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Machinery

Discussion in 'The Antiquated' started by Hulkjoegan, Jun 2, 2018.

  1. Hulkjoegan
    Joined: May 16, 2018
    Posts: 5

    Hulkjoegan

    i work maintenance in a large machining facility. We have a lot of CNC lathes, but we also have a good amount of vintage automatics that still get used on a daily basis. Acme-Gridleys, New Britain, Goss, Warner Swasey, all from the 40s and 50s. 1EEAC797-D5B7-40E3-AD78-ACEE3827A688.jpeg ECB3CFF9-EABE-4837-9D94-C8420D7F4D6B.jpeg 80D6FA7A-0EAD-4113-BFC5-19DBED96E07E.jpeg 623F1E67-0334-4251-8342-7A973CC349E4.jpeg C5BC38C7-118F-4751-BF08-95B54E23C577.jpeg EA1AF046-E51B-4736-BDA4-93FE6691E833.jpeg 4E97B16F-A4BA-4A59-8EE2-9754B358C891.jpeg
     
  2. Rolleiflex
    Joined: Oct 25, 2007
    Posts: 883

    Rolleiflex
    Member

    Nice! When I went to school to become a machinist all of the equipment had been used to build B-29s (Boeing) and Sherman (PACCAR) tanks during WWII. I always loved how smooth and quiet that stuff ran.
     
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  3. Hulkjoegan
    Joined: May 16, 2018
    Posts: 5

    Hulkjoegan

  4. Hulkjoegan
    Joined: May 16, 2018
    Posts: 5

    Hulkjoegan

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  5. TagMan
    Joined: Dec 12, 2002
    Posts: 5,868

    TagMan
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I don't really collect old machine tools, but I have a 1947 13"x60" South Bend lathe in my shop and a '40's Sears band saw.
    The pictures below are of a circa 1905-1915 Brainard horizontal mill I had for several years before I donated it to a local transportation museum. Note the Model A transmission that was installed on it, probably in the '30's or '40's and used as a speed changer.
    =[​IMG]mill2 by TagMan, on Flickr
    [​IMG]mill1 by TagMan, on Flickr
     
  6. Hulkjoegan
    Joined: May 16, 2018
    Posts: 5

    Hulkjoegan

    This particular Acme was purchased new by my employer in 1932. This machine has been a workhorse for damn near 86 years. And realistically if we needed it to run for another 86, it could probably do it. I’m still trying to find out what this company did for the war effort. 494DFBC3-2895-4087-AD57-48CE9DB531A6.jpeg 3BAC1E08-9019-4354-84FE-A96AFDBA355B.jpeg
     
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  7. spurgeonforge
    Joined: Oct 18, 2013
    Posts: 415

    spurgeonforge
    Member

    9EAD4970-924F-49A7-88F7-0B654A746B8B.jpeg 7CECF85C-D4F9-4CAE-880C-C88419551826.jpeg Where I like to play, my Little Giant power hammer and forge.
     
  8. 41 GMC K-18
    Joined: Jun 27, 2019
    Posts: 388

    41 GMC K-18
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I had this zip tied to the grille of my 65 checker marathon for years, it generated a lot of questions.

    die sinker.JPG new line up 002.jpg
     
  9. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,710

    Boneyard51
    Member

    That’s is like the very first machine I ever ran. Looking for work in about 1975 I walked into a place that had help wanted sign hanging out. Machine shop! Talked to the foreman, told him I never ran a lathe before but could read mics and understood measurements in thousands. He hired me on the spot and showed me how to run that Warner and Swasey 5 A. In about twenty minutes I was making parts! I was a machinist! After a mont or two I realized I was just “ power and an observer”, not a machinist, per sae. About that time the company was trying to get more females hired on, with not so good results. Our reworker was getting covered up with bad parts. Boss came by and asked it I wanted the job of reworker on our shift! I jumped at the chance! Had to use my brain a little there. Loved that job on the 15 inch Clausing/ Colchester engine lathe. Only left because bit was too far from home, 50 miles, and had a opportunity to join the fire dept in my town.
    So, I still have my love of machining . I have three lathes, 19 inch LeBlond, 12 inch Clausing and a little Craftsman. Three mills, radial arm drill( big), one horizontal mill.two presses, belt sander, grinders.





    Bones
     
  10. TraditionalToolworks
    Joined: Jan 6, 2019
    Posts: 140

    TraditionalToolworks
    Member
    from NorCal

    I have to admit, I have a weak spot for old machines...just dragged this beast home this past Sat. drove 400 miles round trip in my flatbed to get it. In the last pic my friend is standing on the massive motor, the saw is over 8' high.

    Moak 36" High Speed Band Saw, 7-1/2hp direct drive motor. Built in the 50s I believe.

    moak-01.jpg moak-02.jpg moak-36-lower-wheel.jpg moak-36-motor-tag.jpg moak-36-with-randy.jpg

    I have too many machines to post here, you can see most of them at my VintageMachinery page:

    http://vintagemachinery.org/members/detail.aspx?id=3052
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2019
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  11. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 2,710

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Awesome score!






    Bones
     
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  12. 1953naegle
    Joined: Nov 18, 2013
    Posts: 201

    1953naegle
    Member

    I LOVE machine tools. Our family business is making leatherworking machinery and the oldest side of it goes back to 1858. So while we are keeping current with modern CNC stuff, I'm also a big promoter of the keeping the old manual stuff.

    Our oldest machines include a Cincinatti Tool and Cutter Grinder that we have reason to beleive was bought new by the company around 1900, A Brown and Sharpe production horizontal mill that was made between 1894 and 1900's (not sure exactly) and did something for The American Ordinace Co. around WW1 before we got it, an old Napier horizontal band saw, and a 16x8 Hendey 8 speed engine lathe built in 1909. All of which were originally powered by overhead pulley shafts with the exception of the Hendey which was cutting edge high tech with a built in electric motor. It's crazy to think this stuff was making parts before BOTH world wars and even before the Titanic!

    Some other fun ones include a 1938 South Bend Heavy 10 lathe, 1941 Bridgeport mill, 1936 Cincinatti 2L horizontal mill, 1946 Kearney Trecker 2H horizontal mill, 1954 Moore #2 Jig Borer, and a big 1930's Fosdick drill press.

    The Cincinatti grinder and Hendey lathe are offline right now as I've been rebuilding them in my "other" free time. IMO, Like old cars, these old tools reach a point that they have earned some respect and deserve a little extra effort to keep them around.

    I also have a softspot for wartime iron as I see it as a lasting legacy of the engineers and factory workers on the homefront who worked so hard to keep our servicemen supplied.
     
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  13. 1953naegle
    Joined: Nov 18, 2013
    Posts: 201

    1953naegle
    Member

    1569127640682-1241705787.jpg
    The 41' Bridgeport and the 1900 Cincinatti Grinder have taken up residence in my garage at home. Made some chips on the Bridgeport earlier today.
    15691278411382019959384.jpg
    The Cincinatti grinder is getting an extensive rebuild which is including rescraping the slide ways (another skill I've picked up). I'm also building a line-shaft "cube" around it so it could be moved around when needed, but still retain it's original drive.
     
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  14. john worden
    Joined: Nov 14, 2007
    Posts: 1,446

    john worden
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from iowa

    I just posted FOR SALE a vintage BLISS 21 ton press on the ANTIQUATED FOR SALE thread.
    Thanks. John
     
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  15. TraditionalToolworks
    Joined: Jan 6, 2019
    Posts: 140

    TraditionalToolworks
    Member
    from NorCal

    John,

    Wish I was closer to you, for $100 that would be in my shop.

    Cool old machine!
     
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  16. 41 GMC K-18
    Joined: Jun 27, 2019
    Posts: 388

    41 GMC K-18
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

  17. TraditionalToolworks
    Joined: Jan 6, 2019
    Posts: 140

    TraditionalToolworks
    Member
    from NorCal

    Nice 'ol gal you've got there, that's an oldie but a goodie!
     
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  18. 42merc
    Joined: Dec 19, 2010
    Posts: 598

    42merc
    Member

    I have these in my CNC department.
    16" Lodge & Shipley 1928 vintage.
    10" Star made by Seneca Falls Co. in NY, early 1900's P1030013.JPG P1030014.JPG
     
  19. vetteguy402
    Joined: Oct 27, 2009
    Posts: 142

    vetteguy402
    Member
    from omaha, ne

    I'm loving seeing the machines here. They don't make beauty like this anymore.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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