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Hot Rods List of Speed Equipment Manufactuers that Began in California?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by SLOson, Jun 7, 2020.

  1. tltony
    Joined: Jan 11, 2009
    Posts: 291

    tltony
    Member
    from El Cajon

    Did anyone mention Keith Black Racing Engines.
     
  2. tltony
    Joined: Jan 11, 2009
    Posts: 291

    tltony
    Member
    from El Cajon

    Speed O Motive in South Gate.
     
  3. 32partsguy
    Joined: Jul 16, 2012
    Posts: 83

    32partsguy
    Member
    from DFW,Texas!

    Don Zig Magnetos?
     
  4. 65pacecar
    Joined: Sep 22, 2010
    Posts: 2,261

    65pacecar
    Member
    from KY, AZ

    American Custom Cam in Glendora. I think late 60s to early 70s startup.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2020
    jimmy six likes this.
  5. SLOson
    Joined: May 10, 2020
    Posts: 17

    SLOson
    Member
    from California

    KB is on the list.
     
  6. lumpy 63
    Joined: Aug 2, 2010
    Posts: 1,309

    lumpy 63
    Member

  7. lumpy 63
    Joined: Aug 2, 2010
    Posts: 1,309

    lumpy 63
    Member

    Lenco equipment Co.
    Bob Stewart axles.
     
  8. gt350hr
    Joined: Sep 21, 2011
    Posts: 31

    gt350hr
    Member
    from So Cal

     
  9. gt350hr
    Joined: Sep 21, 2011
    Posts: 31

    gt350hr
    Member
    from So Cal

    Bill Thomas Race cars
    Bill Stroppe /(later) HMS
    H&L Speed Improvements (Roll bars)
    Norris Cams
    Babe Erson cams
    W&H Du Coil
    Tyree Headers
    BRC components
    Cooks Machine works
    Fletcher Chassis
    SPS ( high grade bolts before ARP)
    Lockerman Porting Service
    Jocko's Porting Service
    Slover's Porting Service.
    Mullin's racing heads.
    Buddy Barr casting Co.
    Navarro Speed Equipment
    Thunderbird Products/Ermie Imerso ent.
    Segal Manufacturing
    Ed Cholockian ent ( first commercial "racing" T shirts & early decal source)
    Berry Plastiglass
    Fiberglass Trends
    Cal Auto ( fiberglass )
    Astro Wheels
    Genuine Suspension
    Grant Piston Rings
    Pacific Ring Co
    Childs and Albert
    Falconer & Dunn
    Al Bartz
    Crankshaft Co
    C-T Automotive
    Traco
    ( all from memory and there are more)
     
    Hot Rods Ta Hell likes this.
  10. A Boner
    Joined: Dec 25, 2004
    Posts: 5,729

    A Boner
    Member

    Back when Kalifornia was California!
     
    jimmy six likes this.
  11. fortynut
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 989

    fortynut
    Member

    Horsepower Engineering in Pasadena. I don't owe Doug Robinson the dust off my shoes, but the 'no-name- headers from the boys on the benches in the back are probably on more cars than those from the 'big boys', It's for them I'm posting this.
     
    jimmy six likes this.
  12. flatheadgary
    Joined: Jul 17, 2007
    Posts: 818

    flatheadgary
    Member
    from boron,ca

    anybody mention henry's machine shop in orange county area. they made all the cut down rear ends and custom length axles back in he day. plus more.
     
  13. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 7,139

    jimmy six
    Member

    It’s Taxifornia now!
     
  14. flatheadgary
    Joined: Jul 17, 2007
    Posts: 818

    flatheadgary
    Member
    from boron,ca

    even the left are getting tired of the crap here!!
     
  15. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,892

    jnaki




    Hello,

    If you are talking about the original Henry's Machine Works, it was located in Northeast Long Beach. It was one of the cool shops in this almost 1/2 mile stretch of shops catering to custom cars, hot rods, drag racing and just plain old cruising around people. The location was just North of Del Amo and Cherry Avenue. Yes, that Cherry Avenue and the "secret" dragstrip built into the quiet street next to a couple of cemeteries.

    The Cherry Avenue history started for all of So Cal hot rod/drag racers down almost 5 miles South at Reath Automotive Shop on the corner of 10th and Cherry Ave. A relative "gold mine" of the top hot rod shops in the whole area of Long Beach.

    The shops were everything from chrome accessories, muffler shop, a wheel alignment shop, a wheel/tire shop, a transmission build/repair/install shop, engine building/modifying shop, and Henry's Machine Works. Henry's did just about everything custom for drag racers and modifying hot rod metal work. In the same area was the famous Jocko's Porting Service building, too.

    Jnaki

    The location was just past the borders of Bixby Knolls and was a one stop shopping for most local hot rod teenagers and those famous Long Beach drag racers that grew up in that area. Even the Lakewood, CA drag racers and hot rodders came West to these shops as the work was exemplary and had recommendations from almost everywhere. Henry's was right in the middle of the area, until they moved in the later years.
     
    65pacecar likes this.
  16. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,892

    jnaki

    upload_2020-8-15_4-50-46.png
    Bruce Alexander created Bruce’s Slicks

    Hello,
    When we got started in drag racing, most of the top modified cars were running Bruce Slicks. The street roadster class and some altered coupes were using the narrow Bruce Slicks. The top racers were using much wider slicks from Bruce’s Tires in Oakland, CA.
    upload_2020-8-15_4-53-12.png
    Cook and Bedwell record holder from So Cal

    https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/what%E2%80%99s-the-best-1932-ford-body-style.1171186/page-2#post-13319978

    We purchased some 7 inch wide Bruce Slicks in 1958-59 for our 58 Impala at the drags. We found out that if we used the slicks, we would be in the Gas Coupe and Sedan Class. But, we were otherwise qualified for the A/Stock factory class. Slicks were allowed in any car during the time trials, but when the class eliminations began, all tires in our class had to be standard factory supplied or else.

    The Bruce Slicks were the best at the time and our time trials gave us some valuable experience and slightly quicker E.T. runs. There were plenty of other A/Stock and other classes that did the same thing. Slicks for the time trials and stock tread tires for the class eliminations.
    1958 Impala Bruce Slicks then stock tires for eliminations.

    Then the “cheater slicks” with grooves, came into play, trying to fall within the grooved tire category like factory tires. But, eventually, they were not allowed due to the fact that they were just regular slicks with several grooves cut into them. Plus, for those that tried the “cheater slicks”, they worked, but not as good as the regular slicks, like Bruce’s Slicks. So, for the stock factory classes, it was back to the standard tires that came with the car.

    Jnaki

    Bruce Slicks were one of the first from California. Gradually, the compound M&H used started to take over the whole scene, everywhere. Our 7 inch wide Bruce Slicks worked well. (on Chevy rims, they fit inside of the rear fenders without any modifications.) But, in our next phase of the 1940 Willys 671 SBC coupe, our larger M&H slicks were on order, ready for pickup in Los Angeles, but never made it to Long Beach. Those Bruce Slicks worked well after the Willys Coupe, as we put them back on the now, modified, 1958 Impala,again, for our weekend encounters all over So Cal.
    upload_2020-8-15_4-55-31.png
    https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/friday-art-show-5-24-19.1151067/#post-13092468 what goes around, comes around…

    https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/early-racing-slicks.1036192/#post-11737593 Bruce Slicks
    https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/nostalgia-drag-slicks.1179300/#post-13393792 moxley + bruce

     
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  17. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,892

    jnaki

    upload_2020-10-4_4-53-25.png

    "In 1946, Robert Paxton McCulloch moved his company to California, changed its name to McCulloch Motors. In 1953, he launched the VS57 supercharger, the result of those earlier patents."

    "By 1957, McCulloch had set up a separate division within the company to produce the superchargers under the Paxton name.? In 1958, McCulloch sold the Paxton division and, once again, changed the name of his company to the McCulloch Corporation."


    Hello,

    With the whine evident when a hot rod or even a stock T-Bird or Ford sedan rolls into the drive-in parking lot gives notice that this car is hot. So, with the development of the centrifugal supercharger from McCulloch/Paxton, So Cal was out in front of that technology. Factory support and installations did wonders for those that used the same technology on the race cars at the drags.

    For us, the best sample of a McCulloch/Paxton Centrifugal Supercharger was the installation on Junior Thompson’s 1941 Studebaker Sedan for the B/Gas coupes and sedan class.
    upload_2020-10-4_4-54-25.png
    Jr. Thompson SOUND at Lions Dragstrip

    Jnaki

    Despite starting out in the Midwest, Robert Paxton McCulloch developed the centrifugal supercharger (McCulloch/Paxton) in California.

    upload_2020-10-4_4-55-27.png
     
    65pacecar likes this.
  18. denis4x4
    Joined: Apr 23, 2005
    Posts: 3,552

    denis4x4
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Colorado

    Nobody has mentioned what I consider a very important outfit: SPEED EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION (SEMA). Now in Diamond Bar, started in Alhambra. First SEMA Shows were in Southern California.
     
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  19. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 7,139

    jimmy six
    Member

    They need break it up into at least 2; Speciality has taken over for Speed, but there should be a WEMA just for Wheels...
     
    65pacecar likes this.
  20. fortynut
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 989

    fortynut
    Member

    I don't think Super Bell Axles was mentioned. I met Jim Ewing once when he had a shop behind Birdman Stewart's, that was during his badass Bonneville bound Studebaker days. I was driving my then ratty '57 Chevy Pickup and he was bagging on me to finish it --- which I never got around to doing before I sold it. Damn nice fellow and it's tragic how his life ended. At least he got a good send off, so I hear. He certainly made his contribution to the Hot Rod and Street Rod market.
     
  21. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,892

    jnaki







    Hey Guys,

    It has been an honor to be part of the original group of small speed shops that was invited to be a part of the So Cal shops dealers and manufacturers. @ denis4x4 knows, having been a part of the vast history. It all began in 1963 when a group of small manufacturers who were suppliers of performance equipment for early hot rods organized their fledgling industry and called it "Speed Equipment Manufacturers Association" (SEMA).

    They encouraged a lot of little speed shops to tie in with the big names prior to the official announcement in 1963. When we were starting out in 1959-60 as a so-called "engine building speed shop," we made cards to send to the big companies to be able to get the dealer cost for all parts necessary for our business.
    upload_2020-10-4_16-8-58.png
    We were sent all manufacturer's catalogs and price sheets. The more we ordered, the bigger the discount as it applied to us. The envelopes sent with a letter introducing us and the cards inside made us "dealers" or a small speed shop. We did have a certified business license for our backyard garage stuff. That original speed shop list of every one of the different dealers has come and gone over the years.

    But, at the time, our friends had a one stop shop for all speed parts and accessories. Motors? We had two partial rebuilds and upgrades in plenty of speed parts, multiple carburetors, shifter kits, custom wheels and tire packages, etc. Our own builds were for the Impala and friend's cars.


    We lived in a R-1, R-2 neighborhood that had several small companies that took over empty houses for their businesses. A leather shop, a clothing/jacket mfg, a gift shop, and a photo business, etc were samples of businesses in a residential area. They were all within a block or two of the full-on businesses on the main drag.

    Time had changed by 1963 when it became big time with all of the huge manufacturers in place. But, if we wanted to join, we could have. We were on an original speed shop list from 1960. Those dealers/manufacturers who eventually made up the original SEMA group in 1963 created and distributed the list to every little speed shop in all of LA and Orange County. We were happy to be on that list as it now gave us some credibility and buying power. We ran with the small speed shop for a while, but did not join the original SEMA in 1963-64.

    Jnaki

    My brother had already been through a year and a half of recovery and his life was going in a different direction. He like surfing from a time before our Willys Coupe, so he returned to that for part of the recovery process. The other part was buying a new 250cc desert racing motorcycle. He told our mom, who was worried to death, that it was for his recovery and that he would only ride it on the huge field near the refineries of Wilmington, just a few blocks from our house. Now, our dealer list included motorcycle shops and dealer/manufacturers.

    So, the end of our small speed shop business was officially 1965, when he was back in an L.A. university and I was starting with a move away from home to go to a different college, far from home, in the Northern California Bay Area.

    Note: SEMA ANNOUNCES eMARKETPLACE SOLUTION

    "SEMA, the Specialty Equipment Market Association, announced today that it is offering an online marketplace to allow manufacturers and resellers in the specialty automotive segment to connect and conduct business. Taking place Nov. 2-6, SEMA360 was created after industry members expressed a need for a viable marketplace solution in the absence of the 2020 SEMA Show."



    They have changed over the years and now encompasses almost every aspect of the car industry. It is not just for hot rods and drag racing parts from the So Cal region.
    From this: "Speed Equipment Manufacturers Association" (SEMA).
    To this:
    "Specialty Equipment Market Association"





     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2020
    65pacecar and Sky Six like this.
  22. patsurf
    Joined: Jan 18, 2018
    Posts: 405

    patsurf

    well,while on ignition...--pounden magnetos !-flatheads through o/heads,for a few decades....
     

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