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Lookin for some examples of coupe headliner installation

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Crease, Dec 20, 2004.

  1. Crease
    Joined: May 7, 2002
    Posts: 2,872

    Crease
    Member

    I am on a mission to carry out the worlds slowest upholstery job. So far, I have the door and kick panels cut. Also finished up all the wood. Getting ready to do the rear quarter window panels. My question is, whats the best way to secure the head liner. I have several ideas in my head, but would like to get some input. My car is a 33' 5 window, but examples of anything from 28-40 or so would be of interest.

    Thanks folks!
     
  2. Crease
    Joined: May 7, 2002
    Posts: 2,872

    Crease
    Member

  3. Ryan
    Joined: Jan 2, 1995
    Posts: 18,471

    Ryan
    ADMINISTRATOR
    from Austin, TX
    Staff Member

    I'm interested in this too... anyone have any shots of early ford headliners?
     
  4. tootallrodder
    Joined: Jan 7, 2003
    Posts: 404

    tootallrodder
    Member Emeritus

    This year when I did the Headliner on my 36 Tudor, I used Hot melt glue to attach the headliner to the window frames on the body then the garnish molding/window frames cover it all. The glue works great and was used where the tack strips did not exist.

    Good luck with it.
     
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  5. Automotive Stud
    Joined: Sep 26, 2004
    Posts: 3,794

    Automotive Stud
    Member

    Just a thought. Maybe you could glue the headliner to a cardboard shell and install that somehow. The garnish mouldings can hold down the edges tight. I like to use contact cement to hold down corners, it can be loosened by hand if you need to pull up a corner later.
     
  6. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    The following pic is of a headliner we did in a '32 plymouth. It's a realtively simple process that we've done time and time again cars from Model T coupes to cars as new as a '48 Chevy sedan. Although this one is of a contemporary design... You could do one with a tuck and roll insert.

    I'm startin' one in a '41 Willys coupe on Tuesday and will finish it up by Wednesday. I can snap some pics of the process if it's of interest and do a "How-To". It does require a stitch around the outter edge by an industrial machine, Some good contact cement, a hand stapler, a piece of thin cardboard, some foam and an item called Plygrip (available from any furniture repair shop. With a few instructions, anyone can handle it.. Should I take some pics? Stitch
     

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  7. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    nother...in a '39 chevy sedan. It shows the stitch line a bit better.
     

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  8. Jason455
    Joined: Jun 21, 2004
    Posts: 515

    Jason455
    Member

    skipstitch, I would love to see pics. I do household furniture. I have no idea how you get car interiors to look like that. AWESOME!
     
  9. 50dodge4x4
    Joined: Aug 7, 2004
    Posts: 3,536

    50dodge4x4
    Member

    OH YES post that "How To" It would be great to see how it is actually suppose to be done. Gene
     
  10. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    Cool... I'll start snappin' pics in the morning and post 'em later in the evening in this thread.
     
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  11. Crease
    Joined: May 7, 2002
    Posts: 2,872

    Crease
    Member

    Skipstitch,

    The pics would be greatly appreciated. That's beautiful work. Im gonna be in way over my head, but Im trying to get this 33' 5 window built on a single income, 2 kids, wife drives a nice car kinda budget. Dad gave me an industrial machine, but didn't provide the talent. Im doing this realllly slow. Im proud of the rest of the car and just hoping the interior looks presentable. One way or another it will cause if it sucks Im selling a kidney and makin a trip to see Mr Fatlucky. I'll post some pics in early 2010 when I get it done. [​IMG]
     
  12. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    FatLUcky requires a Kidney!?! I thought the goin' price was an arm & a leg!? Looks like I gotta raise my price [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    This method is pretty straight forward and can be done by anyone. There is a great "cheat" I'll pass along to help you stitch a straight line that will never show in the final product.
     
  13. Crease
    Joined: May 7, 2002
    Posts: 2,872

    Crease
    Member

    Fatluckys is well worth a kidney in my opinion. [​IMG]

    He's a bit higher than the local shop frequented by the chainer crowd, but the work is easily 10 times better. You can't even begin to compare the quality. You and Mr Fatlucky seem to have quality stitching nailed.

    I've got about 100 straight lines to sew. [​IMG] I could use any hints you've got.
     
  14. snapper
    Joined: Jan 4, 2004
    Posts: 531

    snapper
    Member
    from PNW

    Some basic cloth, 40' Ford Coupe....H
     
  15. MIKE-3137
    Joined: Feb 19, 2003
    Posts: 1,578

    MIKE-3137
    Member

    keep the pics coming please, i'm in the same boat with my 37 Tudor, I at least have the bows, and think I could do the basic top, but don't how the sail panels are attached. I think i'm missing some pieces to secure the sides.

    A friend told me I would be better off to order a repo headliner, then use it for a pattern? Seems like a waste there.
     
  16. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 9,685

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

    If I ever quit having mechanical issues. I too intend to replace the headliner on my 37. Its so gross looking, it looks like Dna samples were geysered onto it.
    Here's some info I have been saving. Can't wait for Skipstitches tech and pics. [​IMG]
    headliner install headliners install 2
     
  17. I would say from the pics I have seen that Skipstitch AND Fatlucky are tow of the best thread guys in the country. I am not trying to kiss ass here either, their work speaks for itself.

    Although, Fatlucky is on my shitlist for not stopping by while in town [​IMG] [​IMG].
     
  18. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    Okay, here we go on the first installment. I'll have to apologize cause I have a ton of pix and don't know how to post multiples.... So be patient.

    Step one. Be sure you have good mounting points to attach your headliner to. Most early cars have wood and later cars have some wide metal bands that work well. The thin stock headliner wire bows will not work, as you'll soon see. If you need to make new or non existant ones I suggest makin' them out of wood as it's easy to screw into. Here are two main bows in the Willys. No ryhme or reason to the placement. It just made sense to locate them here....
     

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  19. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    Next up... cut a piece of 1/4" luan plywood to fit the headliner. It should go as far forward and back as possible as well as side to side. The curvature of the roof and how big the door opening is will have an effect on the size, but the bigger the better. Once it's cut and you're happy with the fit, CENTER IT and screw it in place. Being centered is crucial to how the end result turns out!!! Sometimes additional braces may be needed around the edges to hold the luan in place (mostly in larger cars). Keep in mind it must easily fit through the door opening as your final piece will need to as well when it's covered in glue.

    It's a good time to locate any domelights or overhead consoles as well.
     

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  20. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    Okay, now for one of those things you MUST take a BLOOD OATH to know!!! [​IMG] This is the all important above door gripper... similar to whats in Pinto's and '55-57 Chevys.

    Take a piece of butcher paper, spray the back with 3M 77 glue and press it to the top of the door jamb. Trace the opening along the top and exactly at the door opening edge. Generally speaking stop the front just after the door top turns down and just short of that in the rear.
     

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  21. MIKE-3137
    Joined: Feb 19, 2003
    Posts: 1,578

    MIKE-3137
    Member

    Ahh, so ditch the bows, okay. I'm saving this post for sure. Any more progress pics?
     
  22. Levis Classic
    Joined: Oct 7, 2003
    Posts: 4,066

    Levis Classic
    Member

    Thanks for the pics!
     
  23. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    now simply transfer that paper pattern to a piece of 1/4" luan and cut it out... be very careful to make sure the door opening edge is smooth, without wobbles and matches the opening. Like a paint job, prep time taken now will make the final product look better....
     

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  24. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    Okay, now some magic dust..... You'll need a length of product called Ply-Grip. Furniture repair places can get it. It has little rows of sharp teeth on one edge. Position it as the pic shows about 1/8" above the inside bottom edge of the wood piece you've created and staple with a heavy duty stapler in place.
     

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  25. Ryan
    Joined: Jan 2, 1995
    Posts: 18,471

    Ryan
    ADMINISTRATOR
    from Austin, TX
    Staff Member

    Skip.... You do great work man... thanks so much for the pictures...
     
  26. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    then fold and staple the top portion of the tin down and out of the way... if it sticks up past the wood, cut it off......

    Repeat the above for the other side. On early cars, plan to pattern both sides from scratch. They are rarely the same....

     

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  27. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    Thanks Ryan, sorry for usin' up all the bandwidth [​IMG]

    Next we gotta address windlace. I know it's not headliner, but without partially installing it we cannot move on. We use 1/2" sponge rod. Available from any auto upholstery shop. Here it is in da raw...
     

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  28. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    Cut yourself strips of material 4" wide per door the length of the opening. In this case we're usin' bone colored leather. This pic shows both strips and one piece of sponge rod. Spray contact cement on the strips of material. I suggest using industrial contact cement for best results...again available at auto trim shops. Spray it on allow it to tack up. We use three coats of glue before working...

    I glue windlace cause I could NEVER stitch it tight enough to please me.
     

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  29. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    Once the glue is ready, center the core and start to pull the material around it. The core we use as seen above has a raised flat area to use as a guide. Make sure the core doesn't twist or the windlace will look wobbly.... Then....
     

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  30. skipstitch
    Joined: Oct 7, 2001
    Posts: 1,177

    skipstitch
    Member

    Move back about 8" and repeat... close the material around the core. Repeat this to the end. Again be sure not to twist the core...
     

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