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noisy elec fuel pumps

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by tin_indians, Aug 9, 2013.

  1. tin_indians
    Joined: Aug 1, 2011
    Posts: 119

    tin_indians
    Member

    Are these things dependent on good voltage to run quietly? I had a Holly "Red pump" in my car...sounded like an idling chain saw. Switched to a Carter P40-70 that was supposed to be near silent. Stated out fairly quiet but by no means near silent. After running for an hour or so, its loud now too. Both pumps were rubber mounted. The only thing I could think of was maybe my wiring has too much resistance?
    I'm running a '54 Pontiac that's been converted to 12V.
     
  2. aerocolor
    Joined: Oct 7, 2009
    Posts: 1,170

    aerocolor
    Member
    from dayton

    I`ve used Holley pumps for years. Black, red or blue pumps.
    If they don`t make a lot of noise, you`re out of gas or they aren`t working....

    Seriously, they are always noisy but do run a relay to stop the wierd pulsing sounds they make with voltage drops such as turn signals or other accessories.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. 325w
    Joined: Feb 18, 2008
    Posts: 5,415

    325w
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    As said good ground good relay some 12 ga. Wire and rubber mount. If you can run a stock style mechanical.
     
  4. 35WINDOW
    Joined: Jul 7, 2005
    Posts: 454

    35WINDOW
    Member


  5. saltflats
    Joined: Aug 14, 2007
    Posts: 10,378

    saltflats
    Member
    from Missouri

    Maybe its sucking air.
     
  6. Sting Ray
    Joined: Mar 24, 2012
    Posts: 946

    Sting Ray
    Member

    I have a Holley and it buzzes but you hardly hear it due to loud exhaust.
     
  7. I had a Holley blue on an O/T car and the noise drove me nuts after a while. I switched it out last year for a new style Holley pump. The new ones are a gear type pump, not a vane pump. It's way quieter (although there is still some noise) and minimized the amount of re-work I had to do to the lines.
     
  8. aerocolor
    Joined: Oct 7, 2009
    Posts: 1,170

    aerocolor
    Member
    from dayton

    They actually get quiet when empty.
     
  9. FalconMan
    Joined: Sep 9, 2008
    Posts: 1,336

    FalconMan
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Minnesota

    I fought the noise and finally put an in-take pump. Best thing ever .....
     
  10. GassersGarage
    Joined: Jul 1, 2007
    Posts: 4,729

    GassersGarage
    Member

    I always found them to be noisy but better than the cheap S&W pumps. Now I run a mechanical fuel pump since all I do is cruise. Even with a 500 hp 454 with dual quads, it was enough to feed it.
     
  11. stimpy
    Joined: Apr 16, 2006
    Posts: 3,547

    stimpy

    vane pumps are always noisy , you should hear the ones we use on the semis to pump product , teeth rattlers we call them , and when there quiet its either the line is empty or it broke , the mallory gear type pumps are a lot quieter ...
     
  12. I don't know about this set up. These pumps are pushers,not a suckers .I've always installed this type of electric pump setups level with fuel cell outlet connection.

    Electric fuel pumps are always noisy anyways.;)
     
  13. Maybe not a good example of proper mounting ;)Better read this - Holley's instructions for that pump!
    The best location for mounting any electric fuel pump is the rear of the vehicle. The inlet and outlet of the pump must be mounted below the lowest point of the tank. This is necessary to allow for an adequate fuel supply. The pump is designed to push fuel and not designed to suck fuel out of the tank. It needs to be gravity-fed or if it’s pulling from the top of the tank, it needs to develop a siphon feed to the pump. The pump should be mounted on the chassis, in a vertical position with the pump motor on top. Avoid exposure of the pump and fuel lines to moving parts and to any hot areas, such as the exhaust manifold.
    The pump should not be mounted in a closed area, such as the vehicle’s trunk.
     
  14. Yeah, mine too. Its noisy as hell when you turn on the ignition, but after my engine kicks off with the noisy exhaust, the engine is all I hear.
     
  15. 55chieftain
    Joined: May 29, 2007
    Posts: 2,186

    55chieftain
    Member

    If you can hear your fuel pump your engine isn't load enough.

    If your running deadhead (no return) they can get pretty laod. Running a return system will quiet it down quite a bit , also help with vapor lock.
     
  16. Your mufflers are too efficient.
     
  17. aerocolor
    Joined: Oct 7, 2009
    Posts: 1,170

    aerocolor
    Member
    from dayton

    I just removed a return system from my O/T Camaro.
    It surged like a blower at idle using a black race pump and pop off valve set at 7psi through the fuel log. Now deadheading the pump and the idle is constant. I wondered whether the 1/2" line was too big causing cavitation. Never know now but the system was a plumbers nightmare.
    The pump isn`t any quieter.
     

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  18. mustang6147
    Joined: Feb 26, 2010
    Posts: 1,847

    mustang6147
    Member
    from Kent, Ohio


    I had a BG280 she hummed, but most of the noise was from being rigid mounted. It radiated through the floor boards. The noise didn't matter cuz I only heard it before I fired the engine. I was runnin 15 to 1 compression with open exhaust....

    If I ever did do it and didn't want the noise I would put some rubber between the pump and mount to reduce vibration noise
     
  19. I mount them on rubber,,no noise. HRP
     
  20. I am changing my Holley Red to another on just like it. I had poor fuel delivery last week and my suction line was kinked. My pump is 8 years old ad has had a hard life. I am also going to upgrade my fuel lines. I use .125" cloth impregnated rubber for mounting, and I do not find the pump loud.
     
  21. JeffB2
    Joined: Dec 18, 2006
    Posts: 8,577

    JeffB2
    Member
    from Phoenix,AZ

    A couple of solutions that have been used in the past: Cut a strip from a truck tire sidewall and use it as an insulator behind the bracket,also run about 2 feet of braided flex line off the pressure side of the pump this will dampen the vibration from a solid hard line which creates a harmonic vibration.
     
  22. tin_indians
    Joined: Aug 1, 2011
    Posts: 119

    tin_indians
    Member

    Well I guess I need to cut the exhaust off then. I'm running the factory straight 8 with a single exhaust through a 3 foot long tubular muffler as was what the factory installed. The motor is fairly quiet. I guess its either go back to the engine mounted cam driven factory fuel pump, or an in-tank pump, or just suck it up and deal with the noise.
    Thanks for the replies guys.
     
  23. fatkoop
    Joined: Nov 17, 2009
    Posts: 712

    fatkoop
    Member

    I've had Carter pumps on 4 cars. All mounted in rubber. All noisy as hell. Never had one fail, ever. Most are at least 10 years and many, many thousands of mile old. The noise is well worth it.
     
  24. Pa G.
    Joined: Sep 1, 2012
    Posts: 56

    Pa G.
    Member
    from CT

    Fatkoop,Did you run the Carters with a return line or in a deadhead configuration?
     
  25. Hogman
    Joined: Nov 22, 2011
    Posts: 193

    Hogman
    Member
    from Dallas, TX

    If the pump is too noisy, your exhaust mufflers are too quiet.
     
  26. 51custom
    Joined: Feb 15, 2011
    Posts: 102

    51custom
    Member

    I used Carter pumps forever, they work very well. A bit noisy, I rubber insulate between the frame and pump...
    Jim
     
  27. 1971BB427
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 6,065

    1971BB427
    Member
    from Oregon

    Had issues with my electric pump being too loud also, and I thought I had the mount isolated well with a 1/4" of rubber between the frame and the pump. But what I didn't consider was the bolts going through the mount and into the frame weren't really isolated around the bolt shank.
    I pulled it off and drilled the mount out, so I could slip 1/4" rubber hose over the bolt shank also, and then bolted it all back together. It really isolated the noise from the bolt touching the metal. I made sure I had rubber on both sides of the mount,; under the washers, and between the mount and the frame. I also used nylock nuts so I could snug the bolts down without cranking them so tight that they transferred more vibration.
    Doing all this reduced the noise to less than half of what I had before.
     
  28. sunbeam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2010
    Posts: 5,017

    sunbeam
    Member

    Use a solenoid or pulse style pump. It's a shame S&W guit the old 240a
     
  29. tin_indians
    Joined: Aug 1, 2011
    Posts: 119

    tin_indians
    Member

    1971BB427....That's a good idea, running a bit of rubber hose over the bolt shank. Maybe I'll just redo all the mounting points again. I have rubber grommets where the pump mount connects to the pump. I'll re-drill all the holes to accommodate rubber sleeves over any bolt shank, and try to find some sheet neoprene to create a separation between the mount and frame, and mount and pump.

    Is it possible for the fuel line to resonate against the frame?
     

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