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Let's Talk Cyclecars

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Bigcheese327, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,197

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    I don't really know. I just post little cars. Some folks don't think Austin 7s qualify as a cyclecar...and others don't like Brescias. I just like little cars that migh qualify as a cyclecar.then those post wa economy vehicles from Europe....
     
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  2. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,197

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    13716200_1056925157719461_8631469773870731748_n.jpg BSA at Brooklands ,the timer is Fernhough.Looks like 4wd
     
  3. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,197

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    0001-LF09_r121_02.jpg 0002-LF09_r121_03.jpg 0008-LF09_r121_09.jpg 0011-LF09_r121_12.jpg 1913 AC Sociable Runabout
     
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  4. rmcroadster
    Joined: Sep 28, 2014
    Posts: 26

    rmcroadster
    Member

    300 kg's is pretty light. An Austin Seven tourer is over 400kg curb weight and the typical sedan is about 630kg with the Big 7 over 700kg. An Amilcar CC starts about the lightest they made at about 450kg and the more common slightly larger C4 is 580kg. A Model T by comparison is about 545kg for a early car up to over 680kg for an all steel body but they were known for good materials that allowed better design. Very interesting, as some little cars are heavier than they look.
    Matthew
     

  5. Lot of technology in that one. Would find the details interesting, methinks.
     
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  6. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 649

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    Hello Matthew,
    Here is definition from Wikipedia:
    “On 14 December 1912, at a meeting of the Federation Internationale des Clubs Moto Cycliste, it was formally decided that there should be an international classification of cyclecars to be accepted by the United Kingdom, Canada, United States, France, The Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, Austria and Germany. It was also decided to establish two classes of cyclecars, as follows;
    • (i) Large class
      • Max. weight: 350 kg (772 lb)
      • Max. engine capacity: 1,100 cc (67 cu in)
      • Min. tyre section: 60 mm (2.4 in)
    • (ii) Small class
      • Min. weight: 150 kg (331 lb)
      • Max. weight: 300 kg (661 lb)
      • Max. engine capacity: 750 cc (46 cu in)
      • Min. tyre section: 55 mm (2.2 in)
    All cycle-cars were to have clutches and change-speed gears. This requirement could be fulfilled by even the simplest devices such as provision for slipping the belt on the pulley to act as a clutch, and varying of the pulley diameter to change the gear ratio.”​
    Such classification was mostly made for fiscal reasons of countries (less taxes for cycle-cars, maybe even simpler driving licenses), but also for international racing... However, for this forum all that isn't of big importance, at least that is my humble and personal opinion. If it looks as cycle-car – then it is cycle-car! Meaning: cycle-cars are merge of motorcycles and automobiles, in construction and prices. Most of manufacturers started as manufacturers of motorcycles and later return to them as the main product after collapse of cycle-car movement...
    Some small cars (voiturettes, baby-cars), from before or after The Great War (WW1) were cheaper, or lighter or slower then some of cycle-cars, but was real cars in miniature, having water-cooled 2 or 4 cylinder engines, “normal” gearboxes, propeller shafts, differentials, good brakes, normal bodies... Famous Salmson and Amilcar, followed by many French automobiles in 1100cc class, were started as cycle-cars, but soon became serious and successful sporting automobiles. That was one of the most beautiful, most practical and most successful class – the best balance good for any use: town and country cruising, touring, sport rides and races, even promenade show-off...
    However, more important than technical characteristics (limits) is the spirit of cycle-cars, their owners and that world-wide movement! British enthusiasts called such movement “New Motoring”! Even after collapse of it, they kept the spirit from twenties up today, trough many variants of British specials, used for all kinds of competition on asphalt or off-road...
    Just to say: almost after start, british magazines "The Cyclecars" and "The Light Cars" merge in to one, covering both sides of the same coin... That was practical motoring for masses, but with nice spirit and often great fun!
    [​IMG]

    A few members from this Forum, made modern versions of sporting cycle-cars, or are in process of building them: joy for them and for us!

    Ciao,
    Zoran
     

    Attached Files:

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  7. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,197

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

  8. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,197

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    13718597_1051951721556869_2092341229120790172_n.jpg 1909 Gregorie 80/4
     
  9. The English made 4WD in early speed cars (midgets) before they were banned.. Were called Skirrows... They were banned as they would climb up and over everything that they came in contact with and in those heady days of speedway before the war, things were quite dangerous enough..
     
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  10. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 649

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    ==================================
    Hello,
    Interesting infortmation - never knew for Brittish 4-wheel-drive specials!

    It seems that they were used a lot in Australia, even in USA?
    Some more information on this web-site:
    http://www.bsafwdc.co.uk/page21.php

    Ciao,
    Zoran
     

    Attached Files:

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  11. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 919

    Kume
    Member

  12. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 919

    Kume
    Member

  13. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,197

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

  14. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,197

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

  15. rmcroadster
    Joined: Sep 28, 2014
    Posts: 26

    rmcroadster
    Member

    Thanks for the info Zoran. Never thought of looking on wikipedia.
    Matthew vccq 65 Concours Sherwood 9.jpg
    An air-cooled flat twin Rover 8 a friend of the family owned.
     
  16. renauric
    Joined: Jul 22, 2016
    Posts: 3

    renauric
    Member

    Hi guys,
    I'm new here. This Sandford I just restored is in the family since 1932, bought then by my 22 years old father as his first car:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I discovered this place through the "Amicale Tricyclecariste de France" site.
    Plenty of beautiful photos here, some I knew already, some I did'nt.
    Cheers,
    Renaud
     
  17. Lots of good info, but the machine in the bottom pic doesn't have much in common with the other stuff.
    It's a whole 'nuther kind of animal.
     

    Attached Files:

  18. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 649

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    Hello Renaud,
    Beautiful car and nice family story!
    Great herritage jewel - enjoy in ride!

    Ciao,
    Zoran
     
  19. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 649

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    ==========================
    John,
    Probably it is - you should know that better as in centre of British specials movement!
    But, what it is on that photo? Any further information, photo maybe?
    It looks to me that it could have similar four-wheels-drive, using BSA components as Scirrow, but photo is not much clear and I never see anything like that...

    Regards,
    Zoran
     
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  20. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,197

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Welcome to the Jalopy Journal Renaud! Thank you for posting your Sandford! Yes,most of the images are borrowed from other places that you frequent and people you know!
     
  21. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,197

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

  22. renauric
    Joined: Jul 22, 2016
    Posts: 3

    renauric
    Member

    ... but not all!
    Thanks, and BTW this is my father and the Sandford in the avatar.
     
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  23. All I can say with certainty is that it is a "Dorcas", of Gordon and Donald Glegg.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 22, 2016
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  24. 01.jpg 02.jpg

    EDIT: The above is from the book "The BSA Front Wheel Drive Cars" by Graham Skillen
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2016
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  25. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 649

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    John,
    Thank you on further information about interesting BSA-based specials!
    Mystery - for me is solved...

    My Internet friend from New Zealand should be especially delighted, coming soon to live in UK and thinking about building some kind of replica of classic British specials...

    Regards,
    Zoran
     
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  26. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,892

    noboD
    Member

    Welcome Renauric, you are very lucky to have a family owned car that is owned that long.
     
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  27. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 919

    Kume
    Member

    Bond. Wellington NZ 1950

    Bond.jpe
     
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  28. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 919

    Kume
    Member

    thumbnail.jpg

    NZ 1913 Alldays & Onions Midget - Light Car.
     
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  29. renauric
    Joined: Jul 22, 2016
    Posts: 3

    renauric
    Member

    Don't I know it! I restored it during the last two years with that in mind. A very good incentive indeed knowing there's about two dozens left now of probably around 200 or so built in the 20's & 30's.
    My father was very fond of that cyclecar which was his only car before WWII. He commuted frequently with my mother from Paris to Brittany (400 miles) driving it fiercely as it is able to do around 70 mph; not bad in the 30's!
    In 1940 he dismantled it in order to save if from requisition by the german army which would take everything with wheels.
    We restored it already in 1969 and raced it in 69/70 at the Autodrome de Montlhéry near Paris for the "Coupes de l'Age d'Or". He was proud that I won the three-wheelers race with it in 70.
    Very sadly the car was robbed in our workshop in 1989 and only reappeared in november 2014 300 miles away. I jumped in my car with a trailer and brought it home. I began dismantling it the next day and I was in it's restoration since. Photos above were taken last week. First running since the 70's.
     

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