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Hot Rods Paging Pgan - Build thread for the sedan?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Boatmark, Nov 5, 2017.

  1. pgan
    Joined: Apr 7, 2009
    Posts: 188

    pgan
    Member

    Well, luck must be with me. Since last post, I color sanded the body with 1000 grit, then 1500. Then I did a first power-buff with 3M coarse compound. Two finer grits are still to come, but that black lacquer is looking pretty good already, no? no398.JPG no400.JPG
    Yesterday Anna and I filled and bled the brake system. In the meantime I reworked my hayseed one-man body-winching device, and with Anna's guiding hand, got the body lowered onto the chassis. Oh yes, I also sanded, undercoated, and painted the under-body first. It's a dirty job.
    no395.jpg But I'm obviously happy to get it done.

    no403.JPG
    Rigging's out, body's on. As we stepped back to look, Anna's comment was, "That thing sure sits right. OK, I like sedans." Good.
    Adeeos, Pat
     
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  2. goldmountain
    Joined: Jun 12, 2016
    Posts: 1,110

    goldmountain

    Tall guys need step ladders too?
     
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  3. 0NE BAD 51 MERC
    Joined: Nov 12, 2010
    Posts: 1,017

    0NE BAD 51 MERC
    Member

    It is getting closer! Big thumbs up! Larry
     
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  4. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 23,539

    loudbang
    Member

    Looks GREAT already. :)
     
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  5. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 14,390

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    It almost looks like "Our Low 1" with you standing next to it. That were a fordor too weren't it? ;)
     
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  6. Looking good! You wouldn't happen to have a part number for the thread in PCV?

    After I sell my 56 Buick I might be looking for a 32-34 Fordor project. My budget won't allow any other body style.
     
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  7. Boatmark
    Joined: Jan 15, 2012
    Posts: 237

    Boatmark
    Member

    I laughed, but wasn’t surprised at Anna’s quote. Not surprising P.G.’s wife, and B.G.’s Mom would see a half built car and comment that it “sits right”. The best build in the world looks crappy if it doesn’t “sit right”.

    At the risk of a temporary derail (I originated the thread so I get a pass?) I ran across an hour long Podcast featuring Bill Ganahl. We’ve all seen Billy the kid pop up in Pat’s writing over the years, but was interesting to learn about Bill the shop owner, car builder, & historian. Found it on YouTube - I’ll post the link if I can find it.

    Ok, resume the sedan thread.
     
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  8. okiedokie
    Joined: Jul 5, 2005
    Posts: 3,654

    okiedokie
    Member
    from Ok

    Yeah it looks good!
     
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  9. @pgan I have a couple questions on the lacquer. Is this old lacquer, new formulation (like from Hirsch) or Acrylic lacquer? and when wet sanding were you using just water or any soap or lubricant etc.

    Nice simple build....kinda remind me of how Orv Elgie details. Thanks for sharing!
     
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  10. pgan
    Joined: Apr 7, 2009
    Posts: 188

    pgan
    Member

    The paint (and thinner) is PPG black acrylic lacquer, supposedly the only color they make anymore. I get my paint, as well as my parts (such as the screw-in PCV valve--don't have P.N.) from Rick at Master Auto Parts in Sun Valley, CA. Well worth the 20-mi. drive for me. He even sells vintage model car kits. But I doubt he'll do mail-order. Yes I wet-sand with plain water, and a pad. For all my tips on prep and paint, get my book How to Paint Your Car...On a Budget. I think it's the only one still in print (CarTech Books).
    PG
     
  11. 42˚18'N 83˚09'W
    Joined: Jul 29, 2008
    Posts: 133

    42˚18'N 83˚09'W
    Member

    Very well thought out build. I'm sure it will result in a trouble free dependable ride. I have already pirated a few ideas from your experience. I have to ask about that hoist. I see the 2 uprights and I see what looks like rectangular tube and a provision for the come-a-long but how is the rectangular tube supported? Is it mounted to the garage collar ties? It appears to be easy to assemble/disassemble. A couple of pic's please.
     
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  12. pgan
    Joined: Apr 7, 2009
    Posts: 188

    pgan
    Member

    I guess I can't ignore someone who quotes Thomas Huxley (I've probably read more Aldous, but I agree with Thomas, who coined the term "agnostic"). As for my garage hoist, I'll repeat one of my father's (usually ignored) quotations: "Don't do as I do, do as I say." And I say, don't look closely at that hoist. Rube Goldberg would be ashamed of it. And for legal reasons--liability--I'm not showing any further photos of it. Those two removable poles came from the front porch of my previous house. And I've been using that hand-crank cable hoist since I was in Jr. high (my friend Wally still wants it back). I've tried others, but it's simple and reliable. And in the set-ups defense, it has pulled numerous Chrysler Hemis, GMC 6s, you name it. This, however, was the first time it's pulled a body, and that had more to do with the fixture I built inside with two long 2 x 4's tie-wrapped and hose-clamped together, attached to cross-beams screwed above the front and back windows. You really don't want to know more. Some logic went into it, fortunately with no dire consequences. Figure out something better for your own garage. Good luck.
    Pat
     
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  13. 42˚18'N 83˚09'W
    Joined: Jul 29, 2008
    Posts: 133

    42˚18'N 83˚09'W
    Member

    Thank you for the response. As a retired engineer I hope you understand my curiosity. I do have a hoist and a lift in my garage/shop but an engineering background comes with a curse. We do not seem capable of viewing something mechanical without envisioning a better mousetrap. I did enjoy the details of your parts list. Classic... and I respect your option withhold further details for all the obvious reasons. It has been my pleasure. I hope you enjoy every mile in your new old Ford. Be safe and "Happy Motoring"
     
  14. Boatmark
    Joined: Jan 15, 2012
    Posts: 237

    Boatmark
    Member

    Ok Pat, after allowances for a vacation, and for the great new blog postings on Billy’s web site taking up your retirement time, we’re all still waiting for an update on the sedan.

    We were all grooving on the progress, and withdrawals are beginning to set in . . .
     
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  15. pgan
    Joined: Apr 7, 2009
    Posts: 188

    pgan
    Member

    Mr. Boatmark, since you started this thing, I guess it's only fair to give an update and a bit of explanation. First off, I haven't been ignoring the '33. But there have been a myriad of diversions and interruptions--including work on the Spalding roadster in OR, that also hasn't been covered. Details would be complicated. Suffice to say that I decided it was more important (or pragmatic) to get work done rather than stop to take photos and write reports. No bosses; no deadlines; no pay...remember? As of right now, Marty and I are planning to show the Spalding car in "bare metal" at GNRS in Pomona in January.
    As for the '33, Since mounting the painted & rubbed body on the frame, I've been cutting and fitting two types of heat insulation on the firewall/cowl; installing wiring panel, breakers, etc.; and remounting the Vintage A/C up under the dash. I told Bill I wanted the A/C and especially its hoses to be fairly inconspicuous, so he tucked things in quite tight.
    That meant I had to figure out where and how to mount two A/C vents in the corners of the dash. Then I had to bodywork and paint the dash (I filled the center) and glove box and install it. Plus I decided to polish the Limeworks steering column, and install it along with linkage to the box.
    Things you can't see include a panel under the rear body to mount a fuel pump, filter, and pressure regulator. I've also just finished a battery mount for the right rear corner, which is getting powder coated now.
    I've wired and plumbed all my cars in the past, taking pride in doing it neatly. But none of my cars have come close to the wiring this car will require. So I've made an executive decision. I don't want to do it. Same goes for putting all the glass, channels, and regulators back in the doors and rest of the car. Not to mention hooking up and dialing-in the electronic trans and ignition. This is all the sort of stuff Bill does in his shop every day. So I told him I'm going to take the car back up there, and spend some of his inheritance to let him do it. (He already told me he didn't want anybody else doing it; and I am very tickled to have my son working on my car.) So that's a brief update. Here are some pictures:
    no404.JPG I filled the center of the stock dash, then had to trim some cowl bracing to fit the A/C vents where they are. I polished the stainless Limeworks column; Bill made the column mount and drop. I liked the Haneline gauge panel that is machined to fit the '33 dash opening, but I wanted something more unique and personal than the engine-turned insert. So I used it as a template to cut out a piece of tortoise-shell pick-guard material to match the one on my '47 Martin 000-21 guitar.
    no409.JPG For gauges I chose Classic Instruments in basic black. I like the look of the tortoise shell, over aluminum, in the shiny black dash.
    no407.JPG Bill had to shorten the glove box to fit the A/C behind it, so he added this plate and mounted the heat and air controls in it. I painted it with wrinkle finish.
    no412.JPG The Enos fuse panel has something like 25 hook-ups, plus Bill added a few more. I'll let him wire it. Also note insulation.
    no413.JPG The idea was to tuck the A/C--heat unit up under the dash as much as possible. The hoses are routed and plumbed, but all those wires need to be hooked up. The firewall insulation has aluminum on the inside (facing engine heat).
    no411.JPG I'll change the knobs to '49 or '50 Ford, but otherwise the dash and steering are done. Next will be rubbing out the doors and sending it back to South City R&C for a short "to do" list. Then back here to build a backseat frame, upholstery, final assembly, and all those "little things." See you at GNRS. Have a Merry Christmas. More later.

    Cheers, Pat
     
  16. Are you using the reduced barrier hose for the air? Looks smaller than the stuff I am working with right now.
     
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  17. Great progress!
     
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  18. John Starr
    Joined: Sep 14, 2016
    Posts: 90

    John Starr
    Member

    Man that's going to be a comfy car. I gotta be careful not to let Melissa take a ride in it; she'll never ride in mine after that!
     
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  19. pgan
    Joined: Apr 7, 2009
    Posts: 188

    pgan
    Member

    OK, I know full well how much you all love a good controversy and stating your own opinions. So I'm asking for it. Son Bill just got back from his shindig at the Yokohama Custom Car Show and his amazing trip to Bangladesh, etc. So he saw the photos of my finished dash (above) yesterday and immediately called me to ask "Dad, how could you do that?! You have ruined a beautiful '33 Ford dash." He's referring to the two A/C vents (or "louvers" as Vintage Air calls them) I installed vertically in the corners. He went so far as to compare them to dual square headlights. Believe me, I would have preferred something better, but there are few choices in vents, and even fewer location options given what's behind this dash. The main A/C outlet is in the middle, directly under the dash. The ones in the corners are to direct air up to our faces. Anna's the one who wants the A/C, and it's gotta work. One option would have been the small oval billet vents from Lokar, but (1) they're smaller, and not as effective, (2) they're billet, and (3) they're expensive. Bill thinks I should hang them under the dash. My first option is to try painting the chrome bezels at least partially (or totally) black.
    So what's you opinion?
    Pat
     
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  20. The vents do look a little street-roddy, but if it were me I'd press on and leave them as-is. In other words, they're not a deal breaker. If they work better and direct more air on a hot day and fit your budget, you have to factor in practicality. I think painting the bezels so they blend into the dash would help.
     
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  21. redo32
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,488

    redo32
    Member

    It might take "Junior" another 25 years to justify comfort over tradition. I'm with you and your wife about the breeze in your face with the windows up. Interesting the drivers side doesn't stand out being next to the instruments, but the right side stands out being all by it's self. Put a trim ring around the glove box door and add a clock to balance it out.
     
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  22. Blue Moon Garage
    Joined: Mar 1, 2009
    Posts: 278

    Blue Moon Garage
    Member

    You might consider louvers stamped in the corners. Worked for me... new tach installation 1.JPG
     
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  23. 31Apickup
    Joined: Nov 8, 2005
    Posts: 1,856

    31Apickup
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    While I don’t like to cut down anyone’s car, I have to agree with Bill on the ac vents but then again it’s your car. The car is coming along nicely.



    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  24. If anything paint them black so they visually disappear but I don’t mind the contrast as is.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  25. Put a shiny knob on the glovebox and call it good


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  26. Rice n Beans Garage
    Joined: Dec 17, 2006
    Posts: 1,431

    Rice n Beans Garage
    Member

    I would fab up something to fit in the vents when not in use, maybe ????
     
  27. pprather
    Joined: Jan 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,391

    pprather
    Member

    I would suggest painting silver a/c vent surround the same as the dash to help them disappear.
    The location should provide effective cooling, which IS important.

    Phil
     
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  28. Never2old
    Joined: Oct 14, 2010
    Posts: 536

    Never2old
    Member
    from so cal

    I really really, hate doing things twice !
    So my vote is to paint the aluminum surrounds, then they will not look billet.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  29. John Starr
    Joined: Sep 14, 2016
    Posts: 90

    John Starr
    Member

    I'm a bit conflicted; I admire people with standards, and... I admire people who defy them for a good reason. When it comes to AC, what's the point if it doesn't work like you need it to? Trim the vents in dark paint if you feel self conscious, but for goodness sake let the cool air do it's job on the long road trips ahead.
     
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  30. Dreamweaver
    Joined: Feb 26, 2003
    Posts: 1,015

    Dreamweaver
    Member

    Yep, paint the bezels.

    Us vintage hot rodders do need our AC at times.
     
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