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Looking for that miracle "tip/short cut" for body filler at panel gaps!!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by SMOKINFLATHEAD, Apr 16, 2009.

  1. SMOKINFLATHEAD
    Joined: Apr 2, 2008
    Posts: 482

    SMOKINFLATHEAD
    Member
    from SOCAL

    I am in the process of working on the fitment and body work on the F1. The valance has been worked to the point that there are minor differences between it and the fenders, SO I will have to smooth filler over both sides of the two panels where they meet. This being said does anyone have a tip on how to minimize the work needed to restore the gap between the panels. I know I can just cut the gap while placing the filler but wondered if there was some trick I wasn't aware of. Thanx
     
  2. oilslinger53
    Joined: Apr 17, 2007
    Posts: 2,475

    oilslinger53
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from covina CA

    Cut, bend, weld/braze, grind,pound, repeat. got any pics of the gaps?
     
  3. SMOKINFLATHEAD
    Joined: Apr 2, 2008
    Posts: 482

    SMOKINFLATHEAD
    Member
    from SOCAL

    There not bad at all, just thought you might be able to place tin foil between the gap then mud over and the panels would be stuck together.? just a thought on doing a job easier and faster.;)
     
  4. Black Primer
    Joined: Oct 1, 2007
    Posts: 967

    Black Primer
    Member

    There is a right way and a wrong way. Tin-foil would be wrong. Any joint like that will crack when the body flexes.
     
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  5. brewsir
    Joined: Mar 4, 2001
    Posts: 3,279

    brewsir
    Member

    So you want to keep bondo out of the crack right? Maybe just spread the bondo and trim the crack with a single edge razor blade before it fully kicks.? Or maybe you can wrap a piece of fishing line into the crack before the bondo and use it to cut the line at the crack.
     
  6. Black Primer
    Joined: Oct 1, 2007
    Posts: 967

    Black Primer
    Member

    Sorry, I think I read your post wrong. Could you take the panels apart and build up the edges with weld, and grind for a better fit?
     
  7. oilslinger53
    Joined: Apr 17, 2007
    Posts: 2,475

    oilslinger53
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from covina CA

    I would personally braze some brass onto the edge and file or grind to prefection.If all ya got is bondo, then I would use wax paper.
     
  8. stagernwings
    Joined: Dec 9, 2007
    Posts: 187

    stagernwings
    Member
    from tx

    nothing sticks to brass .:eek:
     
  9. stagernwings
    Joined: Dec 9, 2007
    Posts: 187

    stagernwings
    Member
    from tx

    use flexible plastic in short areas plastic spreaders work great .in longer areas you can use a sheet of file paper and fill along the paper backing side .when almost hard remove and use the paper another day or turn it around and do the same again .body shops have been doing this for as long as plastic filler has been around .c
     
  10. maniac
    Joined: Jul 11, 2005
    Posts: 539

    maniac
    Member



    I used 3/16 brake line, easy to bend and cheap,tacked it every 1/2" or so, and then used the filler.
     
  11. One common way to fill both sides of two panels is to use sheet wax in the gap.

    It comes in different thicknesses and works great.

    Just put in in the gap, fill the area, and when the filler dries sand both panels togeather and dig the wax out when you get the area straight.

    I think this is what you were getting at.
     
  12. stagernwings
    Joined: Dec 9, 2007
    Posts: 187

    stagernwings
    Member
    from tx

    thats a popular way to do it but cracking starts quick between the tacks
    unfortunatly a solid weld usualy leaves a warp on thiner metals . most options have draw backs.c
     
  13. oilslinger53
    Joined: Apr 17, 2007
    Posts: 2,475

    oilslinger53
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from covina CA

    Really? I musta got lucky on my door corners then:D. Next time I'll use lead...
     
  14. SMOKINFLATHEAD
    Joined: Apr 2, 2008
    Posts: 482

    SMOKINFLATHEAD
    Member
    from SOCAL

    Yes, and Yes, The gaps are great. I have a welder and a file, The issue is horizontal accross the gap meaning one side is slightly higher than the other and such. The fishing line is a great idea (hense tip/short cut) I am not familiar with sheet wax, is this somewhat like wax paper?
     
  15. pimpin paint
    Joined: May 31, 2005
    Posts: 4,940

    pimpin paint
    Member
    from so cal

    Hey,

    In the time you'll fiddle fuck around with mud, tryin' to get a good looking gap/seam, that, over time will crack, you could just straighten the panel!
    The flange at the valance panel is a ninety, the flange at the fender is a ninety, also. Spend the time, now with a heel dolly and a hammer, cross pein, square headed bumping, or a pick hammer, and straighten the flange areas, as necessary. Even if you get the area, say 95% straightened, you'll be much better off, than with mud troweled over the seam.

    Swankey Devils C.C.
    " Spending A Nation Into Generational Debt Is Not An Act Of Compassion!"
     
  16. oilslinger53
    Joined: Apr 17, 2007
    Posts: 2,475

    oilslinger53
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from covina CA

    o.k, in that case I would use wax paper. I believe sheetwax is british for wax paper...
     
  17. SMOKINFLATHEAD
    Joined: Apr 2, 2008
    Posts: 482

    SMOKINFLATHEAD
    Member
    from SOCAL

    90 degree angles are tits! There are reinforcement sheet's to the interior of these flanges so I'm glad there aren't any real issues there. I'm talking about the flow accross the panels, I appriciate the advice, wax paper or fishing string will work just fine, Then I will just feather the edge to steal.
     
  18. Dumb question but aren't they bolted on? if so why not slot them a little so they can be moved up a bit and be tightened back up to make them match. if that won't work just mud over them and take the spreader and run it down the crack when it is wet and after it kicks fold over the paper and sand it smooth and put the radius in it.
     
  19. John_Kelly
    Joined: Feb 19, 2003
    Posts: 535

    John_Kelly
    Member

    "I'm talking about the flow accross the panels,"

    If you are talking about the flow between panels, I'm guessing that there is a slight hump on the metal surface near the gap? If so, you can shrink the hump down to get your flow back. You may also have to do minor stretching nearby to blend the contours and keep enough compound shape for panel rigidity. Do you have any pictures of what the problem area looks like?

    John www.ghiaspecialties.com
     
  20. SMOKINFLATHEAD
    Joined: Apr 2, 2008
    Posts: 482

    SMOKINFLATHEAD
    Member
    from SOCAL

    I'll try to get some pictures up after work tonight. The area is odd, as there is somewhat of a crown where the panels meet. So, a straight edge accross the gap will not show the problem exactly. I thought about pulling the low end up with my uni-spotter then filing, but I really don't think I need to go that far. I have egged the holes where it mounts to align the to panels best . Got the fit as close as possible, But keep in mind "work trucks from the 50's weren't meant to have the panels line up, like I want them to."
     

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