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Technical Little tips and tricks for garage hobbyists.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Ron Brown, Jul 30, 2019.

  1. phat rat
    Joined: Mar 18, 2001
    Posts: 4,344

    phat rat
    Member

    Were you aware of there now being a supposed 9 hr battery for the 20 volt Dewalt
     
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  2. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 6,309

    BJR
    Member

    The Dewalt 20 volt cordless impact drivers are the greatest tool ever.
     
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  3. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,522

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    No i wasnt. Damn. These are expensive as they are. Fraid to know how much those would be. Lol


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  4. ken bogren
    Joined: Jul 6, 2010
    Posts: 666

    ken bogren
    Member

    Dewalt seems to have a couple 20 volt impact drivers, which one are you guys talking about?
     
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  5. big john d
    Joined: Nov 24, 2011
    Posts: 140

    big john d
    Member
    from ma

    i live in the woods we get a ton of leaves in the fall rake rake rake unless you fire up the pressure washer and blow them into the woods and lets not forget the wonderful upside down oil filters on the slant sixes
     
  6. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,522

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    One of my drills is brushless. Great power and physically smaller. Its the one i reach for most the time


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  7. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,914

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Like most, I started out years and years ago with the Craftsman's and other brands cordless drill, something like 9.6 volts, was nice, but... Then the 12 volts things showed up and as soon as I bought one of those the 14 volts Dewalt showed.... yep, had to gave one of those..... used the crap out of it, had a few batteries, could work most of the day with it! But was pricey and BIG. Then you couldn’t get batteries for them. So it’s on the shelf.

    Then the 19.6 Craftsman showed up, I’ve got tons of tools and batteries and chargers for it, so I’m sticking with it......untill I can’t!
    But my leaf blower and chain saw..... they are 56 volt! !! Ah,ah, agh!
    What ever you buy today....... will be obsolete tomorrow.......so enjoy them while you can! Lol

    Mine still work for me.






    Bones
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2020
  8. pitalplace
    Joined: Jun 25, 2006
    Posts: 31

    pitalplace
    Member

    I had a 18v Milwaukee but my wife took it.
     
  9. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 6,309

    BJR
    Member

    The Dewalt brushless impact drivers are the best, but I have both and they both work great.
     
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  10. donno
    Joined: Feb 28, 2015
    Posts: 412

    donno
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    X2, I wash our cars in the garage and blow water of with a cordless leaf blower.
     
  11. phat rat
    Joined: Mar 18, 2001
    Posts: 4,344

    phat rat
    Member

    Here's a 9hr https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Dewalt...830099?hash=item3d9c275b93:g:ulEAAOSwvRJeLjye

    I just found there's now a 12hr https://www.ebay.com/itm/DEWALT-FLE...903889&hash=item42114d5ae3:g:jswAAOSwJBdeLlPv

    I have a number of different sizes of these 2,5,6 and 9hr. I have a reciprocal saw, impact wrench, drill, impact driver and a weed wacker that are all Dewalt 20v.
     
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  12. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,273

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    Nothing Makita, When I get to it I'll post a list here.
    One of the problems here is that we are off the grid and having chargers always plugged in isn't possible. My whole house and shop run off of batteries. We are a 24v DC power plant. Using batteries to charge batteries is an unnecessary step and you loose power at every conversion. I'm usually better off plugging in the tool and just letting the big batteries do it. I do have enough extra equipment now that I could put together a smaller solar changing station. Or figure out how to charge from DC right to the tool batteries.
     
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  13. Tip: live in the 60's...but not shop-wise. There are now cheap nitrile gloves and safety glasses out there. Plus LED cordless lights and cheap magnetic bowls and trays to hold loose screws and washers. And camera phones. Make your garage work as easy for yourself as you can!
     
  14. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,273

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    How about the remote cameras that will fit into a spark plug hole. and drain or filler hole or down a carb throat. See under the dash or inside the trans.
     
  15. Doublepumper
    Joined: Jun 26, 2016
    Posts: 597

    Doublepumper
    Member

    ^ Been thinking I'd like one of those. Bet they would come in very handy.
     
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  16. And don't forget those cheap thermal hand held thermometers with the laser sight. Perfect for working out which cylinder is misbehaving, seeing what your cooling system is doing, etc.
     
  17. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,914

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Which wheel bearing is going out. Tire pressure. Lots of things!






    Bones
     
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  18. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 13,328

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    Found a neat video on alternative approach to fabbing 90 degree angle on square tubing.
    May not be the quickest and not to everyones liking but I was impressed.

     
  19. mohr hp
    Joined: Nov 18, 2009
    Posts: 235

    mohr hp
    Member
    from Georgia

    When enlarging holes in wire terminals, clamp the terminal between 2 pieces of scrap lexan. Holds the terminal still and allows you to see what you're doing. Use a uni-bit.
     
  20. Kentuckian
    Joined: Nov 26, 2008
    Posts: 736

    Kentuckian
    Member

    A quick and sure way to determine the outside diameter of tubing or anything round is to use open end wrenches as measuring tools. Last week I used a few different open end wrenches to determine whether the rear sway bar on a '65 Corvette was 9/16, 5/8 or 3/4. A 5/16 or 3/8 open end wrench will quickly determine what size steel fuel line a car has.
     
  21. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 6,512

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    I always cut and save the cords from dead electric tools etc.. A drill needed a new cord the other day so I grabbed a leftover cord and tried to strip off the thick outer sheath with a razor blade to get to the wires. Kept cutting into the wire insulation. My wire strippers don't go big enough for outer sheathing.

    Then I tried cutting a small slice in the sheathing between the two wires at the end, grabbed both sides with pliers and pulled. Sheath ripped apart without damaging the wires. Maybe there is a better way but that worked.
     
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  22. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,522

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    dont have a tip...gotta a question...has anyone figured out a way to store a half used tube of silicone without it developing a plug so thick you cant get to the rest of the silicone inside....i bet i've thrown away more silicone in plugged tubes than i've used.
     
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  23. I don't know if it will work everytime, but I used a wine cork in a tube of silicone and 2 or 3 months later I opened it and it was usable.
     
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  24. They make a little plastic deal that you push down the neck of the the tube to keep the silicone or whatever product from drying out in between uses. I see them at HD right there in the isle w the caulk.

    Sent from my LM-Q720 using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  25. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,273

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    Depending on how big of a hole you made when you cut the end off a big nail or screw works pretty well. Or ope the end off well and wrap tape around the outside.
     
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  26. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,435

    GearheadsQCE
    Member

    The best way to keep silicone from hardening is keep it in the refrigerator. RTV stands for 'Room Temperature Vulcanizing'.
    Besides, this gives you a good reason to have a fridge in shop. As if you needed another one.

    This has been posted here before but I didn't start doing it until about a year ago. Haven't wasted a drop since.
     
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  27. RidgeRunner
    Joined: Feb 9, 2007
    Posts: 848

    RidgeRunner
    Member
    from Western MA

    Long nail with an OD to closely match the ID of the cut off tip has always worked well for me. There, probably just jinxed myself :rolleyes:

    Ed
     
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  28. carolina chevrolet
    Joined: Nov 14, 2018
    Posts: 56

    carolina chevrolet
    Member

    I use wire nuts on the ends of silicon tubes to keep it from drying out.
     
  29. 34Larry
    Joined: Apr 25, 2011
    Posts: 1,208

    34Larry
    Member

    I also use them sparingly black ones about 3/16 wide. I do my very best to hide them also.
     
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