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Technical Little tips and tricks for garage hobbyists.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Ron Brown, Jul 30, 2019.

  1. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,521

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    a little grease on the seal and hand tightening of oil filters will eliminate this kinda nonsense. a result 944A8583-EDD6-44FE-8C0C-7E32F94084F5.jpeg 04D97588-C1BD-4D29-91CC-660B15CCADFE.jpeg of trying to change the filter on a car I just bought, I actually had to remove the oil pan to get this thing off.
     
  2. To get an oil filter off recently I drilled 4 holes in a big washer which was then welded to a
    piece of 1/4" x 1" x 18" flat stock.
    Next 4 sheet metal screws were screwed into the filter bottom and I used an adjustable
    wrench to turn the flat stock.
    Weird what a guy has to do sometimes!
     
  3. 6sally6
    Joined: Feb 16, 2014
    Posts: 1,072

    6sally6
    Member

    Coulda just drove a 'trashed' phillips head screwdriver(a bigg'un) through the filter.
    What bites even worser is the turdz that jack-down on the oil drain plug so much that you roundoff the shoulder of the drain plug/bolt. The fix for that is a cut off wheel and slice off two sides of the plug.....then get on it with a crescent hammer.
    HATE to 'come behind somebody' and hafta change oil & filter.......Jus do it myself
    6sally6
     
  4. SilverJimmy
    Joined: Dec 2, 2008
    Posts: 39

    SilverJimmy
    Member

    In my years selling tools I found the guys having the most trouble removing oil filters and drain plugs were the ones working at dealerships. That first service was usually included with the purchase, and it was the most important one ever for the vehicle. Nothing is tighter than a OEM filter, and it seemed that the Dodge Boys were the worst offenders!
     
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  5. wuga
    Joined: Sep 21, 2008
    Posts: 331

    wuga
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    After 25 pages and six months, this gets moved? Isn't this what traditional hot rodding is all about, doing by the seat of your pants.
    Warren
     
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  6. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,908

    Boneyard51
    Member

    In my hoard of tools, you will find all kinds of filter wrenches. One that has never failed to get a filter off is one that looks like a big spring circling the filter. It is designed to “grip” the filter 360 degrees, so it doesn’t crush it. They come in different sizes, I think, I only have one and it won’t work on some of the smaller filters.
    I have some various “strap” wrenches and chain wrenches that work great also. Also some three fingered gear type . And I have some bent regular type oil filter wrenches , also! Lol








    Bones
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
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  7. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,521

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    yea i have several strap and band type wrenches as well...wouldn't even budge it.
     
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  8. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,908

    Boneyard51
    Member

    How did you get it off? It looks like there are a lot of channel lock marks on the end of the filter. How did removing the pan help? Able to get better access? What finally got it off?






    Bones
     
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  9. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,429

    GearheadsQCE
    Member

    I worked on the lube rack at a Chevrolet dealer in 1970. I had one filter that wouldn't budge after all the tricks and tools mentioned here were tried. The final thing was cutting all the canister away with an air chisel. Then walking off the remaining flange using the air chisel with a flat punch. The vibration works better than brute force.

    Used this a couple of times later teaching Auto Shop. Also helps to apply the correct verbiage while doing this.
     
  10. RidgeRunner
    Joined: Feb 9, 2007
    Posts: 847

    RidgeRunner
    Member
    from Western MA

    My worst experience: Filter defied all my "regular wrenches" including strap, chain etc. Large channel locks crushed the can and big screwdriver through the can just tore it to pieces. Wound up drilling a couple holes in a short piece of scrap flat stock to match the holes in the base, brazed a couple bolts in them to make a pin wrench, and then brazed a T handle made with scrap round rod in the center of the backside. Very crude looking but finally got the job done. Left it hanging on the wall for years as cheap insurance against ever having to go through the process again, might have since been lost during some moves.

    Ed
     
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  11. Mr T body
    Joined: Nov 2, 2005
    Posts: 2,133

    Mr T body
    Alliance Vendor
    from SoCal

    First filter change on my 3500 with a Cummins was the worst I've ever had. You have to reach into the side of the engine through a hole in the right wheel well. All the usual tricks didn't work (no room to rotate the filter). Finally wound up buying a filter socket (admitting defeat), then had to weld a 1/2 to 3/8 adapter on it so I could get an 18" long 1/2" breaker bar on it. Piece of cake now....
     
  12. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,908

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Have used both of these methods over the years, but doing a lot of hydraulic cylinder work , I used my “ spanner” wrenches in the holes of the filter after I tore the canister off!
    And air chisels can be your friend!







    Bones
     
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  13. error404
    Joined: Dec 11, 2012
    Posts: 255

    error404
    Member
    from CA

    the worst oil filter I had to change was when I purchased my 2000 F250 7.3 (used), started out with wrenches, straps and every sort of "off the shelf" filter removal device I could borrow from friends. That wasn't working, then tried the "drill two holes through the filter and insert a screwdriver all the way through" method, which just started ripping the holes. After trying on a few drilled holes, the can of the filter finally ripped completely off of the base (yes, completely off).

    So the final method (which worked), since the can of the filter was already off, was to use a brass punch and a 3 lb hammer pounding sideways on the circle of holes on the thick steel filter base counter clockwise until it finally threaded off. I was hammering on it for a good 10 minutes before it even started to move. Then once it started to move, I still had to pound on it for like 5 minutes, as it slowly unthreaded. Only until the last full turn of the filter base was I able to turn it by hand. It had to be pounded for the majority of the turns.

    And it wasn't that I didn't have good access to the filter, I actually had pretty good access. it was just STUCK!

    I was 100% expecting the threads to be shot, but some how they were perfect! And the new filter threaded right on. I have no idea why that filter was on there so tight, and I started to wonder if they sold the truck knowing the filter was stuck. It was EXTREMELY stuck, way worst than I could have imagined. And every filter I've ever put on it has never had this problem. Actually, I've never had problems taking filters off that I installed myself. Normally I don't even need a wrench or strap to remove them. Just but both hands on it, and twist.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
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  14. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,521

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    My biggest problem was access. This was in my roadster with 32 rails. Have a heavy duty steel band type wrench that ive had for probably 40 yrs that I had even reinforced the handle on by welding a steel rod inside the handle for strength. Bent it so bad it is probably unusable now. After pulling oil pan it allowed me to get about an 1/8th of a turn on the filter with a big assed pair of channel locks. Man what a nitemare.
     
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  15. Doesn't everyone use Locktite on their filters???:oops:
     
  16. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,521

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Lol.....so yer the guy!


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  17. Elcohaulic
    Joined: Dec 27, 2017
    Posts: 850

    Elcohaulic
    Member

    Nothing brings old vinyl back to life like baby oil..
     
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  18. 65pacecar
    Joined: Sep 22, 2010
    Posts: 1,809

    65pacecar
    Member
    from KY, AZ

    Works great on old seats etc. but not on LP’s ;-).


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
  19. David Coleman
    Joined: Oct 15, 2019
    Posts: 29

    David Coleman
    Member

    Suggested the leaf blower to the tech servicing our home's propane heater/air conditioner. He did, and was thrilled how well it worked. Sometimes old guys are worth listening to,
     
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  20. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,908

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Get the new cordless leaf blower! Best thing since roll up windows! Really!






    Bones
     
  21. David Coleman
    Joined: Oct 15, 2019
    Posts: 29

    David Coleman
    Member

    I did wash a filthy LP with soap, water and a sponge. I let it drip dry, then played it on a Chinese record player, and plugged the player's outlet into the mike port of my lap top. Using Audacity (free software) I was able to make MP3 files. Might technically have lost some sound but it sounds great to my old ear.
     
  22. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 6,307

    BJR
    Member

    Use a 2" piece of vacuum hose over the end of a spark plug to start it in those hard to get at plug holes.
     
  23. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,521

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Got the 20v dewalt blower. I agree. Tons of power in a small package. Handiest damn tool goin
     
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  24. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 3,908

    Boneyard51
    Member

    I got the EZgo one 56 volts! I like it. Then I bought the EZGo cordless chain saw. Now I have two batteries and two chargers. The batteries interchange, so when blowing with one, the other can be charging......non stop leaf blowing! I need it, I have ninety trees on 7/8 acre!








    Bones
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2020
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  25. chevy57dude
    Joined: Dec 10, 2007
    Posts: 5,485

    chevy57dude
    Member

    On the subject of leaf blowers - great tool for drying off the car after washing. So much water gets trapped behind the stainless. No touch method.
     
  26. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 988

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    I bought a Kobalt. Works great, very light.......wife loves it. That and the 3year warranty on the battery . Most cordless tools don't have a 3 year battery. I write the purchase date on the tool and have a drawer to keep receipts. On sale at Lowes only paid about $100.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2020
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  27. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,267

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    I have an assortment of useless cordless battery tools purchased over the years. The next shop cleanup will include ALL of them in the trash, tools batteries and chargers. When I start again it will be all one brand that use the same battery in a way that I can always have at least two fully charged batteries on hand.
     
  28. studebakerjoe
    Joined: Jul 7, 2015
    Posts: 680

    studebakerjoe
    Member

    Six Ball, any of the old 9.6 volt Makita cordless drills in that pile?
     
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  29. hotrod1948
    Joined: Jan 17, 2011
    Posts: 448

    hotrod1948
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Milton, WI

    Rather than throwing them away, list what you have. They may make good additions to the stuff other HAMBers have
     
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  30. Ron Brown
    Joined: Jul 6, 2015
    Posts: 1,521

    Ron Brown
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Did that exact thing about two years ago. All these take same batteries. 6 batteries and 9 tools 2 chargers. Dont pull an air wrench out but once twice year. By the way, the cordless vacuum is really nice for cars and boats [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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