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Old Fashion Split Wishbones

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Little Wing, Sep 15, 2009.

  1. Little Wing
    Joined: Nov 25, 2005
    Posts: 7,501

    Little Wing
    Member
    from Northeast

    Does anyone know any old Magazines with a tech on splitting your bones and making the bung end?

    YES I know they make kits but that won't work for what I need
    have access to tons of dead old cars so center links etc are no problem to come by.

    So any info anyone has pix etc,,or links to old magazine articles would be great..

    Thanks
     
  2. try a google search.
     
  3. TBone69
    Joined: Aug 21, 2007
    Posts: 821

    TBone69
    Member
    from NJ

    I remember seeing it in a magazine within the last year or so.

    Basically they used a tie rod end and tie rod sleeve. Split the bones and weld the tie rod sleeve into the end of the bone, make a bracket for the frame and pie cut and reweld the bone to the correct angle.

    I will see if I can find it tonight in the magazine pile and scan it in.
     
  4. Little Wing
    Joined: Nov 25, 2005
    Posts: 7,501

    Little Wing
    Member
    from Northeast

    I did and kept getting ones done with kits


    cool thanks

    I've been trying to see if I can find it in old Hot Rod or something
     

  5. Zombie Hot Rod
    Joined: Oct 22, 2006
    Posts: 2,453

    Zombie Hot Rod
    Member
    from New York

    I think alot of guys used to cut the end off a an old tie rod (the threaded tube with the clasp) and weld it into the end of the wishbone, then thread the tie-rod end into it.
     
  6. Little Wing
    Joined: Nov 25, 2005
    Posts: 7,501

    Little Wing
    Member
    from Northeast

    cool thats kinda what I was thinking,,after that I guess its just about lining it up straight with teh bone right?
     
  7. Gigantor
    Joined: Jul 12, 2006
    Posts: 3,825

    Gigantor
    Member

    Out of curiosity, how does this stack up in safety/durability as compared to the modern bung kits?
     
  8. F&J
    Joined: Apr 5, 2007
    Posts: 13,223

    F&J
    Member

    What Tbone69 said.

    Get back to basics and do what was done in the back yard with "free parts" back then :)

    The other old way was to leave some of the center forging and drill it out and tap threads, but that was too much work and most backyarders did not have a big tap.

    The tierod way looks great IMO
     
  9. Little Wing
    Joined: Nov 25, 2005
    Posts: 7,501

    Little Wing
    Member
    from Northeast

    I would think as long as whatever you use has enough meat that its making a good union ,,and the welding is good,,they should both be equal ,,would you not agree?
     
  10. Tsquared
    Joined: Feb 5, 2005
    Posts: 522

    Tsquared
    Member
    from Pratt, Ks.


    ZOMBIE is correct...It` very simple to do....and it`s TRADITIONAL!!!
     
  11. F&J
    Joined: Apr 5, 2007
    Posts: 13,223

    F&J
    Member

    here is my 32 with 1935 bones. It is just tackwelded until I set the final caster, then I will weld it up.

    It looks like I used a sleeve in there to take up the difference in diameters. That would help keep it straight. I think I cut off about 3-4" of the 35 bone to line up with the old welded brackets....the more you cut off the end of the bone, the bigger the inner hole will be.

    I am not changing the old hotrod side bracket to hold the bones, you can see that they have the tierod end coming in from the inside of that bracket. That gets just a bit more of the bones under the car so that you have more tire turning clearance without rubbing.
     

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  12. Gigantor
    Joined: Jul 12, 2006
    Posts: 3,825

    Gigantor
    Member

    I don't see why not. I guess it's one of those things that just because the process has been modernized does not necessarily make it better. This has got my wheels turning.
     
  13. F&J
    Joined: Apr 5, 2007
    Posts: 13,223

    F&J
    Member

    That's the problem with "catalog building".....we sometimes forget "how" a HOTROD was built. If you toss the catalogs, the car will end up looking like the old days. :) plus it's more fun doing stuff the old backyard way IMO
     
  14. Zombie Hot Rod
    Joined: Oct 22, 2006
    Posts: 2,453

    Zombie Hot Rod
    Member
    from New York

    What I've done in the past is drill a couple of holes down the length of the wishbone (on the back side), then center the tie rod and plug weld it in before welding it up around the top to make sure that it's stay centered.

    Cut the tie rod as long as you can (in most cases you can ussually just cut it in half).
     
  15. I took a piece of solid steel round stock and did some creative lathe work.
    I cut a step down on one end to match the ID of where I cut off the old wishbone, left about 1/2" of being turned to the OD of the wishbone, then set the compound to taper toward the end where the heim would be, about 1 1/2 length. I bored and threaded a hole for 5/8NF and faced off for the jam nut to have a square face to seat against.
     
  16. fab32
    Joined: May 14, 2002
    Posts: 13,985

    fab32
    Member Emeritus

    To combine the "old timey" look and safety in one package I use a Chassis Engineerings kit to put a tie rod into the end of a split bone. Just like they used to do it with a tie rod sleeve and tie rod end, and the bonus of new parts with instructions to make a foolproof installation. I know the THRILL of junkyard engineering but why would you use worn out parts when you can get the same look/function with new stuff at a very resonable price? If you have an answer to the above PM me and let me in on the secret. That way you won't have to look like your "selling out" in front of all of these macho traditional hot rodders.:)

    Frank
     
  17. Zombie Hot Rod
    Joined: Oct 22, 2006
    Posts: 2,453

    Zombie Hot Rod
    Member
    from New York

    I think the key is to find old parts that are still in good condition. I would never sugguest using an old, sloppy worn out tie rod end... Or using something for a sleeve with beat up, and stripped out threads...

    You can always run a tap through a new piece of tubing, cut a slit in it and order a new collar/ clasp, get some new tie rod ends and you've got an old looking set up that's brand new, safe and reliable.
     
  18. Tman
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 34,701

    Tman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Look at Kevin Lees coupe for another option. Welding "ball and socket" end to your bones. These are the ones that are on say a Model A steering link.
     
  19. Little Wing
    Joined: Nov 25, 2005
    Posts: 7,501

    Little Wing
    Member
    from Northeast

    Thanks everyone for all teh positive info,,though have to ask,,what is Plug welding..Think I know but ...
     
  20. dumprat
    Joined: Dec 27, 2006
    Posts: 3,133

    dumprat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from b.c.

    Welding two pieces of alloy steel together is not as esy to get right as alloy to mild. Make damn sure you use the right rod and don't dream of useing wirefeed.
     
  21. Little Wing
    Joined: Nov 25, 2005
    Posts: 7,501

    Little Wing
    Member
    from Northeast

    I can only gas weld and arc so
     
  22. Kevin Lee
    Joined: Nov 12, 2001
    Posts: 7,440

    Kevin Lee
    Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    I think it's something that is overlooked on a lot of cars. Weld in bungs and nuts are ugly to me. That happens to be exactly what I did on my roadster but when I really started paying attention I wanted to change it.

    My coupe has a split '32 wishbone with Model A ends like Tman mentioned.
     
  23. Tman
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 34,701

    Tman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    WTF????????^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Plug welding is also called rosette welding. You would have a hole drilled in the bone to get the weld to penetrate the sleeve/bung slipped inside it. Not to be used soley w/o a good perimeter weld in your case on the end of the bone/sleeve junction.
     
  24. Plus the Chassis Engineering bungs are threaded to except the tie rod ends and works great. HRP
     
  25. Kevin Lee
    Joined: Nov 12, 2001
    Posts: 7,440

    Kevin Lee
    Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    I was originally going to make my own hairpins with DOM tubing and model A ends. Planned to use the forging at the end of a Model A wishbone for the front. Everything would be fully welded in and blended to look like a solid piece.

    [​IMG]
     
  26. Little Wing
    Joined: Nov 25, 2005
    Posts: 7,501

    Little Wing
    Member
    from Northeast

    Perfect thanks ,,I was thinking that,s what Tman ment ,,like a slot to weld to
     
  27. Kevin Lee
    Joined: Nov 12, 2001
    Posts: 7,440

    Kevin Lee
    Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    I ended up changing direction for now. This is a '32 wishbone split and lengthened with sections of '40 radius rod and Model A rod ends welded directly to the ends.

    The hairpins from the previous post will eventually be finished and chromed. Same measurements as this split wishbone so will be a direct swap once they are done.

    All old parts and put together with a super evil wire feed welder.

    [​IMG]
     
  28. oldtime
    Joined: Oct 18, 2008
    Posts: 27

    oldtime
    Member

    The way I've done it is to cut the tie rod about a foot loong, drill the end of th bone so the tie rod is a good fit. Then drill a 3/8 hole through both the bone and the tie rod, put a grade 8 3/8 bolt through both parts, put nut on, tighten then weld the bolt and nut to the bone and weld the end of the bone, just a little insurance.

    Old Time
     
  29. Kevin Lee
    Joined: Nov 12, 2001
    Posts: 7,440

    Kevin Lee
    Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Yeah, I would maybe slot the bottom of the wishbone pretty heavily and clamp the split tie rod in place then weld through the slot. Somewhere around three or four inches - you're not going to break that. The tie rod would be centered as viewed from the top, but you would then have a spot to fill on the open end of the wishbone either above the tie rod. This was fairly common and to me, looks cool.

    All kinds of stuff was done and it all looked cooler than weld in bungs with nuts. I used the cut off ends of old spindles as frame mounts.
     
  30. Little Wing
    Joined: Nov 25, 2005
    Posts: 7,501

    Little Wing
    Member
    from Northeast


    so the the side of the bone ( were you make the slot ) is the plane so to speak that you are lining everything up on ,right?
     

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