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Hot Rods Magnesium Wheels

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by stanlow69, Sep 28, 2020.

  1. You show me your gray powdered wheels and I will show you my white powdered wheels. I actually own mag wheels so it will be easy for me to show my cards.
    Purple k was in our high school shop for mag fires. Luckily we never needed it.
     
  2. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 16,292

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    :eek:
    I was told there would be no math today!
     
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  3. I'll never have to worry about genuine mag wheels because I can't afford 'em and am too lazy to keep 'em polished.... LOLOL...
     
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  4. chevy57dude
    Joined: Dec 10, 2007
    Posts: 6,988

    chevy57dude
    Member

    1602093682057-1931397782.jpg
    Trying to show corrosion starting. Probably two months since I polished them. They look to have a coating of frost on 'em. It's white.
     
  5. bowie
    Joined: Jul 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,902

    bowie
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I’ve always called it, the dreaded white furries: F5E40899-819C-4B4E-AB6F-2770D3CAD4BC.jpeg
     
  6. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 40,136

    loudbang
    Member


    AH when I was in the USMC Purple K was used always and only for magnesium fires on aircraft.
     
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  7. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,942

    noboD
    Member

    How does a discussion always get to to point of my dick being bigger then yours?
     
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  8. spendingtheirinheritance
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 96

    spendingtheirinheritance
    Member

    These cars of ours have always been death traps. Now after some of these posts I have to worry about throwing a cigarette away and igniting my Halibrands and perishing in a ball of white hot fire while being concerned about the tendency of magnesium wheels to be crack prone and dangerous. Aren't Covid and Murder hornets enough? Perhaps I should just shit-can this roadster and stay safe.

    IMG_0665.JPG
     
  9. When the flies get unzipped and the ruler comes out the hemi is always bigger.
     
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  10. bowie
    Joined: Jul 27, 2011
    Posts: 2,902

    bowie
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Spending : Got a light? I’m more concerned with blowing out a Bucron.
     
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  11. Stan Back
    Joined: Mar 9, 2007
    Posts: 1,543

    Stan Back
    Member
    from California

    My ex-dragster partner polished my brand new rear Halibrands for my roadster almost 60 years ago. I got them thru Scotty's Muffler Service for about $80 each. Jim used a 1/4-inch electric drill to grind away the "golden" factory color. He said they "light off" every few moments. {Was this the granular stuff the in the 1900s (or so) that photographers used for flash pictures?) The fronts came for $50 for the pair with chrome hubs and Firestone racing wheels. Any way, they looked good for 50 years with weekly polishing with Simichrome, the only thing I found that worked. They're still around on a 32 roadster in San Diego. I guess they were a little cheaper then.

    Riverside with 442.jpg

    San Diego Wheels.jpg
     
  12. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 16,292

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    That's a fact Brian.
    Earlier I alluded to having some experience with a magnesium fire, not car related but every bit as scary, actually, it could be considered the perfect storm.
    As a young machinist (industrial), I had never cut magnesium and on this particular day I was given a "rush" job to modify thirty large magnesium shaft couplers for a mill that had an emergency shutdown on one of its lines.
    I had been machining steel all morning so the chip bin on my lathe was half full of not only scrap steel plus aluminum from the day before but also cutting fluid, tapping oil, etc.
    An experienced machinist would have known to clean the chip bin before proceeding with a magnesium job, well this did not happen in this case.
    After removing a large amount of ribbon like (not good) magnesium material from about ten couplers the leadman interupted me to have a look (he had never cut mag either I later found out) and to check my progress.
    Starting back up with a dull cutting tool I allowed the entry cut to "dwell" slightly, this friction on the thin ribbon of stock was like setting a match to a fuse and it preceeded down into the full chip bin setting it all on fire.
    The bucket of grease sweep next to my lathe did absolutely nothing and to make matters EXTREMELY worse the scared guy on the next machine grabbed a bucket of water and threw it on the blaze and then things got real ugly, but luckily someone from the electronics department came and put it out with a Halon extinguisher.
    The machine shop, front office and engineering department upstairs were evacuated and when the smoke cleared all of the bare steel jigs and fixtures nearby had taken on a rust like appearance, guess who's ass was now on fire, yep, mine.
    I never was asked to machine magnesium again.

    Related aricle here:
    upload_2020-10-7_14-24-42.png
    More here plus video.

    http://www.chicagofirewire.com/fire...be-some-magnesium-reaction-to-the-water/#gref
     
  13. 31hotrodguy
    Joined: Oct 29, 2013
    Posts: 2,704

    31hotrodguy
    Member

  14. stanlow69
    Joined: Feb 21, 2010
    Posts: 6,322

    stanlow69
    Member

    Like I stated earlier in this thread.
     
  15. Holding a match to a mag wheel wont light it off. It takes a good amount of heat or a good fire already in progress. If the mag is powder like in a fire cracker or small chips it starts much easier. Always use a sharp tool when machining and change the often.
    Save all the chips for the camp fire. Same with copper.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2020
  16. markluco
    Joined: Apr 15, 2011
    Posts: 22

    markluco
    Member
    from NE Phoenix

    So how can I determine whether these are actually magnesium (short of lighting them on fire and throwing water on it)? I was told so, decades ago, but what is the real test? (the bathroom scale reads in pounds.) IMG_4274.JPG IMG_4278.JPG
     
  17. Those are definitely aluminum not magnesium. But you can put a little vinegar on the back side in a rough cast area. If it was magnesium it would start to produce little bubbles. Mickey Thompson did not make those wheels in magnesium. Are they 14" x 6" ?
     
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  18. markluco
    Joined: Apr 15, 2011
    Posts: 22

    markluco
    Member
    from NE Phoenix

    15" x 6 ", 5 x 5-1/2 bolt pattern. Fits old Ford trucks and . . . ?
     
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  19. Just weighed my NOS 14 " x 6" in my basement. My 15" are in the shop so I can't weigh them.
    20201008_091115.jpg 20201008_090840.jpg
    So i guess the .4 lb difference makes sense.
     
  20. As I've posted on the H.A.M.B. before ...

    We ran a set of MAGNESIUM American Racing Equipment 5-spokes on the coupe throughout the '60s & '70s (late 1963 through 1981 to be exact) ... 15"x4" Torq-Thrust "Le Mans" on the front ... and 15"x8½" Torq-Thrusts on the rear:

    The HEMI32 Coupe - 1963.jpg
    1963 (Le Mans up front)

    The HEMI32 Coupe - 1964.jpg
    1964 (rears mounted on Bruce's slicks)

    The HEMI32 Coupe - 1967.jpg
    Late 60's (mounted on Goodyear Blue Streaks)

    The HEMI32 Coupe - 1969.jpg
    July 1969 (headed to Andy's Picnic)

    The HEMI32 Coupe - 1973.jpg
    February 1973 (all polished up for the GNRS)

    The HEMI32 Coupe - 1975.jpg
    September 1975

    I still have all four wheels ... and "someday" they will find their way back on the coupe for that circa 1964 Hot Rod look!
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2020
  21. Joe Troilo
    Joined: Oct 3, 2007
    Posts: 300

    Joe Troilo
    Member

    Been running these for over two years. They were new when purchased many years ago. Had them power coated to eliminate polishing and Gibbs use. Even back then they were expensive but they scream Hot Rod.
    wheels at Jack's.jpg 69352124_2462556567144555_8230649986300248064_n.jpg
     
  22. I'm holding out for titanium wheels. :cool:
     
  23. big bird
    Joined: Feb 16, 2014
    Posts: 117

    big bird
    Member

    High school auto shop we tried to repair a crack in an aluminum bellhousing with a TIG welder. Only one problem, it wasn't aluminum. Teacher rolled the welding cart outside and called the Fire dept. They tried throwing sand on it, and eventually sat back and watched it burn.
     
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  24. Always be careful with mag shavings. The chips are razor sharp. Slivers are very easy to acquire.
     
  25. Can make your own version of Phillips Milk of Magnesia if your wheels go up in smoke!
     
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  26. Originally bought Appliance 5-spoke aluminum wheels for my Willys. About 10 yrs ago I found a pair of 'brand new' 60s vintage Inglewood Pos-A-Traction 10x15 recap slicks that had never been mounted on ebaY for ridiculously low cost. They had different cores with different whitewalls so I figured I couldn't use them on my Mysterion clone so I got a bug to get some Halibrands to mount them on my Willys. Ran them to a couple California Hot Rod Reunions and March Meets before getting tired of polishing them and sold the mags and put the slicks on the Mysterion with Portawall whitewalls. The Halibrand frontrunners are aluminum repros.

    mag3.jpg
    1-p12007 WR w- Halibrands.jpg

    P1010455.JPG
     
  27. The more bolt patterns drilled into a wheel the cheaper they become. Two or three extra patterns really effect the price.
     
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  28. bchctybob
    Joined: Sep 18, 2011
    Posts: 3,759

    bchctybob
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    A few years back I repaired a pair of magnesium American Torque Thrusts that some bozo had drilled and attached huge lead weights to inside and out, probably 10 holes in each wheel. No one would touch them so I did the repairs myself after researching how to weld mag. After welding, I carefully used the good old Swedish hand mill (file) to make the welds flush for subsequent polishing. I didn't want a sander throwing magnesium all over my shop. Knowing the danger of magnesium filings, I collected all the debris from my work area. A few days later, my stepson and I took the filings out to a safe area and tried to light them, they wouldn't light. We had to dump them on an already burning fire to get the reaction we expected. I was surprised how difficult it was to ignite. I am in no way debunking the safety precautions stated previously, I'm just saying that I was surprised at our experience. Obviously magnesium is a material to be used and handled carefully and with respect but I certainly don't think it's dangerous to use as a material to make wheels.
    Here they are on the rear of my Austin..... Magnesium all around.
    RJshots (1).JPG
     
  29. Deuces
    Joined: Nov 3, 2009
    Posts: 22,130

    Deuces
    Member
    from Michigan

    Yeah, I know..... :(:rolleyes:
     
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  30. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,920

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Neither. 270 or 302. From the GMC trucks.
     
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