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History low & rare production numbers - all makes would be interesting

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by HOTRODPRIMER, Apr 11, 2021.

  1. I recently read where the 1932 Ford roadster pickup held the title of the lowest production model built that year, I have always been under the impression that the 1932 sedan delivery was.

    Is this correct? HRP

    [​IMG]
     
  2. rusty rocket
    Joined: Oct 30, 2011
    Posts: 4,165

    rusty rocket
    Member

    In my 1932 ford book volume 2 it says 58 sedan delivery’s were produced world wide.
    The roadster pickup which was officially called an open cab pickup is unclear in this book, it says it ran on a 106” commercial chassis but I do not see production numbers for pickups.
    So I guess that didn’t help you one bit. Haha!
     
  3. Fordors
    Joined: Sep 22, 2016
    Posts: 3,452

    Fordors
    Member

    The 58 SD’s were Model B’s, there were also 348 V8’s built. As @rusty rocket said production numbers of open cab trucks were not broken down by model, there were pickups, dump trucks, chassis’s shipped with open cabs to be fitted as fire trucks, etc.
    I think the B66 Deluxe Pickup will be the lowest amount built with 68 produced. As soon as I dig up a photo I’ll post it.
     
  4. Fordors
    Joined: Sep 22, 2016
    Posts: 3,452

    Fordors
    Member

    9F368F18-886A-42EE-AEFB-904CC5B2DDB8.jpeg

    Not the Deuce, still looking for that photo. This is a ‘31 Deluxe Pickup, Ford ordered just under 400 bodies from Briggs, production halted at 293 with lagging sales. The 68 built in 1932 must have been assembled to use up the bodies.
    The photo I’m looking for shows three female lifeguards with a white ‘32 B66 parked on the Pacific Coast Highway.
     

  5. The thread is open to any and all makes & models , low production automobiles & trucks are interesting regardless who built them. HRP
     
  6. hotrodjack33
    Joined: Aug 19, 2019
    Posts: 2,205

    hotrodjack33
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    This may not count because it is an "Australia only" 1932 Ford, but it may be the lowest "factory production" with less than 30 (28 I think) zute.JPG
     
  7. '65 Falcons had some very limited production body styles. Ford discontinued the Sprint early in the year so as not to compete with the new Mustang. Only 2800 hardtops were built, and a mere 300 convertibles. They don't even show up in the service manuals. Last year for the sedan delivery too; only about 480 of those were built.
     
    Deuces, irishsteve, 3W JOHN and 2 others like this.
  8. 1952henry
    Joined: Jan 8, 2006
    Posts: 822

    1952henry
    Member

    I have a 1952 Ford F3 4wd. It is a model R32 in Marmon Herrington speak. M-H converted Fords to all wheel drive as a factory authorized accessory. One of the fellow M-H enthusiasts has determined 2-300 3/4 tons were converted each year in this era. Not many survived due to the brutal treatment they endured.

    Years ago I had a WW2 IHC USMC frontline ambulance. Factory parts book put the number at 800.
     
  9. About 45 years ago I had a '53 Pontiac Sedan Delivery and IIRC there were only about 650 of those built, so I'm sure not many exist today.
     
    Deuces, 3W JOHN and HOTRODPRIMER like this.
  10. AVater
    Joined: Dec 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,487

    AVater
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    1. Connecticut HAMB'ers

    I would think 1942 anything would have low numbers. Throw in an uncommon body style like sedan delivery or convertible and that could be a winner.
     
  11. winduptoy
    Joined: Feb 19, 2013
    Posts: 2,373

    winduptoy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    My 1919, 735 Stanley is serial number 19114. Nineteen is the designation for the year and it was the 114th one produced out of 488 total for the year, across all models. They cost 10 times + what a Model T did and there is a reason we aren't all driving steam powered vehicles today...
     
  12. kabinenroller
    Joined: Jan 26, 2012
    Posts: 622

    kabinenroller
    Member

    OK you asked for it. My 1957 Messerschmitt KR201 is one of about 32 examples imported to the United States and Canada, and one of approximately 450 built world wide. I have owned it for about 12 years, it has under 2,800 original miles.
    6699E5FD-B980-4AB3-92F9-0F2984BBBE64.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2021
  13. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 14,740

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    I can't post a photo of the car due to being two years past HAMB guidelines but a certain year ChevyII/Nova was made available with the very popular L79 small block engine option and the consensus within that community is that GM only built six or seven and only three are known to exist, that's damn rare in my book!
     
  14. 3W JOHN
    Joined: Oct 8, 2015
    Posts: 914

    3W JOHN
    Member

    Are the A 400's not kind of rare?
     
  15. Lil32
    Joined: Apr 4, 2012
    Posts: 1,846

    Lil32
    Member

    only one in World
    1932 Chev Moonlight Speedster
    DSCN2217.JPG
     
  16. enjenjo
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 2,533

    enjenjo
    Member
    from swanton oh

    I call bull on this. I owned an L79 Nova I bought new, and my brother owned another one. I also knew of at least 10 more in my local area. Now if you are talking about L79 Nova wagons I would believe that.

    I also owned a one of 50 1953 Studelac built by Bill Frick. 53 Caddy engine, Jaguar transmission with with a Laycock overdrive, and Lincoln brakes all around.
     
  17. bowlingball
    Joined: Oct 24, 2008
    Posts: 130

    bowlingball
    Member
    from Australia

    There was a restored Stanley steamer in my area when I was growing up, I was the only kid in the early 80s who knew what it was , I remember it chugging up picnic point rd, with the owner walking next to it, he told us young punks in our FX FJ Holden’s if he wound it out it would eat our hotted up Holden’s at top speed,,, everyone laughed at the old crazy restorer except me.....
     
  18. bowlingball
    Joined: Oct 24, 2008
    Posts: 130

    bowlingball
    Member
    from Australia

    IMG_2360.JPG Aussie 34 roadster less than 1000 made and not many V8s ( I’ve been told less than a third were 8s) internet photo
     
  19. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 14,740

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    I don't make this stuff up!
    You apparently had one of 5,481 units built in the "well known" model year.
     
  20. 61SuperMonza
    Joined: Nov 16, 2020
    Posts: 490

    61SuperMonza
    Member

    One f the cars on my bucket list would be a Yenko stinger Stage III.
    This is a truly special hot rod.
    If you have the opportunity to drive one you will be left with nothing but a shit eating grin on your face.
    230 HP in a car that weighs 2100 LBS make for a spirited ride.
    There were only 100 YS cars totaling 65.
    I'm not sure of the exact number on Stage III cars but it was less than 30 cars. The numbers aren't fact but I know the number is low.
    VERY SPECIAL HOT RODS
     
  21. Terry Buffum
    Joined: Mar 20, 2008
    Posts: 287

    Terry Buffum
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Oregon

    I hope I've done this Photobucket thing correctly so the image shows. 1951 Ferrari 340 American, Touring body. One of five built (4.1 liter V-12, dry sump, five speed). Quite a few more with similar body but smaller engines. Competitive on the track and received the Hans Tanner trophy at Pebble Beach in 1980.

    https://app.photobucket.com/u/terrybuffum/p/3e9844a7-846f-4f9e-b120-75d9

    Since that did not work, here is another attempt
    https://app.photobucket.com/u/terrybuffum/p/3e9844a7-846f-4f9e-b120-75d9449b8d0e
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2021
  22. Ned Ludd
    Joined: May 15, 2009
    Posts: 4,220

    Ned Ludd
    Member

    Beyond a certain point the very idea of "stock" collapses. Upmarket cars pre-WWII were often sold only as bare chassis, and though coachbuilders had standard designs often adapted to various different chassis, to some extent each and every car was more or less bespoke. Bugatti, Mercedes-Benz, and Packard were unusual in that they offered factory coachwork at all — in Bugatti's case only because of the design talent of Ettore Bugatti's son, Jean.

    People struggle with the concept today. They have trouble grasping that, say, Rolls-Royce had very little style authorship in 1930, certainly not to any extent as to allow the use of visual design deliberately to cultivate a corporate image. Among those able to afford such cars today, however, it is remarkable how easily liberties are taken during restorations, liberties which would be sacrilege to the numbers-matching '60s musclecar set. At those rarefied altitudes originality becomes nebulous and provenance is more important: each car's unique, ongoing story. It's a completely different mindset.
     
  23. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 8,718

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    My 35 Chevy phaeton is one of only 647 produced by GM Holden's (Australia), GM (North America) produced approximately 210 with GM (Canada) producing even less (LHD & RHD). I've also seen RHD 34 & 35 Chevy (GM Canada) phaetons in South Africa and India.
    Here's a note on that 32 Moonlight speedster posted by @Lil32 that is local to us. Approx 100 roadsters were produced in aluminum, not steel.
    moonlightlge2.png
    upload_2021-4-12_21-3-17.png
     
    34 GAZ, chryslerfan55, Deuces and 6 others like this.
  24. AVater
    Joined: Dec 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,487

    AVater
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    1. Connecticut HAMB'ers

    8855167C-FFD8-44E6-A220-6206C265A59E.jpeg
    Not mine but seen at a cruise night a couple of summers back.
     
  25. 1952henry
    Joined: Jan 8, 2006
    Posts: 822

    1952henry
    Member

    The original Ford M-H Ranger is a 1 of 1 prototype. 1942 sedan delivery, sent to Shop of Seibert to have windows cut in, upholstery and seats added, with wood frame work to support tin, then to Indiana to have driven front axle and transfer case added. Had to be built with the 4 speed. Sorry, Willys did not have the first SUV.

    Starting in 1948, and ending in 1956, Ford revived the Ranger concept. Same details for the 1942 described above. No more than 50 were built from 48-56.

    Though considered coach work, one must consider the Darrin Packard. 16-17 built. My dad's cousin and her husband had one. It was a 1938 that got sent back to have a 40 front grill retrofitted when that new tin came out. They owned it since 1950. Part of the coach work involved a cast aluminum cowl 3/4" thick. If you rapped your knuckles on it, you knew it was substantial. That was a beautiful car. They drove it all over, even coming from the Puget Sound to ND years ago.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2021
  26. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 7,395

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    My Bantam is 1 of 532 pickups made, and the only one with Cragars. :)

    20210228_102305.jpg
     
  27. LOU WELLS
    Joined: Jan 24, 2010
    Posts: 2,043

    LOU WELLS
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from IDAHO

    2279753 (2).jpg 1940 Ford "Standard" Sedan Delivery With A Production Of 770...
     
    i.rant, fordflambe, alfin32 and 10 others like this.
  28. 1935 Willys 77 Panel Delivery. A well known photo of one that's not mine, but mine is not photo worthy yet. Reportedly 88 produced and I know of only 17 still around in various states of condition. willys2-1.jpg
    In 1936/1937 it's been said 370 were produced
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2021
  29. A lot of us own modified vehicles that we would now consider one of one.
    A little beyond that, I own a one of two. These were built at the same time for two guys that wanted identical rods. I now own one of them. I've never seen the twin other than this old photo of them together.
    1932 Ford Roadster (127).jpg
     
  30. This?

    [​IMG]
     

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