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Technical NEED NEW OIL FILTER, WHERE CAN I FIND ONE

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Sactownog, Jul 27, 2018.

  1. Sactownog
    Joined: Jan 19, 2018
    Posts: 249

    Sactownog
    Member
    from SAN DIEGO

    Can someone help find a replacement oil filter for my 1933 Dodge with 1953 230 flathead 6 engine?
     

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  2. KJSR
    Joined: Mar 7, 2008
    Posts: 2,455

    KJSR
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Utah
    1. Utah HAMBers

  3. flyin-t
    Joined: Dec 29, 2004
    Posts: 1,375

    flyin-t
    Member


  4. Truck64
    Joined: Oct 18, 2015
    Posts: 4,830

    Truck64
    Member
    from Ioway

    '53 Flathead 6? I'd think AutoZone should have that.
     
  5. G & G Moparts, Colton, California. Talk to Roger at (909)825-1231.
     
  6. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,096

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Do as 36-3window says and get a Wix 51035 cartridge. Probably available at your neighborhood auto parts store. Plop it into that canister and refill the engine. Make sure to use the new gasket for the lid that should come with the cartridge.
     
    Tim likes this.
  7. maybe there is a number on the old filter? compare whatever you get to the old one
     
  8. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,096

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Maybe he doesn't understand that the cartridge inside the canister is what gets replaced. He may think the whole thing is disposable. He's new to old cars.
     
    Tim and XXL__ like this.
  9. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 29,796

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

     
  10. seb fontana likes this.
  11. 37 caddy
    Joined: Mar 4, 2010
    Posts: 403

    37 caddy
    Member
    from PEI Canada

    should be a number on the old one,open it up and look the old cartridge over should be a group of numbers the parts shop can cross over to a good number to fit it. harvey
     
  12. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,096

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Hmmm. Well maybe I don't understand old cars. That's the dumbest canister filter I've ever seen. Why make something that's so hard to change? I would think Wix would want to make it easy to change their filters.
     
    ClayMart and XXL__ like this.
  13. czuch
    Joined: Sep 23, 2008
    Posts: 2,688

    czuch
    Member
    from vail az

    Just between you and me, you should change the oil more often.
    Couldn't help that one.
    The little lubeguzinta on the dizzy shaft I s a sore spot with me. I learned about those the hard way.
    So much so, that when I worked in a parts store in the early 80's I took them out of every core I could.
    Heck, I even still know where they are.
     
  14. Sactownog
    Joined: Jan 19, 2018
    Posts: 249

    Sactownog
    Member
    from SAN DIEGO

    the canister does not come apart, the top does not screw off, I have been told this filter is NON - REFILLABLE and that the whole canister has to be replaced, it is not a spin off top.
     
    seb fontana and flyin-t like this.
  15. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,604

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    The picture looks like the throw away filter where you replace the whole thing.

    Back in the day you had the choice of 3 filters - none, the one you have, and the most expensive option, the canister filter with the replaceable element.

    They don't make the throw away filters anymore, although they sometimes turn up on Ebay. The best option is to put on one of the canister filters where you just replace the element. Another option is the Frantz filter which uses a roll of toilet tissue for a filter element. They are more expensive to buy but they are very effective, and the filters are easy and cheap to buy.

    Any filter is better than no filter when it comes to reducing wear and extending oil change intervals.
     
  16. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,604

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Here is the filter with the replaceable element. Notice the big wing nut and removable top. Some just had a bolt instead of a wing nut, there were different brands available.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Sactownog
    Joined: Jan 19, 2018
    Posts: 249

    Sactownog
    Member
    from SAN DIEGO

    UPDATE:
    Here is the deal, I have one of the canisters that have the removable top, I fully restored it and am working on getting it connected to the car.

    My problem is figuring out how to get the stainless steel lines into these two little holes to work together, the stainless steel fittings hit when installed and make it near impossible to get the lines to connect. so I am working on either bending hard lines with fittings to work.
    but in the meantime, I am planning on finding a replacement filter that will work for a rod run coming up next week.
     

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  18. 302GMC
    Joined: Dec 15, 2005
    Posts: 6,923

    302GMC
    Member
    from Idaho

    Try AC P-209 or P-115
    Fram C-4
    If you hardline it, put a vibration coil in each tube.
     
  19. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,604

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Original lines were steel. Do you have a repair manual? The filters have to be installed a certain way to work right. The lines need to be connected to the engine in the right place. It should be no problem to connect the lines, just bend to fit?
     
    54vicky likes this.
  20. farmalldan
    Joined: Sep 4, 2009
    Posts: 141

    farmalldan
    Member
    from Duncan, OK

    Looks like you have a core plug failing. I suggest you repair it before taking Any long trips.
     
  21. Sactownog
    Joined: Jan 19, 2018
    Posts: 249

    Sactownog
    Member
    from SAN DIEGO

    by core plug, what do you mean or what are you referring to?
     
  22. Truck64
    Joined: Oct 18, 2015
    Posts: 4,830

    Truck64
    Member
    from Ioway

    Sometimes called "freeze plugs".


    "Core plugs are used to fill the sand casting core holes found on water-cooled internal combustion engines. They are also commonly called frost plugs, freeze plugs..."
     
  23. dorf
    Joined: Dec 5, 2008
    Posts: 1,087

    dorf
    Member
    from ohio

  24. farmalldan
    Joined: Sep 4, 2009
    Posts: 141

    farmalldan
    Member
    from Duncan, OK

    I am referring to the boss with the round disc in it. This is a core or freeze plug. It appears to have a rust bubble in the center of it, indicating impending failure. When it fails, you will loose all of the coolant and will be disabled.
     
    Truck64 likes this.
  25. Couple of things.........the Core Plug that's been referred to is also known as a freeze plug or welch plug...........for mopar 6's they are 1&5/8th diameter and are available in both mild steel and brass........to remove the old one you either hit a flat bladed screw driver into the centre of the old one and lever it out or screw a self tapping screw into the centre and use the screw to lever the plug out..........drain the water from the lower hose first.......ideally if one plug is leaking then all 5 along the US drivers side of the block will be thinking about leaking and its a good policy to do the lot in one go...........remove and l poke around behind where the welch plugs were to loosen the accumulated crud then stick a hose in there and wash as much crud out as you can.....repeat again.........and again.........lol.......then the plugs sit on a ledge in the block.......clean it then wipe a thin wipe of some sort of Gasket Goo around the ledge, sit the new plug against the ledge and then hit the centre of the plug(I use an old head bolt or some similar about 3/8-1/2" diameter, about 6-10" long so you can hold it and wack it ideally one solid wack with a hammer) which will flatten the plug and expand it into the ledge and its done( compare the shape of the new plug to the slightly flattened old one before removal & you will see how they should appear when installed correctly)...........I always use the brass plugs as they never rust and its done once and never again.....you should decide to do the lot, all 5, but your choice.........and to get to all 5 you will probably have to remove the generator, starter and plug leads, the dissy can usually be left in place........its a fun but satisfying job...........lol..............
    .....................as for the oil filter as others have said that's a throwaway canister......so throw it away............get a canister that takes a removable element............only issue is that there are dozens of both types and they may or may not have the oil lines in the same spot so you may or may not have to get new lines made or bend the lines to fit the new canister..........I had a 41 Plymouth that was "restored" with NO oil filter, they were an option in 1941 so that's what was done by the PO restorer..............when I got it, me, being a hotrodder I decided I wanted to go fast so I bought a Beehive Oil Filter, that's the finned round thing on the right of the pic......a fancy version of the replaceable element filter and had new stainless steel braided lines made.....it didn't go any faster but it helped to brighten the engine bay.........regards from Oz...........Andy Douglas
     

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    Last edited: Jul 31, 2018
    egads likes this.
  26. And btw there are 2 different types of plugs that I am aware of.......these convex/concave style ones depending on what side you look at them from and others that are at least here in Oz known as "Cup" style welch plugs.......the Cup ones are NOT the correct sort..........there are also bolt in type which I've seen but for me, the brass concave/convex ones are what you need...........andyd
     
  27. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 29,796

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Well it is this Dodge six_LI.jpg freeze plug, soft plug, core plug / welch plug depending on who you learned from is already shot and leaking. That means it would be real prudent to check the rest of them too.

    As far as the lines go I'd start over with new lines and either use the hose type lines designed for that or make up new steel lines to fit right. Trying to bend old lines around to work with a different filter will probably cause more grief than anything else.
     
    Sactownog likes this.
  28. I don't know if you have solved this problem yet, but it should be no problem figuring out where the oil lines are attached.
    The clean, filtered oil will be at the center of the element, so this will be the return line to the engine. Because the lines at the filter are at the center of the top and center of the bottom of the can, the best way to determine which line is the supply line, will be to disconnect the top line and turn the engine over until the oil is pumping through the lines. If the oil discharges from the top line, that is the line that goes to the outside of the element. In other words, the inlet to the filter from the engine will go to the outside of the element. This will be the pressure line from the engine.
    If I knew the dimensions of the old element, I have the books that might allow me to match your old element with a replacement Donaldson or Wix.
    Bob
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2018
    Sactownog likes this.
  29. Sactownog
    Joined: Jan 19, 2018
    Posts: 249

    Sactownog
    Member
    from SAN DIEGO

    J-Jock, thank you for all of that information I plan on using a replaceable filter canister soon, I want to find a new filter to use for now. the top line is the feed and the bottom line is the return I believe.

    My canister I have works with the car but the lines seem to get in the way if I want to use Steel Braided lines "which I purchased" already.

    on Monday next week I plan to start taking the system apart and working on putting new fittings in the engine block so I can use stainless lines with my new filter canister.
     

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