Register now to get rid of these ads!

Metal Shapers - Rubber Dolly Blocks

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by scootermcrad, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. scootermcrad
    Joined: Sep 20, 2005
    Posts: 12,374

    scootermcrad
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yes, giggle giggle...

    ...At the risk of this thread getting out of control, I would like some more information from anyone that has used them. Seriously, anyone use rubber dollies? How do you like them? Where and for what do you find the work best for? Anyone make their own out of (fill in type, durometer/hardness here) rubber? I could see how this might be useful. Nothing came up in a search though. I did a search on YouTube for some usage videos and, well, let's say I came up with searches that didn't really give me much technical information.

    Martin Hammers sells a set and I have been thinking of picking a couple up or maybe just trying to make a couple from some hard rubber that I have that's intended for the stamping/drawing process.

    Here's the Martin dollies, just so we're clear about what it is we're talking about... :rolleyes:

    http://www.eastwood.com/heel-dolly-rubber-coated.html

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Salt flat speed shop just posted on his plymouth build that he uses one. You might want to pm Chris and ask him.
     
  3. JeffreyJames
    Joined: Jun 13, 2007
    Posts: 16,612

    JeffreyJames
    Member
    from SUGAR CITY

    Here's a quote for TP Tools who sells a Martin Door Hammer and Rubber dolly...

    "Excellent for metal bumping and finishing. Used for auto body work to smooth out dents and dings. Rubber coating absorbs shock to reduce stretching of metal."
     
  4. scootermcrad
    Joined: Sep 20, 2005
    Posts: 12,374

    scootermcrad
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    So does that mean it's a solid forged steel dolly with just a rubber layer cast around it?

    Yeah, I saw Chris' blog (http://saltflatsspeedshop.blogspot.com/) and that's what got me thinking more about them. Was hoping to hear from some more folks that have used them.

    I remember seeing a video once on someone repairing an aluminum fender with one, but for the life of me can't remember where I saw it.
     

  5. B Lawrence
    Joined: Nov 18, 2009
    Posts: 232

    B Lawrence
    Member
    from Ham.

    Killer Product....
     
  6. Tman
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 34,430

    Tman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yes, the Martin one I tried was a coated dolly. Fairly hard and it felt like the rubber was pretty thick.
     
  7. atomickustom
    Joined: Aug 30, 2005
    Posts: 3,408

    atomickustom
    Member

    I have one and I have tried it out once or twice but I prefer metal. Maybe for aluminum or other more fragile metals it would come in handy? (And yes, it's rubber over metal. I think rubber would be too light by itself.)
     
  8. B Lawrence
    Joined: Nov 18, 2009
    Posts: 232

    B Lawrence
    Member
    from Ham.

    Thanks atomickustom....
     
  9. scootermcrad
    Joined: Sep 20, 2005
    Posts: 12,374

    scootermcrad
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Good point about the weight. Very true!

    Good info! Keep it coming guys!
     
  10. scootermcrad
    Joined: Sep 20, 2005
    Posts: 12,374

    scootermcrad
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Bump! (no pun intended)
     
  11. Those look like they may be useful, I prefer to hear the metal to metal sound.
     
  12. I've used them. Buddy has a large one for hemming door skins. They work fine, but I prefer lead. Melt some wheel weights in a muffin pan, or other suitable mold. Better than rubber, cheaper, and you can make any size or shape.
     
  13. JeffreyJames
    Joined: Jun 13, 2007
    Posts: 16,612

    JeffreyJames
    Member
    from SUGAR CITY

    These would be very useful in my case because a metal on metal is only going to stretch the metal and exaggerate the bumps and lumps that I have. With the rubber dolly I can provide something to support the area I am working white trying to raise the low areas without stretching the metal further. Or at least in my head that makes sense haha!!!
     
  14. Man, Ive used the crap out of the one I have. I used it with GREAT results when hammering on dolly on a but welded seem to smooth it out. The rubber on the dolly gives just enough for the weld on the backside without raising it to the top like a solid dolly does. Not sure if thats how im supposed to use it but works for me!!!!
     
  15. pimpin paint
    Joined: May 31, 2005
    Posts: 4,937

    pimpin paint
    Member
    from so cal

    Hey Scoot,

    I had one in the shape of a toe dolly that was good/o.k. for doing door skins, but not much better than soft pine or 200 m.p.h. tape wrapped around a dolly, used to save a painted surface.

    Unless you're planning on doing paintless dent repair or metalfinishing a panel without the use of any filler I'd save your money.:D

    Today, there are many tools for sale that have little use except lightening your walet, and taking up space in your tool box:rolleyes:

    " Meanwhyle, back aboard The Tainted Pork "
     
  16. Bugguts
    Joined: Aug 13, 2011
    Posts: 710

    Bugguts
    Member

    I have been doing body work for 30 years and have had a rubber dolly for 25 of those. Mine is 100% rubber and pretty worthless. It looks nice in my toolbox though. Because of no weight, it bounces too easily when bumping. I bought it to do door skin flanges, but quickly realized it was useless for that. Save your money.
     
  17. jhnarial
    Joined: Mar 18, 2007
    Posts: 410

    jhnarial
    Member
    from MISSOURI

    The only time that I found it handy was when I worked out a dent on finished painted car.
     
  18. beater32
    Joined: Mar 23, 2008
    Posts: 347

    beater32
    Member


    X2 on the lead dolly.
     
  19. SmoKerch
    Joined: May 23, 2011
    Posts: 123

    SmoKerch
    Member

  20. HOTRODKID91
    Joined: Feb 1, 2010
    Posts: 271

    HOTRODKID91
    Member

    I use a rubber dolly for doors skins at work and it works really good for me sense I never have to use body filler on a new door skin but I guess it depends who you are!
     
  21. Da Tinman
    Joined: Dec 29, 2005
    Posts: 4,226

    Da Tinman
    Member

    I use a cutoff deadblow hammer head. Heavy, little rebound and easy to hang onto.

    I use it more than a normal metal dolly.

    pics here,,,,

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=654139

    Not saying it right or wrong, not sure there is such a thing when it comes to metal forming/shaping. Everyone has thier own tricks and tribulations.
     
  22. TJratz
    Joined: Oct 28, 2008
    Posts: 373

    TJratz
    Member

    I use one when installing door skins..
     
  23. the metalsurgeon
    Joined: Apr 19, 2009
    Posts: 1,238

    the metalsurgeon
    Member
    from Denver

    Great for metal finishing.Can move the metal around a lot more than with a steel hand weight.

    my weekly metal work blog www.themetalsurgeon.com.com
     
  24. salf100
    Joined: Oct 13, 2009
    Posts: 431

    salf100
    Member

    wouldnt lead just get banged up when hammered on??
     
  25. hemi guy 53
    Joined: Dec 30, 2007
    Posts: 266

    hemi guy 53
    Member
    from colorado

    great for door skins
     
  26. Ravenwood
    Joined: Feb 26, 2009
    Posts: 237

    Ravenwood
    Member
    from Texas

    Da Tinman, excellent advice on utilizing the cutoff deadblow hammer head. And your work on the 'rose' demonstrates its functionality. As Elvis said, "Thank you very much." I'll lop off a deadblow hammer head tomorrow, before I forget.
     
  27. I bought a rubber covered dolly cause it was in the clearance bin for $5.
    I also use a hand sized shot bag as a soft backing .
     
  28. scootermcrad
    Joined: Sep 20, 2005
    Posts: 12,374

    scootermcrad
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thanks a ton for your input, everyone! It's really appreciated! Amazing how 50/50 the replies were.

    Maybe I'll try cutting up this big ol' round piece of hard urethane to a couple different shapes and just try it. It's here, it's free, and I have no other useful plans for it as of now. It's REAL close to what the hardness of lead would be... but it doesn't have the weight of the lead, which I could definitely see being helpful.

    [​IMG]
     
  29. Boeing Bomber
    Joined: Aug 5, 2010
    Posts: 1,079

    Boeing Bomber
    Member

    I use the red neoprene dolly from Martin for hammer on dolly with great success, especially for door skins. It doesn't bounce away from the metal so bad, and works good for shrinking metal too.
    When I got it at the Puyallup swap meet, I forgot it on the rear step bumper of my buddies van. Back home in Seattle. (40 miles) I got out and found it still sitting there. The neoprene, and golf ball dimples on it kept it from falling off. I cringe at the thought of that thing bouncing down the highway...
     
  30. I've taken large rubber head mallets and formed the head to the configuration I needed and it seamed to work great, but not in all cases!
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.