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Technical Might have to cut and buff the whole truck now!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 1great40, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. 1great40
    Joined: Jan 1, 2008
    Posts: 471

    1great40
    Member
    from Walpole MA

    Some of you have seen the build thread for the 40 in my avatar over on GJ. Last summer I put a little gaff in the passenger side front fender. I still haven't had the paint fixed yet. The color is an old Ford green called Meadowmist. It's pretty forgiving color. Since the fender is going to be refinished, tonight I got out some 1000, 1500 and 2000 paper and my DA.

    I wet sanded a medium sized area with the 1000, then 1500 then 2000 and then some Meguires ultimate compound on the DA with a foam pad. I had always thought the paint on this truck looked good, and it does but what a difference the cut and buff made!

    Now I'm wondering if i shouldn't tackle the whole truck while it's still winter. I'm removing the fender to have the paint work done and that means the bumper will be off too, so that makes a cut and buff even easier. But I don't want to kid myself about how much work this could be.

    Anyone done this on an assembled vehicle before?
     
  2. ROADSTER1927
    Joined: Feb 14, 2009
    Posts: 2,936

    ROADSTER1927
    Member

    Yes, it is a lot of work but soooooo worth it! I have done it twice. Gary;)
     
  3. slammed
    Joined: Jun 10, 2004
    Posts: 8,151

    slammed
    Member

    Yes. Tape areas that are prone to be sharp or thin. When it is polished completely, bury it in glaze several times to give it deep gloss. Top w/carnauba wax or a sealant like Wizards. People will swear you painted it fresh.
     
  4. Kevinsrodshop
    Joined: Aug 22, 2009
    Posts: 590

    Kevinsrodshop
    Member

    I've done it as well. Good advice with the tape. Well worth the effort. The paint is fully cured now so it'll stay flat.
     

  5. chevy57dude
    Joined: Dec 10, 2007
    Posts: 6,705

    chevy57dude
    Member

    Another yes here. Brand new paint job in September. 1 week old, cut and buffed. Wintering in the shop here, I obsessed over every last little imperfection. Did it all over again last month, 1000 thru 2000 then 1, 2, 3 3m compound with a new pad for each on the buffer. 2 days work for 2 guys. 100% worth it!
     
  6. First off to make it less work get the right tools and products. Get a variable speed polisher...much faster than even the longest stroke da. Get a good open coat wool pad, get a good compound ( 3M 36060 perfect it ex ) than a good foam pad and some 6064 3M Perfeft it Machine polish.... Since ya have a da consider buying a box of 3M 1500 finishing film and a box of 3000 trizact...about 40% faster than wet sanding and will buff up about 50% faster.....head over to 3Mcollision.com for product info and training videos
     
  7. 54fierro
    Joined: Jul 6, 2006
    Posts: 493

    54fierro
    Member
    from san diego

    All good tips.
    And when you're done bring out in the sunlight to see all the spots you missed that need more buffing. :)
    Make sure you keep that buffing pad spinning away from the edges so it doesn't catch the end, learned that one the hard way.
    Oh, and if the little spot you're trying to buff out keeps getting bigger its probably the primer. lol

    Like was already mentioned, its lots of work. Be patient as the end result will be totally worth it.
    Cesar
     
  8. 1great40
    Joined: Jan 1, 2008
    Posts: 471

    1great40
    Member
    from Walpole MA


    Thanks !
     
  9. 1great40
    Joined: Jan 1, 2008
    Posts: 471

    1great40
    Member
    from Walpole MA

    I must have been sleepy when I was posting! I did my test by hand sanding with a foam sanding pad and then I compounded with a random orbit polisher, not my DA. I know lots of pros use a rotary buffer like a variable speed Makita but I also know a rookie like me could burn the paint job in a hurry using a tool like that.
    Also, I used 1000, 1500 and then 2000 before compounding. Some guys swear by taking it further with the sanding and doing less compounding. Any opinions on that approach?
     
  10. philly the greek
    Joined: Feb 15, 2009
    Posts: 1,865

    philly the greek
    Member
    from so . cal.

    There was an excellent in depth article in Street Rodder magazine about a year ago written by the man that does the rub outs for Bobby Alloways shop . If you can find it , it will tell you exactly the steps to getting professional results . It's not that hard , it just takes time and attention . Good luck .
     
  11. slammed
    Joined: Jun 10, 2004
    Posts: 8,151

    slammed
    Member

    Here: http://www.autogeek.net/detailingtips.html Take it 3000 grit & use a lesser 'cut' and more polish material to finish the job. Use the orbital out on the flats and large easy to reach and see area's. Use foam pads as a means to keep heat down. Ask questions now.
     
  12. J'st Wandering
    Joined: Jan 28, 2004
    Posts: 1,772

    J'st Wandering
    Member

    Do one panel of the pick-up at a time. It doesn't seem as overwelming and breaks up the process. Use a da and electric polisher where you can. Harbor Freight stuff will work. Used masking tape to protect edges.

    Neal
     

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