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Hot Rods M/T font...what is it?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Crown'd, Sep 24, 2017.

  1. Crown'd
    Joined: Jan 19, 2014
    Posts: 120

    Crown'd
    Member
    from Utah

    Does anyone know what font was used in the lettering of Mickey Thompson's parts? 2017-09-24 16.40.21.jpg
     
  2. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 45,244

    squirrel
    Member

    font? ....I think it was art, it wasn't a font
     
  3. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 13,206

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    You can bet ol Mickey had a hand in the design of that too!
     
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  4. tubman
    Joined: May 16, 2007
    Posts: 4,863

    tubman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    "squirrel" is probably right, but I was involved with a number of printing companies over the years and I know there are a TON of different fonts out there. There must be a font catalog (or something similar) on the internet you could look at.
     
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  5. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 45,244

    squirrel
    Member

    I think we should be discussing the typeface, not the font, eh?
     
  6. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,257

    jnaki

    Hey C,
    Tman is correct...I just went through all of my 285 fonts on my computer. That was a fun search, too. Close, but not the exact one. There must be fonts from the early 1960's that are not on one's computers today. Some of the fonts could have been redesigned as the years have rolled onward. If you find one that is close, make a jpeg out of it and stretch it sideways.

    Jnaki
    The early computers had early "standard" fonts, but the newer years brought on the designs to be fancy for communications. I am on my 4th gen computer with new fonts plus some of the old ones. The older ones, like the ones we are currently using on the HAMB. commercial accounts had access to many more that we "ordinary" people did not have...Try a silk screen company for fonts...a treasure trove.
     
  7. 0NE BAD 51 MERC
    Joined: Nov 12, 2010
    Posts: 1,146

    0NE BAD 51 MERC
    Member

    Not sure of the casting and machining process used in the 60s on Mickey s parts . But I am sure it had nothing to do with a computer or font selection back then! lol Larry
     
  8. Do a Google search MILLIONS of fonts out there, including car related like chrysler, Ford etc.
    You might not find it, many you have to pay for, and it will take a LOT of searching
    But there are TONS out there!
     
  9. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 45,244

    squirrel
    Member

  10. Crown'd
    Joined: Jan 19, 2014
    Posts: 120

    Crown'd
    Member
    from Utah

    Yes...there's millions, and as such almost nobody does their own. The super unique, capitalized "PORSCHE" logo on the side of 60''s race cars came from a font. When I chose a font for my business I made sure it existed in the 60's...because ithe was going to be used on my gasser in the future. So I'm betting Mickey selected the font/typeface...but didn't invent it.
     
  11. Crown'd
    Joined: Jan 19, 2014
    Posts: 120

    Crown'd
    Member
    from Utah

    Correct...many different types used. Nontheless all are a font/typeface.
     
  12. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 45,244

    squirrel
    Member

    My guess is that the M/T logos were probably all drawn by hand, not selected from a typeface catalog.

    Like I said before, it's art. And if the only two letters available are the upper case M and T, then it's not really a typeface.
     
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  13. Crown'd
    Joined: Jan 19, 2014
    Posts: 120

    Crown'd
    Member
    from Utah

    While that's a possibility the other is they match one of the many out there. And I don't need to get it exact, just as most of the GT350 logos on rocker panel replacements aren't exactly right there's "close enough"...just wanna engrAve the valve cover and a font similar would be cool.
     
  14. EnglishJon
    Joined: Oct 27, 2009
    Posts: 39

    EnglishJon
    Member

    The closest I could find is City Light (Light describes the weight of the type; light, medium or bold etc) published by Berthold in the 1930s. But the Mickey Thompson version is "extended", drawn out horizontally.
    Unknown.jpg
    City Medium may also work too. Hopefully his will be a starting point for you.
     
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  15. Hey Jim.....look a this....M/T..pretty close, eh?
     
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  16. henryj1951
    Joined: Sep 23, 2012
    Posts: 2,310

    henryj1951
    Member
    from USA

    Same thing applies for the HenryJ (NO Faunt) or type face its one of those One Off things...
     
  17. The Shift Wizard
    Joined: Jan 10, 2017
    Posts: 1,881

    The Shift Wizard
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I worked 40 years in the graphic arts, as a lithographer, art director, production manager and eventually a business owner. (60's through 90's) When it came to trademarks and logos, most companies I know of, had them uniquely designed to be unlike any off-the-shelf font. A business can't own a trademark if it's a font that somebody else owns, whether available for free or for a fee. If a company wanted printed material with their trademark, the company had to supply the printer with clip art to use. That's not to say a font designer couldn't be hired to create a trademark that consists of a couple of letters. But a business wouldn't need an entire alphabet plus numbers and dingbats, just the trademark. The company pays for the design service and then owns the design and controls its use.

    I can't say what Micky Thomson did, but it would be unusual to take a readily available font that anyone could use, and couldn't be trademarked, to be his logo. It's not unheard of for an owner of a small company to self design a trademark or logo using inspiration from a lot of things, including various fonts. It does seem that the M, backslash, T has been used by no other company. It also seems other fonts different from the valve cover have been used in Mickey Thomson literature, but not exactly as trademarks those cases. Odds are the trademark as on the valve cover is uniquely designed. I could be wrong but I'm betting on that.
     
  18. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 17,575

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California

    I'd call it the Mickey Thompson font. it wouldn't take much effort to DRAW a complete alphabet in the style of the logo.
     
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  19. Crown'd
    Joined: Jan 19, 2014
    Posts: 120

    Crown'd
    Member
    from Utah

    That's exactly what I was looking for, thank you. The actual M/T is too wide for my purpose, but I assumed if it existed at all there was likely a thinner variant available. One day sooner than later I'll start a thread showing the reasons for the questions I pose on occasion.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2017
  20. I doubt he would have searched all fonts etc to make sure it was unique, I bet he came up with it from something he liked and worked it a bit to make it his. JW
     
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  21. quick85
    Joined: Feb 23, 2014
    Posts: 1,932

    quick85
    Member

    "I think, I'd say, I doubt, I assumed, I bet, I could be wrong, I'd call, My guess".

    Get the answer you're looking for?
     
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  22. Go here: http://www.myfonts.com/
    Type "wide slab serif" in the search field.
    Spend an eternity searching for the closest match you can find. :)
     
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  23. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 45,244

    squirrel
    Member

    Find the guy who did it, and ask him.
     
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  24. M/T
    Courier New (bold).
    Yeah- I'm a PowerPoint mercenary.:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2017
  25. Some of us are old enough to remember the days before computers. Some aren't.
    Almost all of that stuff was done by hand, drawn by hand and then pattern makers made the patterns for casting by hand.

    Even typeface was first drawn by hand before being mass produced. Sign painters had different font patterns to follow and they did it all by hand. Some threw artistic license into it or perhaps used a stencil but laser Cut vinyl letters didn't come around yet. Then again the first master set of stencils were done by hand.

    And Typing was actually done by smacking a formed letter against an ink ribbon. The "word processor" wasn't around. Typing was Just a bit more refined than chiseling a rock.
     
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  26. All done by hand first, then transferred to printing plate. An artist actually could make a living.
    image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg
     
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  27. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 15,796

    tfeverfred
    Member

  28. henryj1951
    Joined: Sep 23, 2012
    Posts: 2,310

    henryj1951
    Member
    from USA

    The 60's had art -n- type mixed into artistic font ---> here's two samples--->
    . art faunt.jpg flame faunt.jpg
     
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  29. Donuts & Peelouts
    Joined: Dec 12, 2016
    Posts: 1,191

    Donuts & Peelouts
    Member
    from , CA

  30. denis4x4
    Joined: Apr 23, 2005
    Posts: 3,424

    denis4x4
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Colorado

    A lot of art directors would use a particular font as a starting point and them modify it so it was unique. The CROWER logo appears to be an off the shelf stencil font, but there were some subtle modifications to make it one of a kind. There were no such things as page maker back in the sixties....the closest thing to a font catalog was a proof sheet from a printer that was still using a Linotype machine.
     
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