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Projects My 1953 Advanced Design "Build"

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by StainedClass, Apr 28, 2014.

  1. StainedClass
    Joined: Apr 27, 2014
    Posts: 14

    StainedClass
    Member
    from Tyler, TX

    I was recommended to move this post to the general discussion board from the intro board, so here goes. Tell me what yall think.

    I am out of the great country of Texas. I own a 1953 Chevrolet 3100 pickup. It has been a project of mine for a few years but it's not a frame-off resto or anything. Worked performed by me, and help, little by little. So I'll post some of the "resto" process pics.
    It has an - I'll be honest - 1954 motor (oh the shame). But it was out of my hands. Somewhere in its years someone replaced the 216 dip-oiled, babbit-bearing motor for its younger brother, the tried-and-true Thriftmaster 235; No, it's not exactly how I'd prefer it, but it was probably the smartest and most welcome change that could have been made to it. (Not to insult its well-proven older brother, whatsoever.)
    I have attempted otherwise to keep it mostly all-original. Period-correct details are very important to me - White letters over the "Chevrolet" emboss on the tailgate? Incorrect! Took them off; Sheet metal bed floor? No way! Replaced with sweet, sweet wood...; Passenger side, side-view mirror? Get that crap outta here! Never had one. (And what in the world are seat belts...?)
    That being said, one HAS to put his/her own touches on their babies, right? I am a fan of the mild touches; the detailed customizations. I enjoy could-have-been period-correct customs. I replaced the painted grille for a chrome one. Added a nice little straight-pipe, split-tip side-exhaust exiting just under the running board in front of the tire; I've had (am ordering more) wide white-walls (not available on the trucks til 1955); Lowered it *just* so. Sits GREAT, I think. But still retains the old, original leaf springs. Love it.
    I've had to make it more road-worthy too. A rear-end gear change from 4.11s to 3.51s. Good choice; A tachometer "made" to match the original gauges; An electric fan to keep it cool in traffic.
    Oh yeah, I forgot to mention, it's my DAILY DRIVER! Heck-to-the-yeah. HAVE to drive 'em!

    Numerous other little things done to it to make it my own. I'll post some more pictures of my build and details.

    Questions/critiques welcomed!

    Glad to be here, gentlemen.

    - Tyler "Stained Class" Kelly
     

    Attached Files:

  2. StainedClass
    Joined: Apr 27, 2014
    Posts: 14

    StainedClass
    Member
    from Tyler, TX

    In order of pics:
    1. The original bed
    2. The frame before and
    3. After (Just a good scrape, strip and paint!)
    4. How the motor looked (roughly) when I bought it
    5. Lower cab corners were the only real rust to speak of
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Perrorojo
    Joined: Feb 25, 2011
    Posts: 357

    Perrorojo
    Member

    Well done.

    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     
  4. StainedClass
    Joined: Apr 27, 2014
    Posts: 14

    StainedClass
    Member
    from Tyler, TX

    The motor, removal and overhaul:
    None of this could have been possible without the help of the Tyler Junior College Automotive Technology program. No, this wasn't a class project or anything, but I repaired/restored/replaced what I could when we got to the section. They don't typically do things like this, but I do.;) In fact, they tend to frown on "restorations" (or pre-OBDII, for that matter). Shout out Prof. Mir Alikhan!

    Photos:
    1. Freshly plucked in its sad, more-or-less original condition
    2. The old engine bay (not the nice use of garden hose for heater hose)
    3. Freshly pulled, different view. We start to disassemble it.
    4. Cleaned engine bay (it's insane the amount of brake and carb/choke cleaner I went through. It's a wonder I'm not set back a few years, mentally.)
    5. The head, just before it was checked for cracks (with that magnetized metal powder stuff). Of course I let the professionals do my engine work. I ain't no fool!
    6. The crank: turned and balanced along with the rotating assembly
    7. My block, freshly bored. That wide "X" pattern is a thing of beauty...
     

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  5. StainedClass
    Joined: Apr 27, 2014
    Posts: 14

    StainedClass
    Member
    from Tyler, TX

    Thanks, Perrorojo!

    StainedClass
     
  6. StainedClass
    Joined: Apr 27, 2014
    Posts: 14

    StainedClass
    Member
    from Tyler, TX

    Machine work done at Ray Engine in Tyler, TX. Great place. Ray is a genius.
    Bored .060" over (for necessity, not performance), and has a little hotter cam in it from Patrick's Antiques in California.

    Photos:
    1. I debated some over what coating to use in the engine bay. I wanted something flat, for easy maintenance but also something to hold up a little more to dings or scratches. Rust-O-Leum to the rescue with their version of bed-liner, I believe. That or frame-coat. It has a nice texture (like sandpaper, kinda) and shows little imperfections. Not the greatest to clean, though.
    2. Finished steering column (not rebuilt; trust me - still has LOTS of wonderful slack).
    3. Bare, original, brass radiator. Beautiful. We covered the edges top and bottom with clear (not the fins, duh), although now I know that still may not have bee a great choice.
    4. Refinished bare metal/clear coat air cleaner and oil filter canister. Sanded with 220.
    5. Rebuilt starter
     

    Attached Files:

  7. StainedClass
    Joined: Apr 27, 2014
    Posts: 14

    StainedClass
    Member
    from Tyler, TX

    Motor re-install:

    1. The motor in primer. Reminded me of the GMC grey engine color.
    2. Factory blue. I'm not sure if this was the same blue in the "Blue Flame Six" or not (1953/54 Corvette)
    3. I had to make it my own, right? It's the little details that make perfection. Just a coat of Rust-O-Leum High Performance gloss black over the primer. Dried and taped off. Very carefully...
    4. New mounts and an "O'Reilly-special" hi-temp header paint. Put it in the oven and baked it!
    5. Installed
    6. We had a HECK of a time stabbing that distributor for some reason...
     

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  8. Nice! You've put together a really nice classic truck! Drive the wee out of it for a couple years! Then make a hot rod out of her! ;) hah
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2014
  9. tractorguy
    Joined: Jan 5, 2008
    Posts: 691

    tractorguy
    Member

    I really like the subtle, traditional way that you have done the truck. Keep it up.
     
  10. StainedClass
    Joined: Apr 27, 2014
    Posts: 14

    StainedClass
    Member
    from Tyler, TX

    PerdueSD,
    Haha, I've accomplished the first part, definitely. I've considered an Offenhauser dual intake and Fenton dual exhaust - Maybe some day... When I buy the four-speed trans...

    Tractorguy,
    That's exactly what I'm going for. Thanks a lot!
    I like to think of it as my "tractor." They weren't much more than that, right? Right down to that massive, lead weight called a "starter."

    StainedClass
     
  11. AZbent
    Joined: Nov 26, 2011
    Posts: 272

    AZbent
    Member

    Looking great. Keep going and some day you will be done. HA HA.
    Mark
     
  12. patmanta
    Joined: May 10, 2011
    Posts: 3,692

    patmanta
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Woburn, MA
    1. MASSACHUSETTS HAMB

    I think that's a great idea! The more you settle in reading on the HAMB, I think the sooner someday is gonna come.
     
  13. arkiehotrods
    Joined: Mar 9, 2006
    Posts: 6,400

    arkiehotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    My brother and I roomed together in college. We had a '53 that we paid $150 for ($75 each). It was rusty (making a left turn in water meant water up through the holey floorboard right into the left eye!)

    I was on passenger side with my bro driving and he was going down the highway 70 mph. I said "You better slow down or you're gonna throw a rod."

    He said, "Shut up, I'm driving."

    Right after that, boom, rod through the side of the block, big enough to put a fist through.

    We sold it to a policeman for $1 and bought a quart of Miller.

    That was 35 years ago, good memories
     
  14. Wow. That is a reallllll pretty truck! Great job. I love the tach!!!!!

    One question...and maybe I am an idiot. But wouldn't/shouldn't you have clamps before and after the inline fuel filter before the carb?
     
  15. StainedClass
    Joined: Apr 27, 2014
    Posts: 14

    StainedClass
    Member
    from Tyler, TX

    Arkiehotrods,
    Good times indeed! I constantly hear stories like this from onlookers of my truck in the gas stations and parking lots...

    50desotocoupe,
    Thanks man!

    Yes, there should be. When we rebuilt the motor though, I had certain details included that have since been changed or replaced. One of them was this filter that I thought was cool and I painted it to look like brass (cool while it lasted). The nipples on either end were actually a 1/16" larger than the line itself, so the fit between the two was so tight I didn't feel the need.

    Another similar custom was an in-line fuel pressure gauge that was the same color. Loved the look of both together, but the filter screwed with my pressure for some reason and the gauge was destroyed by fuel (go figure).

    Anyone have either of these things actually in brass...??

    StainedClass
     

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