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Need advice on stainless repair

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Hubnut, Apr 22, 2005.

  1. I know there are some guys on here that are good at this, so I'm looking for some proven tricks. What I have is a set of 52 Packard side trim, the passenger side front fender spear is FLAT! It didn't come this way, looks to have been run over. The guy I got the trim from worked with it for a while last night and got alot of the shape back to it. I've heard of making wooden bucks and hammering it back into shape, my question is what type of wood and hammer to use. Are there any special files I can use to knock down high spots or do we just buff 'em out with cutting compund? I really want to save this trim since it's pretty tuff to find and kinda pricey. What do I need to know?
     
  2. Strange,,,I was going to ask the same thing,,,,,

    I have several pieces of trim that are in need of dent removal and polishing,,,,any secrets as how to do this type of work? HRP
     
  3. joerox
    Joined: Mar 1, 2005
    Posts: 84

    joerox
    Member

    that makes 3 of us...
     
  4. [size=+2]BUMP!!! to the top.

    Unk??? Metalshapes??? Anybody???

    I'd like to know myself. Perhaps someone could do a tech???

    Reverend Jake
    [/size]
     
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  5. T McG
    Joined: Feb 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,255

    T McG
    Member
    from Phoenix

    I have done extensive stainless straightening and welding, and while it is rewarding, it is very time consuming. Two things you don't want to do. 1-don't stretch it because it's almost impossible to shrink anywhere except the edges. 2-don't file the high spots. You need to very carefully move the metal back to it's original shape with whatever tool works for the shape.I have used hammers, screw drivers, picks. shaped wood or plastic,or whatever works best for you. If you do use a hammer such as a pick hammer, hit it with another hammer to better direct your hit, and work it a little at a time. Get some layout die to spray the part with, and an extra fine file. Use the file only to lightly scuff the surface going with the longest part of the trim. The file will take away the layout die on the flat part and leave the low sections that need more bumping.You don't want to try and remove file marks later, so be very carefull. A little trick I've used when working on small dents is to take some fine sand paper like 220 and lightly sand the back side of the trim where the dent is, and the dent will show up as a shiny spot that makes it very easy to see. I wish I had some thing to take pictures of to better illustrate what I am talking about , but right now I am not fixing anything. Maybe Cole will read this and let you know what magazine he was in demonstrating this process some time back. The main issue is take your time and it will pay off.
     
  6. By "layout die" are you referring to something like the thin blue stuff I remember using in a metals class?
     


  7. Try this. I think I've also seen a similar book at Barnes&Noble.


    http://www.motorbooks.com/Store/Product_Details.aspx?ProductID=7151
     
  8. T McG
    Joined: Feb 12, 2005
    Posts: 1,255

    T McG
    Member
    from Phoenix

    Yes it is in spray can form and will work better than paint. You would probably have to find it at a machinist supply or Grainger type place. You only need a light coating to show the imperfections. I also forgot to mention to back your work piece with something solid like a block of aluminum, and make sure it does not have any scratches or dings because the will transfer to your trim. You can call Barnes & Noble and ask for Jeff Lillys book called How to restore metal auto trim by Motorbooks International or call Motorbooks at 1-800-826-6600. The book is about $20. and has great info and pictures.
     

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