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Technical Need a good 47 Ford headlight switch diagram.

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by Early Ironman, Jun 20, 2017.

  1. Early Ironman
    Joined: Feb 1, 2016
    Posts: 553

    Early Ironman
    Member

    I have two wiring diagrams and neither shows how to wire up an original headlight switch for my 47 Ford truck. Does anyone have one? Or can I get a pic of how yours is wired up?
    Thanks!


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  2. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    There are letters in the plastic top of the original switch...2 B's for battery, H for headlight, etc.
     
  3. Early Ironman
    Joined: Feb 1, 2016
    Posts: 553

    Early Ironman
    Member

    Ok thanks,
    Looks like my switch is shot. About to order a new one.



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  4. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 9,049

    jimmy six
    Member

    Classic car wiring . com 14x17" laminated complete diagram including factory colors and tracers. Saved my bacon many times... All cars all years...
     
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  5. Invest in a shop manual, they re-pop most of them and I found mine on eBay for around $35.
     
  6. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    "Looks like my switch is shot. About to order a new one."
    I've opened a bunch of those...Ford used them about '41-50. All were good once cleaned! They are a lot better quality than most aftermarket repro. And no silly re-designs like operating dimmer with the dash knob, like the repro shown...
    Gently bend back the little tabs holding plastic to steel case. Do this on a clean flat surface with no cat on it, and on a paper towel so stuff doesn't bounce or roll much. Carefully lift off plastic and carefully pick out the slider stuff and springs...lay out in order on the towel. Swizzle everything clean in lacquer thinner, grease all the contact areas with light grease, and reassemble. Takes maybe 10 minutes and switch will be ready for another 70 years.
    The dimmer can also be saved this way...most are die cast, gently bulge it a bit to get apart.
     
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  7. Early Ironman
    Joined: Feb 1, 2016
    Posts: 553

    Early Ironman
    Member

    I have several shop manuals but none have an adequate wiring diagram for the headlight switch.
    I did find one diagram online after about an hour and a half of searching though. Ended up getting my switch to work after exercising it a lot.
    Will take the advice to disassemble it the renew the connections.
    Now in to figuring out how the test the armature on my generator. YouTube is a lifesaver!


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  8. Early Ironman
    Joined: Feb 1, 2016
    Posts: 553

    Early Ironman
    Member

    Thanks a lot,
    I did not think I could renew it prior to your instructions.


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  9. Budget36
    Joined: Nov 29, 2014
    Posts: 6,421

    Budget36
    Member

    For the future, Van Pelt has a lot of older Ford wiring diagrams on his site.
     
  10. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    Generator testing summary
     
  11. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    Generator parts testing, 1953 style


    Here are a series of tests for generator components from the Ford of Canada “Master Repair Manual” from 1953. They specifically apply to ’49-53 vehicles, but I believe I am correct in saying that procedures apply back to the introduction of the 2-brush generator in 1937-8. The only circuitry difference is that the first couple of years lacked a proper ground wire, grounding only through their mountings.


    Most of these tests involve 110 volt household electricity, presumably to force breakdown of any marginal 6 volt hardware. I am sure you are aware that this has potential danger if carelessly handled.

    There are many ways to test generators without this…I will post a link to some simple tests, and many of the tests can also be done using multimeters, as detailed in a number of Ford USA books. The 110 system has the advantage of testing the breakdown points under more stress than they will see in actual service.


    Equipment: The basic tester is simply a 110 volt bulb in a porcelain socket (let’s try to be traditional here!) fitted with test prods; One wire goes from plug right into fixture, as normal, the other wire is terminated with a sharp steel prod, and the empty terminal in the fixture is fitted with another length of wire also with a prod or, possibly better, a big alligator clip. When the two prods meet, either directly or through a conductive path in your generator, the bulb will light. I’ll leave the fabrication of prods and insulated grips for them up to you. This stuff was standard in auto electric shops long ago before electronics made such testing obsolete.


    I believe choice of one of the plug poles will be marginally safer than the other, and I think I know which, but I haven’t finished contemplating that and I hope someone with a sharper knowledge of 110 will step in and clarify that for me.


    Next, I will paraphrase Quinn the Eskimo, your Ford of Canada service rep, testing the components of a disassembled generator for electrical integrity:


    The series begins with a growler test. I have no growler and can’t help you there…


    Next, clamp the wire from light fixture to the armature shaft rear bearing area. Jab each segment of the armature with the prod from the wall socket. If the lamp lights during this, a segment is grounded and your armature has failed its final.

    Parenthetically, I understand that electricity flowing from one hand to the other in the case of your accidentally including yourself in the circuit is highly dangerous, as the electrical path goes right across your heart. Set up your test so that the parts are stable, hold your prod in one hand, keep the other hand in your pocket…that technique is used by many electricians when fiddling with live 110 for safety.


    Onward…to the endplate. Clamp wire to endplate casting, prod the ungrounded brush holder. Darkness is good…


    Field coil windings are tested still assembled in frame, unless trouble forces disassembly. Clamp wire to frame/body of generator, prod the field terminal. If lamp lights, field is grounded and that is not good. Field resistance is checked with a charged 6V battery, hooked with one terminal to field stud with an ammeter in circuit, other to ground stud. I do not have figures for 12V generators, but at 6V resistance should be 1 ½--2 ½ amps. High means shorts between windings, very low or no reading means open circuit.


    This battery and ammeter circuit can be used again at the end of your rebuild for a final bench test of the complete unit: Place a jumper wire between field and armature terminals, run ammeter lead to ground post, other to armature. Generator should run as a motor and draw somewhere about 5 amps.

    I hope I got all that right…will try to get multimeter type test procedures together soon.

    I’ve never done this with 110…I’ve only done continuity lamp checks with battery voltage myself. I believe the low voltage tests will show parts to be currently usable while the 110 tests will expose functional-but-weak parts that are likely to fail in the future.


    I’ve rebuilt a bunch of generators that were functional units when I started, but I’ve never encountered any of the serious problems that can occur on elderly windings. If I have something above wrong, please correct me on this! I know there are people here with much more generator experience than I have.


    Ford-Merc-Lincoln remove Field wire and touch to Batt wire momentarily; most other cars, touch jumper from Arm to Batt at regulator. For cutout 3-brush Fords, jumper between two terminals on cutout.


    2 links to Ford generator discussions:


    Polarizing your charging system is covered in the first; note that there is one way for Ford systems, another way for Delco and most other systems. MANY people have the two confused. Be sure you are doing this using the Ford/heavy duty circuit system, NOT the Delco, as ground paths are different and smoke may result…

    Both ways are in here:


    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=256038&highlight=generator+polarize&showall=1


    Simple field testing with no tech:


    Ford--clip on a jumper from A to F at reg. Revvitup to charging speed...reg is now out of service, if generator is good should produce 6 or 14 volts...or brightening of headlights if you have no meter. This is full-field test, generator vs. Reg



    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=278956&highlight=generator+polarize&showall=1
     
  12. JeffB2
    Joined: Dec 18, 2006
    Posts: 8,867

    JeffB2
    Member
    from Phoenix,AZ

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