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Maybe crazy, but constructing fuse panel...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by willbilly53, Apr 18, 2013.

  1. willbilly53
    Joined: Mar 23, 2013
    Posts: 16

    willbilly53
    Member
    from Athens, GA

    Has anyone ever constructed their own fuse panel? The one for my '53 Buick Super seems fine, but I wouldn't mind "starting fresh" and it seems fairly simple enough, generally speaking - if I could find the individual parts. What say ye?
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2013
  2. i've made many of them , not hard to do
     
  3. Zombie Hot Rod
    Joined: Oct 22, 2006
    Posts: 2,453

    Zombie Hot Rod
    Member
    from New York

    I'd say it's probably cheaper and easier to just buy one that's already made. . . but if you're bored and have some spare time go for it.
     
  4. I've made a few,pirated a few from wrecked cars and bought a few kits.HRP
     

  5. bgaro
    Joined: Sep 3, 2010
    Posts: 1,189

    bgaro
    Member

    are we talking about glass or plastic push in?
     
  6. willbilly53
    Joined: Mar 23, 2013
    Posts: 16

    willbilly53
    Member
    from Athens, GA

    I'd like to use the glass kind. Anybody got a source for parts?
     
  7. Tman
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 34,932

    Tman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

  8. jgar
    Joined: Apr 17, 2013
    Posts: 8

    jgar
    Member

    Attached a picture of a temporary panel I once built until I could get my Ron Francis harness in. Hope it might help. Got everything from local auto parts store. Recommend buying a good harness kit, best way to go.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. GeezersP15
    Joined: Dec 4, 2011
    Posts: 555

    GeezersP15
    Member
    from N.E. PA

    Radio Shack stocks 3AG type fuseholders (made by Littlefuse, so they're good quality, not Chinese garbage). Lowes has nice 30A rated barrier type terminal strips in their electrical department (Ideal mfg., I think). Newark Electronics, Allied Electronics are both good sources for most anything electrical/electronic. Most of what you'll need could also be found at your local electrical distributor, where the pro's get their supplies.

    Here's a pic of the panel I built for my 48 Plymouth.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 18, 2013
  10. 32 hudson
    Joined: Mar 5, 2005
    Posts: 764

    32 hudson
    Member

    Nice looking panel even if it was just temporary. Well done.
     
  11. Fenders
    Joined: Sep 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,922

    Fenders
    Member

    Think you'll need 12 fuses?
    If so, put in 20.
    Better to have too many than not enough.
     
  12. willbilly53
    Joined: Mar 23, 2013
    Posts: 16

    willbilly53
    Member
    from Athens, GA

    killer photo, jgar - helps tremendously. Thanks for the tips everybody, did not expect such quick and thorough response! Gonna give it a shot. I'll report back with hopefully a cool new panel and not a charred '53 Buick. :)
     
  13. I just go to pick ur part and get an 80's chrysler fuse panel, two 1/4 bolts holding it in and just cut all wires off, wala instant panel with all fuses, relays in place usually 15 bucks.............
     
  14. deeddude
    Joined: Aug 30, 2011
    Posts: 127

    deeddude
    Member

    Geezer that panel looks great as well. I'm built one for the 54 using the blade type fuses, I have plenty of them. The blocks/panels can be bought at auto zone or others for about $5.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. I love doing electrical work. I'm no expert, but I'm learning all the time. I rewired my old '50 Plymouth quite a few years ago, as well as my friend's '52 Chevy and his OT Ford Courier.

    I find it fascinating to make a little pile of electrical parts do functions I need them to do. I've found that you can find alot of good components out of modern wrecked cars at the junk yards. Stuff like relays and fuse panels are cheap, and the assorted brands used in the cars from the factory are way better than the junky Chinese ones you get at places like Auto Zone or O'Reilly's just to name a few.

    All that being said, GeezersP15, that panel in your car is very impressive. Nice work! E
     

    Attached Files:

  16. if you just need a simple fuse panel, try to find a mid-60's American Motors Rambler, these are all push-on terminals, all fuses labeled with amp size and circuit; ignition feed, accessory feed, battery feed, etc.
    Gettin a bit hard to find now tho...some Jeeps had the same panel but no markings.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. willbilly53
    Joined: Mar 23, 2013
    Posts: 16

    willbilly53
    Member
    from Athens, GA

    man, those are some awesome examples. I thought I'd post the original fuse panel just to let you guys know what I'm going to try to replicate.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Old Ray
    Joined: Jul 21, 2008
    Posts: 92

    Old Ray
    Member

    Ah, my favorite part of a build. Can't help myself, I have to post pixs.

    As one guy said you don’t have to do something just because you can, but it sure is fun! Probably better to keep it simpler.

    First pic is in the rear floor of sedan del project and second pic is my current project, Intrepid seats on Caravan seat base with drawer (not worth the work). :)

    [​IMG],[​IMG]
     
  19. willbilly53
    Joined: Mar 23, 2013
    Posts: 16

    willbilly53
    Member
    from Athens, GA

    just ordered some parts from Waytek. Project for next weekend!
     
  20. I say spend 30 bucks and buy a new one. They are not expensive the pieces will run you nearly as much as a manufactured one.
     
  21. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,199

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    I wouldn't use glass or ceramic (foreign style) fuses. The modern small fuses have silver contacts and some have a closed bottom so if it blows no fire gets out.



    Ago
     
  22. Devin
    Joined: Dec 28, 2004
    Posts: 2,351

    Devin
    Member
    from Napa, CA

    ImageUploadedByTJJ1367198844.201595.jpg

    I'm a little further along now but this is just a generic glass fuse block. You get the idea.


    Posted from the TJJ App for iPhone & iPad
     
  23. Model T1
    Joined: May 11, 2012
    Posts: 3,309

    Model T1
    Member

    I've done it both ways. It worked out fine but takes way to long. Just as cheap and much earlier to buy a kit.
     
  24. prewarpete
    Joined: Jul 19, 2011
    Posts: 45

    prewarpete
    Member

    I make my own
    [​IMG]


    Posted from the TJJ App for iPhone & iPad
     
  25. BillM
    Joined: May 26, 2007
    Posts: 247

    BillM
    Member Emeritus

    I did this one because I wanted relays and terminals that would connect directly to wires without separate crimp on terminals. After working in electronics I was familiar with constructing printed circuit boards and knew what I wanted in the way of terminals. Not practical for most but gives you an idea what is possible.
     

    Attached Files:

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