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"Low Budget" floor patch stamping

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by coffin creeper, May 4, 2013.

  1. coffin creeper
    Joined: Jun 22, 2005
    Posts: 110

    coffin creeper
    Member

    I always enjoy reading thru the tech week posts, there is always such a wide display of talent and ingenuity. This is the first time I had a solution that I thought worthy of, most likely not winning anything but at least sharing. This post is for those of you, who like me have limited space and power for tools and need to make a one off complex shaped patch with a somewhat disposable tool. One day I hope to have more room, but until that time you have to make do with what you do have. So this is what I came up with...

    Problem: 52 Studebaker truck passenger side inner step to cab floor
    threshold was rusted out in the most unfortunate of places.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Solution: Make a plywood die to stamp out a piece that can then be finished
    by hand. First I made a paper pattern of the desired shape. Then
    I trimmed the existing threshold of the rusted and whole filled
    metal, to leave only a solid edge which will be overlapped by the
    new piece. With the pattern I cut the plywood shapes and sanded
    the desired radius on opposite corners of the two pieces. I then
    attached each of them to a piece that was the size of them fitted
    together to make a top and bottom die. To press the dies together
    I drilled two holes to the outsides of the desired size finished piece
    for all-thread. I finished off with some steel flat stock to help
    stiffen the dies. (If I ever need to do this process again I would
    put all-thread at each corner with steel plates that covered the full
    size of the plywood.)

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    I then placed the dies in my bench vise and started tightening
    the three compression points until the dies bottomed out.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    With the starter piece stamped out I worked it with a slap
    hammer and various mandrels until it fit. It still needs a
    little grinding finish work, but I believe it was a success.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. Sweet. That technique can be applied for all kinds of stuff. Looking good man.
     
  3. Voodoowagon
    Joined: Apr 5, 2007
    Posts: 353

    Voodoowagon
    Member
    from Fort worth

    That's awesome, thank you for sharing
     

  4. 1964countrysedan
    Joined: Apr 14, 2011
    Posts: 1,131

    1964countrysedan
    Member
    from Texas

  5. Rob68
    Joined: Jun 16, 2011
    Posts: 495

    Rob68
    Member

    very cool!
     
  6. Bugguts
    Joined: Aug 13, 2011
    Posts: 697

    Bugguts
    Member

    Great idea. I'm gonna give it a try.
     
  7. JEM
    Joined: Feb 6, 2007
    Posts: 1,040

    JEM
    Member

    I'd been thinking about something like that for a while, but never gotten around to doing anything about it.

    My guess is you've switched a lot of light bulbs on in people's heads with this one.
     
  8. raymay
    Joined: Mar 2, 2008
    Posts: 2,403

    raymay
    Member

    Great and easy to apply technique. Thanks for sharing.
     
  9. young'n'poor
    Joined: Jan 26, 2006
    Posts: 1,280

    young'n'poor
    Member
    from Anoka. MN

    That turned out pretty damn good! That's a pretty good idea man...
     
  10. 5559
    Joined: Oct 25, 2012
    Posts: 362

    5559
    Member
    from tn

    I've used 2-2X4s to make the bend from floor to toe board , but never would have thought something as complicated as your patch panels could work---helping each other is what this site is about--GOOD JOB!!!!!
     
  11. Great low cost option. Guys seem to think they need to spend their life savings to build a car, this shows the best tool is the one between your ears.
     
  12. Moedog07
    Joined: Apr 11, 2011
    Posts: 188

    Moedog07
    Member

  13. 33sporttruck
    Joined: Jun 5, 2012
    Posts: 532

    33sporttruck
    Member

    Great Thread !!! Post more as you build. Good Old Common Sense still goes a long way when you need it most................... Jeff
     
  14. black 62
    Joined: Jul 12, 2012
    Posts: 1,895

    black 62
    Member
    from arkansas

    very resourceful...
     
  15. REBEL43
    Joined: Feb 17, 2007
    Posts: 698

    REBEL43
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from TENNESSEE

    Great job. Could work on a lot of hard to find panels
     
  16. low-n-slo54
    Joined: Jul 25, 2009
    Posts: 1,920

    low-n-slo54
    Member

    Low buck and cool!
     
  17. 1927Tudor
    Joined: Nov 21, 2007
    Posts: 188

    1927Tudor
    Member

    Extremely clever approach, well done. Did you need to compensate for the thickness of the sheet metal when building the dies?

    You may wish to trim and fit with existing sheet metal after forming the part to butt weld rather than lap joint to avoid trapping areas for future rust, depending if this is possible given the location of the patch.
     
  18. Motomike43
    Joined: Jan 13, 2013
    Posts: 156

    Motomike43
    Member

    looks good. not too many people realize that being a good wood worker is a important part of being a good metal worker. Making a good accurate Buck / jig / hammer form or wood press is all part of restoring cars.
    I would suggest using a few small screws to attach your metal down to your lower plate. This will prevent any slipping of the metal. Just use small enough screws that you can easily plug weld the holes later. I think your finished product will benefit.
     
  19. OLDTGUY
    Joined: Jan 16, 2013
    Posts: 88

    OLDTGUY
    Member

    Great thread, nice work, Thanks.
    JJ
     
  20. choptruck
    Joined: Jan 2, 2005
    Posts: 273

    choptruck
    Member

    I've said it before and I'll say it again, I'm honored and fortunate to have a friend and club brother that can think as well as have great design and fabrication skills. I'd like to say how surprised I am at this tech tip......but I'm not.
     
  21. pottsie454
    Joined: Feb 12, 2011
    Posts: 399

    pottsie454
    Member

    Excellent idea. Thanks for sharing. I didn't see it said, but in theory you could also use a hydraulic press and some plate steel. I know some don't have a press, but if you did....
     
  22. flatheadpete
    Joined: Oct 29, 2003
    Posts: 10,088

    flatheadpete
    Member
    from Burton, MI

    I worked at a shop where we routinely made metal dies similiar to this and used either a hydraulic press or even an arbor press. Great tech post. Really illustrates how to this nicely.
     
  23. R Frederick
    Joined: Mar 30, 2009
    Posts: 2,658

    R Frederick
    Member
    from illinois

    I would have taken it out in the driveway and ran over it with my pickup, lol. I'm not trying to be a smartass, it probably would work well.
     
  24. Doktor Hug
    Joined: Sep 20, 2009
    Posts: 54

    Doktor Hug
    Member

    wow. such cool stuff on this board. nicely done!
     
  25. haroldd1963
    Joined: Oct 15, 2007
    Posts: 1,154

    haroldd1963
    Member
    from Peru, IL

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