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Let's Talk Cyclecars

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Bigcheese327, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,228

    noboD
    Member

    15522366721_5a5bd67a00_b.jpg Here is a Auto Red Bug with a Dodge Brothers starter generator for power. A friend has one and there is one in AACA museum.
     
  2. ROADSTER1927
    Joined: Feb 14, 2009
    Posts: 2,764

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    That is not original! Sorry
     
  3. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,228

    noboD
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    Google is your friend. Made by the Automotive Electrical Service Corp. in North Bergen, N.J. Made from 1916 to 1929 with most of the electric ones made in the later years. The big battery box housed 2 six volt batteries wired in series.
     
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  4. ROADSTER1927
    Joined: Feb 14, 2009
    Posts: 2,764

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    True but we were talking about a Brigs and Stratton! Gary
     
  5. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 863

    Kume
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    Reminds me of this old battery box I have had kicking around in my workshop for years
    bat1.jpg batt.jpg
     
  6. fredvv44
    Joined: Dec 11, 2013
    Posts: 419

    fredvv44
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    I was referring to the reply that someone made an electric buckboard suing an old starter/generator for the motor. I doubt that back then they would have thought about regenerative braking.
     
  7. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 789

    SR100
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    It started out as the Smith Flyer, made by A.O. Smith, but they sold out to Briggs and Stratton just after WWI. Briggs built the gas version for five years and sold out to Automotive Standards (sometimes listed as Auto Electric Service), who made the Smith/Briggs buck board for a few years, but also designed an electric version around the Northeast starter/generator made for Dodge. They called their buckboards (gas and electric) the Red Bug, sometimes listed as the Auto Red Bug. The electric version lasted until 1930.
    As the ad portrays, it was fairly successful as a toy for the wealthy. They also sold to resorts as a novelty.
    upload_2020-4-3_7-2-19.jpeg

    upload_2020-4-3_7-15-15.jpeg
    Ettore Bugatti driving his son's Red Bug. The uncomfortable gentleman with the pipe is the king of Belgium!
     
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  8. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 632

    motoklas
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    from Bern, CH

    ...obviously that we are talking about both of variants:
    ~ gasoline-engined powered "fifth wheel" (Smith Flyer and later BS Flyer),
    ~ and electric-motor powered "Red Bug",
    ~ there were a few companies that made similar buckboard automobiles from the start of the XX century through a few decades...
    --- ---
    Could big electric-motor (ex-engine starter) be used for regenerative braking (braking and charging batteries at the same time) - probably YES, as many experts say for amateur-built bicycles (two, three or four wheels) with electric-motor assistance (factory produced, too).
    It seems that brush-type electric-motor would have regenerative braking automatically when you "throttle-back" without cutting electric circle. Then, motor work as a generator producing electric energy charging batteries and use mechanical energy for that - braking vehicle. Not too much of either, but useful.
    Brushless-type electric-motors need a special controller for that?
    --- ---
    Is shown red-yellow Auto Red Bug original or replica?
    Who knows. Such cyclecars (in both variants) are the easiest inspirational vehicles for replications.
    In America, there were a few small companies that produced replicas during the fifties and many amateurs made their own.


    Ciao,
    Zoran
     

    Attached Files:

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  9. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,228

    noboD
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    I talked to my friend that has an electric powered one. He said after Dodge Brothers quit using the starter generator in 1925 is when Auto Red Bug bought the excess and built these cars. His is a '25. They removed the third brush which turned them into a motor. An old advertisement he has claims 17 sustained mph, but does not give a distance. Obviously terrain and speed would effect distance. His actually has three different sprockets to give three speeds. Curious little car. I would not want to drive one on the road which was possible as they had headlights and brake light. Only the right rear wheel was driven. Did anyone recognize the Model T brake drum on the left side?
     
  10. motorcade 1
    Joined: Jun 25, 2010
    Posts: 58

    motorcade 1
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    Don't know if this info is on this thread or not as I havnt read every single post but on youtube search 'festival of slow' for some great videos of cycle car meets in Europe
     
  11. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 789

    SR100
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    We've discussed the Festival of Slowth a couple of times. It looks like a lot of fun.
     
  12. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,918

    banjeaux bob
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    from alaska

  13. fredvv44
    Joined: Dec 11, 2013
    Posts: 419

    fredvv44
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    What a great car!!
     
  14. DEZEL INGEN
    Joined: Jan 5, 2009
    Posts: 20

    DEZEL INGEN
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  15. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,918

    banjeaux bob
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    from alaska

  16. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,918

    banjeaux bob
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    from alaska

  17. fredvv44
    Joined: Dec 11, 2013
    Posts: 419

    fredvv44
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    Those spare wheels spoil the look of an amazing car. Should have made the pockets larger to bring the tire down more.
     
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  18. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 789

    SR100
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    I didn't notice them at first. To me, the windscreen is too vertical. That's what stuck out to me. But now that you point them out, they are all wrong. They are larger than the wheels on the car. I'm pretty sure that they're photoshopped in. Looking behind the closer spare, there's no wheel in the reflection, just the line of the neighboring car. Anyone know what that car is? I'd like to see more of it.
     
  19. Stueeee
    Joined: Oct 21, 2015
    Posts: 220

    Stueeee
    Member
    from Kent, UK

    1926 model Amilcar according to the internet, although that UK registration dates from 1929. Searching on the UU997 UK registration brings up more recent photos on the web, but I can't seem to link to them on here.
     
  20. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 789

    SR100
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    I was asking about the car to the Amilcar's right. The car we've been discussing is actually an Amilcar Italiana. Here are 2014 pics of it:
    [​IMG]
    It looks like it has been modified since the earlier pic, but they didn't fix the awkward side mounts.

    [​IMG]
     
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  21. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 5,918

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    93520854_2634301620172644_4610344949248950272_o.jpg 93577953_2634301393506000_6560599245135544320_o.jpg Rytecraft in Australia along with Diamond T bus!
     
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  22. Stueeee
    Joined: Oct 21, 2015
    Posts: 220

    Stueeee
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    from Kent, UK

    I'll consider myself suitably reprimanded -there's not a lot to go from that photo, but with the Perrot shaft brakes and that radiator stoneguard it could be a Wolseley Hornet Special -most of these were supplied "chassis only" to coachbuilders, so the body shape/style wouldn't be a clue in that case.
     
  23. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 789

    SR100
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    I was thinking Morris Special, but Wolseley Hornet makes more sense.
     
  24. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 789

    SR100
    Member

    upload_2020-4-18_5-31-46.jpeg

    This is said to be a 1957 FMR (aka Messerschmitt) GS. The person who posted a poorly colorized version claimed ir was supposed to have replaced the KR200, but was not pursued. They claim their source was "Von Thyssen’s Lexicon" which I could not find anywhere online.
     
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  25. Rolfzoller
    Joined: Apr 30, 2014
    Posts: 332

    Rolfzoller
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  26. SR100
    Joined: Nov 26, 2013
    Posts: 789

    SR100
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    That book looks interesting. On the publisher's page (in German of course) that you linked is a link to the author's site: www.autolexikon-thyssen.de, which is probably the source for the pic in question. Unfortunately, that site is long gone. I looked it up on Archive.org's Wayback Machine and it disappeared in 2018. The Wayback Machine only archived the front page of the site, so I wasn't able to get any details on the Messerschmitt.
     
  27. Rolfzoller
    Joined: Apr 30, 2014
    Posts: 332

    Rolfzoller
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    Three wheeler with a Panhead engine 93AA5A05-605B-4E8A-A822-F2F412E78385.jpeg from Yacht Club des Avions de la route
     
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  28. fredvv44
    Joined: Dec 11, 2013
    Posts: 419

    fredvv44
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    I wonder how long that engine lasted.
     
  29. Rolfzoller
    Joined: Apr 30, 2014
    Posts: 332

    Rolfzoller
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    In 1974 I had a Panhead,and the Engine was fantastic. 8F44E6F4-3998-4066-ACF4-944C894698AC.jpeg
     
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  30. fredvv44
    Joined: Dec 11, 2013
    Posts: 419

    fredvv44
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    Yes but you didn't have a flywheel , pressure plate and axial thrust applied to it. Most cases of using a Harley engine like this in a car resulted in many broken cranks.
     
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