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Technical Lifting Olds body off of frame

Discussion in 'Traditional Customs' started by Dad Was A Racer, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. Dad Was A Racer
    Joined: Oct 7, 2014
    Posts: 84

    Dad Was A Racer
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    So I have my '56 Olds (four door Super 88 sedan) stripped down and ready to media blast. With the car at this stage, I know the best bet is to pull the body off the frame and put it on a rotisserie for blasting and painting.

    I don't have floor lift or an overhead crane set up, so I was considering using railroad jacks, etc. to support the body and roll the frame out.

    I know at least a few of you have done frame-off's and I'm curious what your "technique" is? Most importantly, is it necessary to weld in cross supports in a "post" car (sedan) with no doors, glass, etc?
     
  2. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 4,276

    BJR
    Member
    from Minnesota

    Get 3 of your biggest strongest friends and four 55 gallon drums. Have a 5th friend to move the cross supports that will sit on the drums and support the body. He will also move the drums into place when you and friends lift the body off of the frame. Take 4 ten foot long 2x6 's and nail 2 of them together to use as cross braces that go under the body and sit on the 55 gallon drums. One set for the front and one set for the back of the body. That's how I did my 49 Buick.
     
  3. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 5,930

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    Here's my 46. Disregard the OT modifications. I removed all the body to frame bolts and used solid lengths of timber bolted to firewall feet and rear body under the trunk after I'd raised the body slightly at each end by using an engine lifter. Ensure that the timber or RHS steel is strong enough to take the weight of the body and use larger and heavier industrial type jacks stands than 'El cheapo' parts store variety.
    As expected practice safe work practices at all times being mindful of that jack stands need to be placed out wide to allow the frame to later roll out from under the body without catching on the jack stands. The heavier stands have a solid foundation with a wider base and are more stable with weight at a height.
    Next work out where the frame will sit with no wheels as you'll only need to raise the front and rear of the body just enough so the rear chassis kick up clears the floor pan. I'd previously removed the springs which made it a lot easier as I could get the frame low on the bump stops.
    I then jacked up the frame and removed the wheels lowering it onto the four (4) vehicle positing jacks allowing me to then roll it out from under the body. The vehicle positioning jacks are handy and allow you to easily move heavy objects around. After I took the frame out I put the wheels back on. Using the vehicle positioning jacks I was able to roll the body to the other shed bay. I then rolled the frame back into the other bay where body with frame were originally parked.
    This was all accomplished single handed without too much of a sweat. A bit fiddly and time consuming in the confines of my 20'x20' shed however it's the only way to do it right. You don't have any obstructions to contend with etc etc.
    Depending on what you want to do, you can lower the body down for safety as it's more stable at a lower height when working in or under it.
    When it came to putting the frame back under the body, I just did things in reverse and dropped the frame onto the vehicle positioning jacks to slide back under the body. Job done, beer o'clock. :D;) Body off.jpg

    Chassis brace.jpg

    20170305_140749.jpg

    20170309_180424.jpg
     
    302GMC and MMM1693 like this.
  4. I would x brace the body before lifting. Just to be safe. That is a lot of body to be moving around.
     
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  5. hrm2k
    Joined: Oct 2, 2007
    Posts: 3,353

    hrm2k
    Member

    we pulled the body off the frame on our 51 fleetline using our cherry picker with an extention.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Dad Was A Racer
    Joined: Oct 7, 2014
    Posts: 84

    Dad Was A Racer
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I knew you guys would have the solution... Thanks to all!
     
  7. Call me when you get ready, I’ll come back up and help.
     
    harpo1313 likes this.
  8. Dad Was A Racer
    Joined: Oct 7, 2014
    Posts: 84

    Dad Was A Racer
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    You can bet on that!
     
    harpo1313 likes this.
  9. 1954 rocket 98
    Joined: Apr 18, 2011
    Posts: 210

    1954 rocket 98
    Member

    hears how i did my 54 olds. boat trailers work well for putting the body on and doing work on it.
    a bunch of cement blocks, 2 1/2" pipe front and back, a good floor jack, plenty of wood blocking and your good. an engine hoist also helps.
    20170916_150953 small.jpg 20170916_151017 small.jpg 20170916_172345 small.jpg 20170917_135131 small.jpg 20170917_152609 small.jpg 20170917_152654 small.jpg 20170917_181319 small.jpg 20170924_185141 small.jpg
     
    oldsjoe and Bandit Billy like this.
  10. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 4,276

    BJR
    Member
    from Minnesota

    The key to using cement blocks to support anything, is to always have a block of wood on the top. It spreads the weight out so you don't have a pressure point to crack the block. Just like 54 rocket 98 did in his pictures.
     
    oldsjoe likes this.

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