,954

    porknbeaner
    Member

    WE used to scrape the under coating off of our cars when we had cars that were undercoated. Unless it is applied perfectly it will trap water even in a state with no salt water trapped can cause a serious rust problem. Well that and its heavy. LOL
     
    town sedan likes this.
  7. Tri-Power
    Joined: Jun 23, 2008
    Posts: 147

    Tri-Power
    Member
    from Memphis

    Blues4U is correct. I used a micro balloon additive for latex paint and did the underside and inside of my truck and it works great. Very cool inside and quiet too. No other sound deadening. The additive cost about $50, then add it to a gallon of latex house paint and you're good to go.[​IMG]
     
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  8. Tri-Power
    Joined: Jun 23, 2008
    Posts: 147

    Tri-Power
    Member
    from Memphis

    Oh heck, I just found it on amazon for less than half of what I paid 15 years ago!!!
     
  9. Pats55
    Joined: Apr 29, 2013
    Posts: 160

    Pats55
    Member
    from NJ

    I cried myself to sleep last night. This Is how I did the bottom of my last car.Of course I used my coatings. This is one of the most powerful systems to combat rust and corrosion.
    Although tightening environmental regulations have fueled advancements in coal-fired generating technologies and emissions control equipment, belt conveyor systems used to move the fossil fuel from bunker to burner operate basically the same today as they have for decades. Keeping these systems running at optimum safety and efficiency requires regular monitoring of idlers, bearings, drives, pulleys and belting that operate over long periods of time in a dusty, constantly vibrating environment under a wide range of temperatures.

    [​IMG]Manual inspections, sometimes described as "walking the belts," are one way to identify potential problems that can reduce conveyor performance, or even cause a system breakdown. Conditions such as overheated components, overloading, belt slippage, loss of synchronization between conveyors and sharp pieces of tramp iron or other material wedged into the conveyor can damage a belt. The accumulation of coal dust on and under conveyor equipment is another concern for power plant personnel given its risk of ignition, especially where Powder River Basin (PRB) coal is burned. From 1984 to 2004, 23 coal dust explosions at U.S. power plants killed 16 and injured 95 people, according to industry statistics.

    Coal combustion results in the release of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NO2), mercury (Hg) and particulate matter (PM) that contribute to the corrosion of metal surfaces and conveyor components. "Due to the high sulfur content in coal dust, when it mixes with moisture and high humidity you end up with a mild sulfuric acid solution," according to Tnemec coating consultant Dan Anderson. "That's one of the chemicals a protective coating system is designed to protect against."

    Anderson cited the example of the 650 megawatt William Station power plant which burns approximately 230 tons of coal per hour when operating at full load. In the 1980s, the plant's owner, South Carolina Electric and Gas, initiated a program to extend the service life of industrial coatings used to protect its coal conveyors and stacker/recycler. Two coating systems were specified representing thousands of gallons applied over a several year period to structural steel supporting the conveyors.

    Structural steel on the conveyors was primed with Series 530 Omnithane, a moisture-cured, aromatic urethane for marginally prepared steel that provides excellent resistance to abrasion, moisture, chemicals and corrosion. An intermediate coat of Series 27 F.C. Typoxy, a polyamide epoxy, was used as a tie-coat under Series 73 Endura-Shield, an aliphatic acrylic polyurethane.

    An alternate coating system used on new equipment consisted of Series 90-97 Tneme-Zinc, an advanced technology, moisture-cured, zinc-rich aromatic urethane primer that was shop-applied. Series 113 H.B. Tneme-Tufcoat, a waterborne acrylic epoxy, was field-applied as an intermediate coat, followed by a topcoat of Series 30 Spra-Saf EN, an acrylic polymer with long-term corrosion protection and weathering properties. The dry-fall characteristics of Spra-Saf EN help reduce the potential of overspray on surrounding equipment.

    Both coating systems were selected for their resistance to the corrosive humid and saltwater environment of the plant's location near Charleston, South Carolina, as well as chemical attack from sulfur dust and abrasion from coal. "The top portion of the conveyors have a galvanized cover to protect the conveyor belt, but inside the conveyor is open to the elements," Anderson noted.

    After more than 20 years, a visual inspection revealed very little corrosion, only slight fading of the coating finish and minimal maintenance related to the condition of the coated steel. Based on their proven performance, Tnemec coating systems continue to be specified at coal-fired power plants across the country. "Right now, we're in the middle of specifying coating systems for 20 conveyors at six different plants," Anderson added. "Some of the conveyors are 300 to 400 yards long." This prevents a tree growing through your car your car 30 years from now.. Think about it

    Press Release Arc
     
  10. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,624

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    Hey, Pat, you're the Master Series guy, right? I did a 57 Chevy with your primer and clearcoat, using the car's color basecoat in between. That stuff is really tough, and has held up well over the last 20 years or so. Haven't seen the car itself lately, but a friend has. daryl 007.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Mahty likes this.
  11. 392
    Joined: Feb 27, 2007
    Posts: 875

    392
    Member

    I used truck bed coating. I can’t remember brand etc but it turned out killer.
     
  12. Pats55
    Joined: Apr 29, 2013
    Posts: 160

    Pats55
    Member
    from NJ

    Yes I am the master series guy. Congratulations you just won the grand prize!Would you like a can of paint or a gallon of our world-famous rust remover I appreciate you sticking up for me give me a call and let me send you the grand prize lol
     
  13. Mahty
    Joined: Nov 20, 2016
    Posts: 39

    Mahty

    Man, I’m like that color matched bottom. I’m kind of in the same dilemma with my ‘60. This sure tempts me to do the same.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  14. Pats55
    Joined: Apr 29, 2013
    Posts: 160

    Pats55
    Member
    from NJ

    If you should decide to go this route. Give me a call I do have some political influence around here. Mention that your from hamb and you're the guy with the 60 Cadillac
     
    Mahty likes this.
  15. okiedokie
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 3,485

    okiedokie
    Member
    from Ok

    Just Some additional input, you can paint over Lizard Skin although I don’t know if just any paint is ok.
     
  16. When I built the Ranch Wagon I had a lot of new metal in the floor and I bought 8 large rattle cans of black undercoating at the local parts house, I covered the entire floor area including the original metal that wasn't repaired.

    I had the car off the frame so it was pretty easy to do, protected the bare metal and it looked much better. HRP
     
  17. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 3,309

    jnaki






    Hey 4,

    When I bought my 1965 red El Camino, one of the first things I did was to go to this place in Los Angeles to get an undercoating applied. It was an old garage set up with a lift. The El Camino was up high enough for the guy to apply the undercoating with a spray gun. The El Camino came with factory undercoating, but compared to this spray-on application, the factory one looked and felt like sandy, house paint.
    upload_2019-5-17_6-4-17.png
    It took a while for the guy to spray inside of the fender wells and up into the far reaches of the underside of the pickup bed. Afterwards, the road sound was so much quieter and the El Camino felt somewhat sound proof/protected. I used it in rainy weather, deep desert sand, snowy weather and in salt water shoreline areas. A good $.25 cent spray wash machine kept the surface clean and tidy after driving anywhere. Whenever there was a lot of mud caked onto the undersides, the power wash spray did the job.
    upload_2019-5-17_6-4-49.png vnak photo
    Jnaki

    The only thing was that the thick spray was so good, but very smelly. It took several weeks, inclement weather and spray washes to finally get the smell down to normal levels and then gone for good. But, protection for the car against salt water, road stuff and spray? It did an excellent job. It was a lot more than the normal stuff you can apply yourself. It was a job I would not do, even with saving money at the time. Plus, the spray gets into areas that would be difficult to get to if done by hand or brush. (and…I can’t imagine getting the stuff off of your hands or clothing when finished.)

    12 years later and 125k miles of driving all over California and Mexico, I sold the 65 El Camino to some guy in Dana Point. I had used the local spray wash to get the undercoating clean before selling it. The surface looked as solid as it did 12 years earlier, just not as black as the original application.

    The buyer was impressed with the solid application of the undercoating. He was a surfer and a boater, so backing the El Camino down the ramp to the harbor’s salt water was a weekly thing, coming up.

    EXTRA:

    My neighborhood friend’s 1964 El Camino did not get the factory undercoating. We grew up in the Westside of Long Beach and if we never went to the beach shorelines or harbor waters, salt was not a deal breaker. But, that 64 El Camino was an ordinary street driven, work car and over time, the undersides began to show rust. The normal rain, standing puddles, car washes, etc. tend to do stuff to untreated metal.


    Compared to my 1965 undercoated El Camino, his was a nice looking El Camino with the factory silver style paint, but when he raised the rear for a heavy load, the undersides were all rusty. In contrast, my 1965 red El Camino was totally black underneath and gave off a nice appearance, with air in the rear shocks or not.


     

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