Register now to get rid of these ads!

Technical New to body work - help!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 41Helen, Dec 21, 2021.

  1. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    Hey all,

    Pretty new into Hot Rods and have never attempted something like this. I don't really have an old head to lean on and bounce ideas off around, so I am hoping some of you will be willing to help! I have a 41 Chevy Business coupe that I am "attempting" to take down to bare metal and correct body/metal work and then re-paint. At the end of the build I want a matte black finish, so the top layer on it now is what I am after. Do I have to take it down all the way to bare metal? Or just attack the problem areas like in Picture 1, fix those, and then respray the top coat?

    As you can see in the pics the car has a few layers on it (picture 2). I know it's going to be a lot of work and I have a lot of time this winter so I am not worried about that. However, there HAS to be a faster way. The 3rd picture is about 14" by 8" and it took me about an hour. I put down a layer of Stripper, scrapped it off, put down another layer of Stripper, scrapped that off, then went to town with 60 grit on the DA. Please tell me I am missing an easier way to do this!!! I don't want to pull the drivetrain as it's a perfect running driving car and I don't want to mess with that, so media blasting is out. I think elbow grease and hard work are in order.

    The 1st picture is some of the problem areas that I have on the car. Most of the top layer (I think its a Matte/Flat black primer) is in great shape, but it has a few spots like this. What's the best way to address those?

    Thank you
     

    Attached Files:

    • 1.jpg
      1.jpg
      File size:
      253.1 KB
      Views:
      346
    • 2.jpg
      2.jpg
      File size:
      486.9 KB
      Views:
      352
    • 3.jpg
      3.jpg
      File size:
      372.3 KB
      Views:
      351
    chryslerfan55 likes this.
  2. anthony myrick
    Joined: Sep 4, 2009
    Posts: 9,997

    anthony myrick
    Member

    Stripping completely will guarantee a good job. But if ya just want to fix the bad, feather and prime, that’s ok too.
    However, be prepared to have possible lifting issues if you spot it in (primer areas)
    Incompatible products, prior poor prep work.....
    Can cause wrinkling. So just be aware of that.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2021
    41Helen likes this.
  3. Squablow
    Joined: Apr 26, 2005
    Posts: 15,847

    Squablow
    Member

    Try 80 grit on the DA sander, and if you have to, lock the DA into spin mode instead of random orbital mode until you're almost all the way down to steel.

    Can you take a picture of your DA sander? I think a lot of people have a palm sander and think it's the same as a DA but it's not, a DA with 80 grit should take off a LOT more than that in an hour. Also, was your sandpaper getting plugged up with old stripper gunk? That's often an issue sanding after stripping with chemical strippers.

    Just want to cover all the bases here since you're new to bodywork, I don't want to make any assumptions since I don't know what level you're at.

    Did the stripper actually soften up the paint? How long did you leave it on? Some guys will lay the stripper down and then lay a sheet of plastic over the top, it's supposed to help it from drying out although I never do that. But stripper takes time to work, depending on what you're trying to strip off it might get softened up in 10 minutes or it might take an hour or more, hard to say.
     
    41Helen and chryslerfan55 like this.
  4. oldiron 440
    Joined: Dec 12, 2018
    Posts: 2,813

    oldiron 440
    Member

    On the aira your working it looks like it's been worked before so stripping it may mean hours and hours of redoing all the filler work. The upside is you get the opportunity to improve the bodywork and paint...
    Feathering out the bodywork from old filler to new can be tricky, the old is rock hard and difficult to blend with new fillers but it can be done.
     
    41Helen and chryslerfan55 like this.

  5. rusty valley
    Joined: Oct 25, 2014
    Posts: 3,147

    rusty valley
    Member

    Yeah, its a lot of work, thats why the pros want a lot of money. I think any areas that you have put stripper on, you are committed to go all the way to bare metal. Any original paint will not like any modern epoxy or acrylic paint, like Anthony mentioned, you may get lifting / wrinkle issues that some times dont show up for a long time.
     
    rladams65 and 41Helen like this.
  6. anthony myrick
    Joined: Sep 4, 2009
    Posts: 9,997

    anthony myrick
    Member

    If stripping. Do one panel at a time.
    Try different methods.
    Razor blades.
    Sanding.
    Chemical stripper.
    If sanding, I’ve had to use 40 grit before. Most of the time 80 grit handles it but sometimes ya have to step the grits down.
    I’ve had to use a grinder in places. Take the top layers off then finish with a DA. NO SPARKS
    For chemical. Tape up areas like jambs. Sand the area with a course grit. Apply the stripper. If it jumps off quickly, scrape it. If it takes a little time, placing plastic over it helps. Wear rubber gloves, glasses, respirator and ventilate the area.
     
    41Helen and chryslerfan55 like this.
  7. JR-69
    Joined: Nov 21, 2021
    Posts: 6

    JR-69
    Member

    As Rusty Valley mentioned if you already started using chemical stripper the paint around those areas won't be happy.

    If you want to dry strip it, try a barrel drum sander like Eastwood's couture SCT. Worth the money and works really well.

    Personally, I never touch bare metal with anything harsher then 150grit. if you use 40/60/80 or whatever you will then need to go over the metal again with a finer grit to remove those deep scratches before primer otherwise they will show underneath if your material shrinks..

    You can use a harsher grit to remove most of the material but when close to bare metal I switch to 150 or 220 if the area is clean.
     
    41Helen, loudbang and chryslerfan55 like this.
  8. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 607

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    41Helen likes this.
  9. evintho
    Joined: May 28, 2007
    Posts: 2,016

    evintho
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    If you're going to strip it down to bare metal, these work great!
    Blackhawk strip discs

    Chuck one into a 4-1/2" grinder and it rips right through layers of paint, rust, whatever. I bought the above 5-pack and wound up using only 3 discs. Took me about 4 hours to strip the entire car!

    baremetal7 (2).JPG
     
    klleetrucking, 41Helen and loudbang like this.
  10. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 9,097

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    Whatever you do to remove the paint, the bare metal needs to be sealed at the outset, use a 2k based etch primer et al otherwise any subsequent porous 1k paint will allow the finish to rust from underneath.
     
    loudbang and 41Helen like this.
  11. inthweedz
    Joined: Mar 29, 2011
    Posts: 454

    inthweedz
    Member

    I stripped a 39 Chev coupe in a day, using a heat gun and a wide blade scraper, don't get the panel too hot, move to scraping when the paint starts to bubble, and keep the gun moving..
    Then finish off with an orbital sander to take it back to shiny steel all over..
     
    loudbang and 41Helen like this.
  12. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 6,023

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    I strip ALL the paint off any project I'm working on. You never know what's underneath, that will ruin your paint job. Now I use paint stripping disc, like eventho mentioned. A 4 1/2' grinder is good for lots of other duties, so it's a good investment.
     
    loudbang and 41Helen like this.
  13. Scrapin’Metal
    Joined: Mar 19, 2018
    Posts: 91

    Scrapin’Metal

    There are many variables that can change what you are doing.
    First are you just looking at cleaning up some rough areas and feather edging or stripping the whole car.
    Some of the new sandblasting process work well on a complete car and pretty fast.
    If just small areas the strip it discs work well with the proper tool.
    Looking at the pictures it looks like at one time they did a sink primer and possibly epoxy coating and that some tin me is tough.
    i stripped a whole car with strip it disc in a full day getting ready for a 80 Grit DA then 150.
    Worked well on a enamel respray and OE paint.
     
    loudbang and 41Helen like this.
  14. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,898

    alchemy
    Member

    See all the rust under those areas you stripped? That needs to be removed completely to guarantee a finish that's going to last. You can grind til the cows come home, but that will only be on the surface. Rust makes pits as it eats into the metal, and the remaining rust down in the pits will come back some day and either bubble up the paint, or eat through to the other side.

    You will have a bunch of guys tell you all about the wonderful chemicals they use to "convert" the rust to some magical black coating that will never come back. Take the advice of those snakeoil salesmen if you must. I never do.

    You can either use some chemicals like naval jelly or its modern equivalent that will dissolve the rust, or do as I do and sandblast it out. Excessive grinding to get down to the bottom of the pit will just make all that metal as thin as the metal under the pit.

    If you want paint that will last, it needs to be done.
     
    rladams65 and 41Helen like this.
  15. Happydaze
    Joined: Aug 21, 2009
    Posts: 1,274

    Happydaze
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Those roundish lumps are poorly filled holes where the 41 Chevy fender top detail trims reside. The rust pockmarking resembles the shape and placement of those pieces. If they are to remain filled then cutting the bad bits out and redoing is probably easier and quicker than trying to work with what is there, if you have the knowledge, skills and equipment (or substitute, with money or talented friends).

    Big problem is that there's a boat load of those trims all over the 41 (especially the Special Deluxe) and yours looks to have had a major delete in that regard, so further digging is likely to reveal more of the same. Not the end of the world but it could feel a bit that way! If you were able to do the legwork (step drill the holes and make up the round sheetmetal plugs) a good friend with a tig welder would have them sorted quite easily.

    Chris
     
    loudbang and 41Helen like this.
  16. KenC
    Joined: Sep 14, 2006
    Posts: 716

    KenC
    Member

    I'm doing my 56 Dodge PU now. Similar issues, several coats, old bodywork etc. After doing the front fenders and doors I've finally found the best method for this one. Heat gun, razor blade in a good holder and followup with the stripping disk on 4.5" grinder. Finish small hard to reach places with coarse surface conditioning disk on a die grinders.
     
    loudbang and 41Helen like this.
  17. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    I think that's my main fear, I don't want to do something that will cause me more anguish down the road! That's why I am just going to metal, then I know it's right and I can only blame myself if something is off haha.
     
    anthony myrick likes this.
  18. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    Thank you for the detail this is awesome!

    So newbie mistake and I know better, I have a palm sander, not a true DA. I know the difference and just always call it a DA because I am a moron haha. My sandpaper was getting plugged quite often.

    The stripper did soften the top layer or two. I left it on for 15-20 mins as the bottle says. Some of it was drying out already, some was still wet. I took a plastic edging tool to scrap it off with a layer or two of paint but not much, then went to town with the palm sander. It seemed to work better if I let the stripper dry out, is that not the correct way?
     
    loudbang likes this.
  19. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    Haha that's all I was saying internally while I was working on that tiny spot! A good body man is worth every penny.
     
  20. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,885

    squirrel
    Member

    If the stripper is the type that is commonly available now, instead of the old stuff that really worked, you might want to cover it with Saran wrap and let it sit for hours...at least that's what I've read....it doesn't work very well, and needs a lot of time, while still wet, to work.

    might want to do some more research on this topic. I've used the old style stripper several times over the past decades, it worked pretty well, but those times are now gone.
     
  21. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    Thanks for the tips. I was going 40 or 60 grit (testing to see what responded better), then 100 grit, then 220 once I have the area almost done.
     
  22. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    First off, love the car!

    I have a couple of these discs but I wasn't sure about using them on the car. Did you do anything else before you started attacking it with this?
     
  23. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    How soon after stripping do I need to seal?
     
  24. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    I am going to pick this stuff up today and give that a try too. Can't hurt!
     
  25. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    This is my course of action tonight! Thanks for that!
     
  26. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,885

    squirrel
    Member

    That depends. We can't see your location in your profile, so we can only guess where you are. It looks green....so probably somewhere where there's moisture in the air....so my southwest desert advice to keep it indoors and seal it whenever you get around to it, is probably not going to help you.
     
    41Helen likes this.
  27. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    Thank you for the tip on naval jelly or just blasting specific areas of rust pits!
     
  28. Squablow
    Joined: Apr 26, 2005
    Posts: 15,847

    Squablow
    Member

    The palm sander isn't going to do much, and a plastic scraper isn't going to work nearly as well as a razor blade on a handle or even a sharpened metal scraper. That will help a lot.

    But if you're going to try those grinder discs, skip the stripper all together. It'll just gum up the works. Sanding and stripping works best when the paint is bone dry, any kind of gummyness will ruin the paper.

    If you've got a big air compressor, invest in a real DA sander. They're not real expensive and they take off a lot more than the palm sander will. It takes a lot of air to run one properly though.
     
    41Helen likes this.
  29. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    I was afraid of this when I saw all the trim my car doesn't have versus all the trim a "normal" 41 has haha! Luckily I work in a metal fab shop (I mostly MIG) and have buddies that are expert TIG welders so it shouldn't be a problem getting the metal fab knocked out and doing it right!
     
  30. 41Helen
    Joined: Sep 26, 2021
    Posts: 86

    41Helen

    Thank you for this course of action!
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.