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Hot Rods PAINT EXPERTS I HAVE A ?????

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Todd's Rod's, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. Todd's Rod's
    Joined: Dec 11, 2010
    Posts: 163

    Todd's Rod's
    Member
    from MInnesota

    What color paints do you use to paint traditional flames? Please be specific on the color and a picture would be greatly appreciated. I plan on adding flames to a project I want them to stand out but still remain the traditional look. Thank you.
     
  2. zzford
    Joined: May 5, 2005
    Posts: 1,780

    zzford
    Member

    I always went from yellow to orange to red, from the front of the flames to the back. Paint the yellow first, then add the orange, ending in red. Then a blue pinstripe to finish them off.
     
    Fordor Ron likes this.
  3. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 39,702

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    In the 70s, on TV, this was traditional flames....

    :)

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. The flames on that car have nothing to do with TV. Manuel flamed it before it was considered for the movie or given the name the California Kid and it was based on a number of historic cars.

    https://www.peteandjakes.com/flame-history/
     
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  5. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 39,702

    squirrel
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I know. But seeing it on TV over 40 years ago was my introduction to the glorious world of traditional hot rods.
     
    0NE BAD 51 MERC likes this.
  6. Got it. Your comment just made it sound like it was TV's interpretation of a traditional flame job.
     
  7. buffaloracer
    Joined: Aug 22, 2004
    Posts: 662

    buffaloracer
    Member
    from kansas

    Tom Mc's roadster got me started on flames.
     
    pitman likes this.
  8. Gene's '40 has always been my idea of decent old time flame colors.
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. The Shift Wizard
    Joined: Jan 10, 2017
    Posts: 925

    The Shift Wizard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You can't go wrong with this advice. I've also seen it start with white and fade into yellow/orange/red/etc. It's hard to mess up and easy to visualize and explain to painters or helpers. I suggest you Google search "flame paint job images" to review dozens of styles and examples. There's a lot of wild stuff way out on the fringe but you will be able to identify many in the traditional, core style. Just separate the sheep from the goats and you'll have your answer. "Pictures are worth a thousand words."
     
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  10. oldolds
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 2,437

    oldolds
    Member

    Do you want specific color manes and paint manufacture? That will be hard to define.

    I think all "graphic" colors are dependent on the color they are being applied over. I.E. I don't think you would put the same red, yellow, orange color combination of flames on a blue car that you would put on a green car or a black car. You might still go with the traditional red yellow, orange, but it will be different shades of those colors.
    Every car I ever had pinstriped the paint was never straight out of the can. They always mix something in it. I may have told the artist what colors I wanted, but it is just a guide. I let them do as they see fit, as long as it is about what I want.
     
  11. White
    Yellow
    Red

    I like a little white, you may not.
    Blending the colors gives you orange.
    Blue pinstripe sets it off especially on a black car.

    It's the layout of the flame licks that change eras
     
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  12. catdad49
    Joined: Sep 25, 2005
    Posts: 2,111

    catdad49
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The first car that came to mind was Bob McCoy's sedan. Pretty basic and if I remember correctly, they were blended using rubbing compound. The two examples presented above are also nicely done. Yes, the McMullen roadster would also be worth a look. Specific colors will be harder to pin down, good luck to you.
     
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  13. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 3,415

    indyjps
    Member

    Never laid flames, you asked for experts, but...do you have a mixing bank. Lots of fade, requires lots of color variation.
    If you dont mix your own, get a red, yellow, orange in your favorite paint and mix some mids in between.

    Lets see what you come up with.
     
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  14. deathrowdave
    Joined: May 27, 2014
    Posts: 971

    deathrowdave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from NKy

    These are done in my driveway , gold base candy yellow , candy orange , candy red , green outline . May not be the best layout , but I did it , no funds for pro to do it , babies needed shoes .
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Todd's Rod's
    Joined: Dec 11, 2010
    Posts: 163

    Todd's Rod's
    Member
    from MInnesota

    Thanks looks great thanks again for the information and color variations
     
    henryj1951 likes this.
  16. flamedabone
    Joined: Aug 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,190

    flamedabone
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I like to sneak a tiny bit of white in at the leading edge.

    [​IMG]

    But, I don't like any of my flame jobs, so don't listen to me.

    -Abone.
     
  17. The Shift Wizard
    Joined: Jan 10, 2017
    Posts: 925

    The Shift Wizard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You said "traditional". To me that suggests non-metallic, opaque solids.
    I do like what Deathrowdave did a lot, though. It has the classic influence and style but with more modern metallics. Very tasty...... and classy. You can always do something that is true to tradition but with your own twist added. In fact, you really should.
     
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  18. henryj1951
    Joined: Sep 23, 2012
    Posts: 2,246

    henryj1951
    Member
    from USA


    RIGHT on(as usual)
     
  19. henryj1951
    Joined: Sep 23, 2012
    Posts: 2,246

    henryj1951
    Member
    from USA

    Fire,then GLOW in the dark 28years ago fire 123.jpg glow.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2018
    31Vicky with a hemi likes this.
  20. henryj1951
    Joined: Sep 23, 2012
    Posts: 2,246

    henryj1951
    Member
    from USA

    like i said 28 years ago glow 1990.JPG Glowin the dark 1990.JPG ....
     
  21. 0NE BAD 51 MERC
    Joined: Nov 12, 2010
    Posts: 584

    0NE BAD 51 MERC
    Member


    Flames can be any color and style, but to be traditional in the sense of what is acceptable here I stick with shades of white, yellow, orange and red with blue or white stripe's. candies in those tones would also be acceptable. But a pink 32 with lavender flames not so much. The main color of your car will really dictate your choices. If I am building something that I see as traditional it will usually be black and start with either Gm appliance white or Plymouth Prowler yellow { the cleaness yellow I have ever found} hugger orange and Ford red . good luck Larry
     
  22. mercman@bulldog
    Joined: Mar 16, 2009
    Posts: 562

    mercman@bulldog
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    [​IMG][​IMG]We went with the yellow-orange-red route. But some of the best flames I’ve seen come from some wild imaginations. I don’t know what they were Smokin.


    Sent from my iPad using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  23. mercman@bulldog
    Joined: Mar 16, 2009
    Posts: 562

    mercman@bulldog
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The style on the “California Kid” is killer. Having a Black base really makes it happen. Just my humble Op.


    Sent from my iPad using H.A.M.B.
     
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  24. bigdog
    Joined: Oct 30, 2002
    Posts: 427

    bigdog
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Always did yellow, orange, red
     
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  25. BamaMav
    Joined: Jun 19, 2011
    Posts: 2,152

    BamaMav
    Member
    from Berry, AL

    On some colors, a little blue on the tips looks good, too. Not on every tip, just on about maybe half of them. Wouldn't work on a blue car, but on a black or white or red, it makes the flames stand out a bit.
     
  26. The Shift Wizard
    Joined: Jan 10, 2017
    Posts: 925

    The Shift Wizard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You're basically doing a "fade" of one color into the next. If you're handy with a spray gun and can shoot down at an angle or have an air gun, you should be singing in the kitchen. It doesn't have to be 3 or 4 steps: you could blend the colors and do 6 or 8 steps.
     
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  27. philly the greek
    Joined: Feb 15, 2009
    Posts: 1,776

    philly the greek
    Member
    from so . cal.

    Full color-3.jpg Here's a photo sequence that might help . When I did these I first painted a white base as the color yellow is quite transparent and it helps with color coverage . Next I start the fade process from light colors to darker , starting with the orange which I blended into the yellow followed by the red color . IMO it helps to use the slowest reducer possible for the temperature when doing the fades as it helps to blend from getting to much like stucco . Follow this with the clearcoat of your choice , color sand , rubout , pinstripe the edges and your done . Good luck with your project . IMG_2799.JPG IMG_2800.JPG IMG_2801.JPG IMG_2802.JPG IMG_2803.JPG IMG_2804.JPG
     
  28. Todd's Rod's
    Joined: Dec 11, 2010
    Posts: 163

    Todd's Rod's
    Member
    from MInnesota

    Thanks that really helps great looking car
     
    henryj1951 likes this.
  29. B1gDaddy
    Joined: Aug 30, 2007
    Posts: 232

    B1gDaddy
    Member
    from aladambama

    [​IMG]

    That's what legends are made of right there!
     
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