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Technical Little tips and tricks for garage hobbyists.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Ron Brown, Jul 30, 2019.

  1. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,406

    Mart
    Member

    If you want a short socket extension, shorter than your shortest one, use two adaptors and adapt up to the next size then back down to the size you are using. I used this the other day when torqueing my heads due to a clearance issue.
     
    fauj, Hamtown Al, Boneyard51 and 4 others like this.
  2. The fellow shortening the bolt and tidying up the threads lost a bit of meat off his knuckle,
    I too have done this too many times with my record (brand) vice so I polished off the pro-
    trustion and save on bandages.
     
    Mart, Six Ball and loudbang like this.
  3. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,406

    Mart
    Member

    ^^ That fellow was me!
     
    Bandit Billy, Six Ball and loudbang like this.
  4. This is an old trick that a lot of you older guys probably already know but;
    when cutting thin sheet metal and you do not have the proper tools to do the job, you can use a skill saw with the blade put on backwards so that it doesn't grab the metal, just kinda grinds it away.
     
  5. ^^ Have done that on roof steel many years ago.
     
    Boneyard51 and loudbang like this.
  6. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,406

    Mart
    Member

    I did something today that worked well.
    I needed to hold a bolt by the thread in the lathe chuck. I used a split die as an improvised collet and was able to grip the bolt. The action of the chuck tightened the die/"collet" onto the thread.
    "It worked for me"

    Mart.
     
    69thumper, fauj, fourspd2quad and 7 others like this.
  7. atch
    Joined: Sep 3, 2002
    Posts: 4,756

    atch
    Member

    I had never heard of a "split die" so looked it up. Interesting...
     
    loudbang likes this.
  8. GaryRestore
    Joined: May 7, 2021
    Posts: 3

    GaryRestore

    following for more :)
     
  9. I seen this posted elsewhere but thought it was a good idea

    FB_IMG_1622723132134.jpg
     
  10. Cool idea. With some "S" hooks you can hang stuff off the front of those too.
     
    Six Ball, loudbang and norms30a like this.
  11. Doublepumper
    Joined: Jun 26, 2016
    Posts: 1,019

    Doublepumper
    Member

    I got tired of my shop vacuum exhaust blowing on everything and creating more dust.
    Found a plastic cup with a taper to the sides (old Tupperware), and cut the bottom out.
    Wedged it into the exhaust outlet port and tied an old sock to it.
    vacsock.jpg
    Works like a champ!
     
  12. j hansen
    Joined: Dec 22, 2012
    Posts: 2,142

    j hansen
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I like this, I have not even thought about it.
    I do not have so many old socks,can I take some old panties instead?
     
    reagen, loudbang, trollst and 4 others like this.
  13. Doublepumper
    Joined: Jun 26, 2016
    Posts: 1,019

    Doublepumper
    Member

    :eek: You have old panties? o_O

    You're not wearing them in place of socks....are you?
     
  14. j hansen
    Joined: Dec 22, 2012
    Posts: 2,142

    j hansen
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    No,,but I have a collection of forgotten panties,which I do not know what to do with them.;)
     
    vtx1800, brEad, LAROKE and 3 others like this.
  15. 48fordnut
    Joined: Nov 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,972

    48fordnut
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I use wife old hose. I think sock would be better.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  16. So....when your wife asks about the panties in your glove box, she actually believes it when you tell her they are 'auxiliary shop vac filters' ? What a silver tongued devil you are!
     
  17. Mart held a bolt by the thread with a split die in his lathe got me thinking a fellow
    could cut half way through a nut, screw it on the thread and tighten that in the lathe.
    You would have to try it to see if everything ran true.
     
    Mart likes this.
  18. 34Larry
    Joined: Apr 25, 2011
    Posts: 1,612

    34Larry
    Member

    I accidently found a way of getting holes drilled through my boxed frame, IN LINE WITH EACH OTER, when mounting my spreader bar, I always get them slightly off when doing so requires they be inline and end up having to drill lager holes than needed to get the bolts in.
    It started with making a template where the hole would be on the outside rail and match marking it so it was in the correct place when applied to the inside rail. Using a six inch "C" clamp to hold and position the templet to the inside, the screw portion of the clamp on the outside, gave me the correct side to side and up/down angle for the drill to make the hole in the inside rail perfectly in line. Not much of tip, but it helped me.
     
  19. And here I was only using my old socks on my jack stands, I'm going to have to buy more new socks so I can have more old socks for all these tips.

    20200113_143503.jpg
     
  20. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 7,550

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Picked these up yesterday at Dollar Tree in the kitchen section. The silicone hand puppet thing is great for grabbing hot, greasy or slippery parts without putting a glove on. Or practicing ventriloquism. Got the ceramic plate just because it had the truck on it, and a deep philosophical message. Or some bad Chinese translating.

    20210717_154653.jpg
     
  21. Truck64
    Joined: Oct 18, 2015
    Posts: 4,633

    Truck64
    Member
    from Ioway

    ^^^ Looks like just the thing for harassing the Beagle...
     
  22. 57JoeFoMoPar
    Joined: Sep 14, 2004
    Posts: 4,935

    57JoeFoMoPar
    Member

    I'm just impressed that your old socks don't have holes in them like mine do.
     
  23. Truck64
    Joined: Oct 18, 2015
    Posts: 4,633

    Truck64
    Member
    from Ioway

    ShopTip: choose a sock style (and color!) you like early in life, and stick with it. Then, you just grab any two at random, and good to go.
     
  24. spanners
    Joined: Feb 24, 2009
    Posts: 1,178

    spanners
    Member

    Used that method the other day and it got me out of the shit. Thanks Mart
     
    fauj, Mart, loudbang and 1 other person like this.
  25. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 6,905

    BJR
    Member

    Always start nuts and bolts by hand first, then use the impact gun. Keeps you from cross threading them.
     
    scotty t, 48fordnut, vtx1800 and 2 others like this.
  26. Elcohaulic
    Joined: Dec 27, 2017
    Posts: 2,020

    Elcohaulic
    Member

    The best thing to clean your greasy hands with is baby oil. It brakes the grease down and softens your hands...
    I've been noticing that the companies that machine bolts start the threads too soon, this makes them so hard to start. They used to leave a 1/8" or so, this way the the treads could connect easier..
    Those old body bolts were so nice to work with..
     
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  27. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,913

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    When I have a bolt that doesn't want to start easily or is slightly misaligned with what I'm trying to screw it into, I just use my belt sander to taper the end of the bolt for a thread or three.........works great.

    Mart mentioned using a split die to hold a threaded part (bolt) in a lathe. You can take a couple of nuts with the correct thread and slit them with a bandsaw. May need to widen the slot a little.....may not. Put the slotted nuts on the bolt a little ways apart and clamp them in the lathe chuck. If you aren't tight enough, widen the slots and try again.
     
    Elcohaulic and 48fordnut like this.
  28. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,406

    Mart
    Member

    I am currently wiring my 32 sedan. I have a very simple tip for you. If you lay one wire along what you intend to be the routing for more wires, it is useful to have an easily undone method of holding the wires together. Easily undone so you can keep laying extra wires in.
    I just cut numerous pieces of insulating tape (electrical tape) about 5" long. I turn the first half inch over on each end and use these strips to hold the wires together, wrapping them around and sticking sticky side to sticky side to hold it together. It can easily be undone by holding the tabs and pulling apart and can be reused numerous times if kept clean.
    I got the idea after seeing a similar method used on the bags containing loaves of bread.
    Mart.
     
  29. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,624

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yeah....I use velcro strips for the same, until I get all the wires in place then zip tie and remove velcro...
     
    Six Ball, Texas57, fauj and 4 others like this.
  30. olscrounger
    Joined: Feb 23, 2008
    Posts: 4,244

    olscrounger
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    ^^^ This I use the twisty ties that come on bread etc for temp holding and grouping of wires.
     
    LowKat, Six Ball, GuyW and 9 others like this.

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