Register now to get rid of these ads!

Let's Talk Cyclecars

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Bigcheese327, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. marioD
    Joined: Nov 20, 2005
    Posts: 231

    marioD
    Member

    senechal_1.jpg senechal_2.jpg mathis.jpg violet.jpg donnow_1.jpg donnow_2.jpg
    here's some more...
    Senechal - Mathis - Sima Violet - the one with the side mounted engine i forgot what it was ...

    Mario
     
  2. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 890

    Kume
    Member

    some more details of the Humberette humberette plan.jpg humberette power plant.jpg
     
    motoklas and brayton engine guy like this.
  3. Kume
    Joined: Jan 23, 2010
    Posts: 890

    Kume
    Member

    Premier Chassis with solid mounted rear axle. premier cycle car chassis.jpg
     
    motoklas and brayton engine guy like this.
  4. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Mario,I think the car with the side mounted engine is Frank Seger's SCHASCHE.
     
  5. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Via LeCycylecaristeBelge... 10526033_718912268145089_4189456739584024846_n.jpg
     
  6. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Via LeC 14179_718892984813684_3961648252726337013_n.jpg 10606159_408469715957794_1351299928695127582_n.jpg yclecristeBelge
     
    brayton engine guy likes this.
  7. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    leCyclecariste Belge 12495_10152584070322305_8728421269343678515_n.jpg 10526075_10152584070177305_4237144563796191248_n.jpg 10494589_10152584070052305_4415960674450553156_n.jpg 10570472_10152584069867305_5683608376169305600_n.jpg
     
    brayton engine guy likes this.
  8. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    The picture of the brass tags is from Denis C. video found by Marc.
    10494625_10152585003472305_3530888250961211207_n.jpg
     
  9. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

  10. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Schasche 72315_702292569804186_1959679961_n.jpg
    580293_702291243137652_1404378384_n.jpg 601639_702292169804226_698369638_n.jpg 935114_719799804720129_1285793081_n.jpg 996679_702290713137705_778961390_n.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    brayton engine guy likes this.
  11. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 640

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    Hello Ned,

    Those years I can forget more in one week then could learn in a month during "good old days" (generally, before computers)... However, I remember well that I saw many photos, sketches and diagrams about those two systems well-known for any fan of veteran or vintage automobiles...
    But, now I couldn't find any good visual fact about those two systems on Internet! Probably that I saw all that in many books and magazines that I had? For central gas-pedal shouldn't be problems (still used a lot in vintage era and sometimes later), but off-side gear-change lever system was sometimes different. It couldn't be simple as ordinary remote control for central positioned stick? For early automobile gear-boxes in a style that were used for motorcycle (and still are usual for them) – commands could be simple? Just forward-backward movement of vertical off-side stick with axle/lever to gear-box, similar to motorcycle's pedal... But, when gear-boxes became “modern” with “H” shifting – things became complicated! Maybe, two axles/levers to gear-box?
    I found only some unclear photos of veteran cars chassis, but not very useful for this issue. Also, attached are a few photos with Bugatti system...
    Maybe something could be found later, lost somewhere in my computer archive?

    Ciao, Zoran
    Bugatti, gerachange (1).jpg Bugatti, gerachange (2).jpg Bugatti, gerachange (3).jpg Bugatti, gerachange (4).jpg veteran cars-chassis (1).jpg veteran cars-chassis (2).jpg veteran cars-chassis (3).jpg veteran cars-chassis (4).jpg veteran cars-chassis (5).jpg veteran cars-chassis (6).jpg
     
  12. Ned Ludd
    Joined: May 15, 2009
    Posts: 4,225

    Ned Ludd
    Member

    Thanks Zoran!
     
  13. ebtm3
    Joined: May 23, 2007
    Posts: 837

    ebtm3
    Member

    Note that in the Bugatti the rear is driven by the countershaft in the transmission. A far better system IMHO. because it keeps the cluster turning during a shift. Indian motorcycles used this system also, although that isn't much of a recommendation. I wonder why more manufacturers of cars, particularly sport and racing cars, didn't adopt this--perhaps they did. Makes for quicker shifts, with a crash box. Thinking about it, I seem to remember that an old air cooled Fiat 500 used this too--but again, not a good example to recommend the system Hardly!
     
  14. Ned Ludd
    Joined: May 15, 2009
    Posts: 4,225

    Ned Ludd
    Member

    I'm inclined to agree with you. The only downside is the absence of a (possibly very efficient) direct-drive top gear. These days direct-drive is often the second- or third-highest, so that benefit appears to be moot.

    Coming back about an hour later and taking a closer look at the Bugatti 'box I think I misunderstood what you were saying. The engagement is on the input rather than the output? i.e. the opposite of the conventional arrangement. The difference is that the torque multiplication on the output shaft gear varies with the engaged ratio, though how much of a difference that would make in practice is hard to say. I'll have to think a bit.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2014
  15. LeeStohr
    Joined: Oct 21, 2009
    Posts: 108

    LeeStohr
    Member
    from Virginia

    Another photo of the Enfield Allday car shown at the 1919 Olympia Auto Show on Stand 77 and perhaps the Scottish Motor Show Jan 23-31, 1920. The car had a 5 cylinder radial engine with flywheel fan. The supposed benefits were space saving and excellent engine balance.
    Notice the pressed steel Wobbly web wheels, 30 years ahead of Lotus.
    Cosmos Engineering was also at the same 1919 Olympia Auto Show (Stand 20) with a 3 cylinder radial engine light car, using the same or very similar wobbly web wheels.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  16. LeeStohr
    Joined: Oct 21, 2009
    Posts: 108

    LeeStohr
    Member
    from Virginia

    more photos of the Enfield Allday light car -

    [​IMG]
     
    banjeaux bob likes this.
  17. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Curtis V8 M.T. pic... 10612890_10152657937479306_2904718525685372806_n.jpg
     
  18. LeeStohr
    Joined: Oct 21, 2009
    Posts: 108

    LeeStohr
    Member
    from Virginia

    Largely unknown 1910 Christie V8 -
    [​IMG]
     
    motoklas and banjeaux bob like this.
  19. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Via LeCyclecaristeBelge 10592643_409811665823599_8884246842627316111_n.jpg
     
  20. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

  21. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Alfred Feger's Kleinstrennwagen.Photos by Heinz-Ulrich Wieselmann,1949 image-fotoshowImage-3a827992-241772.jpg image-fotoshowImage-b7c0342a-241739.jpg
     
  22. noodles
    Joined: Apr 26, 2006
    Posts: 15

    noodles
    Member
    from New York

    here is the other sweetheart ..a 1967 Velorex that is now on loan to the Motorcyclepedia Museum in Newburgh New York.. this is a hoot to drive but at this point needs some help.. Velorex pics for book 002.jpg Velorex pics for book 005.jpg
     
    brayton engine guy likes this.
  23. Ned Ludd
    Joined: May 15, 2009
    Posts: 4,225

    Ned Ludd
    Member

    That's an interesting example of early-? mid-? 20th-century organic architecture in the background. It's hard to date because it is usually designed with a healthy disregard, if not actual contempt, for "the discourse on architecture" and all the bullshit that is increasingly associated with it. I love this sort of stuff. Have you got any more information?
     
  24. marioD
    Joined: Nov 20, 2005
    Posts: 231

    marioD
    Member

    Thank you Bob!
    It was indeed quick! The event where the pictures were taken has a small circuit and most of the cars and bikes on display have a chance to race. I rode with a friend in his 1939 Railton. Great fun!
     
    banjeaux bob likes this.
  25. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    Mario,need more pictures of the schasche?
     
  26. marioD
    Joined: Nov 20, 2005
    Posts: 231

    marioD
    Member

    Oh yes please! I liked that little thing - especially when running with the open valvetrain.....
     
  27. motoklas
    Joined: Dec 17, 2010
    Posts: 640

    motoklas
    Member
    from Bern, CH

    LeeStohr, Tuesday at 2:38 AM:
    Another photo of the Enfield Allday car shown at the 1919 Olympia Auto Show on Stand 77 and perhaps the Scottish Motor Show Jan 23-31, 1920. The car had a 5 cylinder radial engine with flywheel fan. The supposed benefits were space saving and excellent engine balance.
    Notice the pressed steel Wobbly web wheels, 30 years ahead of Lotus.
    Cosmos Engineering was also at the same 1919 Olympia Auto Show (Stand 20) with a 3 cylinder radial engine light car, using the same or very similar wobbly web wheels.

    --- --- Im1919EnV128-p573a.jpg
    Hello Lee,
    Thank you on excellent photos of unorthodox automobiles! Both of them had interesting chassis and suspension, beside radial engines. Am I wrong or COSMOS had in-board coil-springs at rear? If so, nothing new in motoring world...
    Ciao, Zoran
     
  28. Ned Ludd
    Joined: May 15, 2009
    Posts: 4,225

    Ned Ludd
    Member

    Well spotted, Zoran!

    It suggests a bolt-in alternative for early-Ford buggy springs.
     
  29. banjeaux bob
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 6,036

    banjeaux bob
    Member
    from alaska

    10570408_819751908057835_437275419654794188_n.jpg Here is an image by Stefan Marjoram showing the V8 JAP of Mr. Scaldwell enroute from England to France and back again.Further illustrating that the car is no trailer queen!
     
    brayton engine guy likes this.
  30. LeeStohr
    Joined: Oct 21, 2009
    Posts: 108

    LeeStohr
    Member
    from Virginia

    Zoran,
    You are correct, it is amazing to see the advanced ideas conceived long ago. The Cosmo was designed by the brilliant English engineer Roy Fedden. However, the suspension was not his - see Motorsport magazine, April 1991 - "The simple frame had only three cross-members, the tubular one in the centre, forming 'A kind of keystone for the whole car', apart from the weightsaving achieved. Fedden was content to use the patented Adams (AFS) system of springing, found otherwise only on the Douglas light-car, a remarkable layout in which central transverse coil springs were coupled to the axles by long arms and bell-cranks, further arms being needed to locate both axles."
    [​IMG]
     
    motoklas likes this.

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.