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Let's see some sheet metal shaping

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by jhnarial, Sep 16, 2008.

  1. Happydaze
    Joined: Aug 21, 2009
    Posts: 1,055

    Happydaze
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Metal shaping with an added dimension! Wonderful stuff!

    Chris
     
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  2. MP&C
    Joined: Jan 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,341

    MP&C
    Member

    The linear stretch hammer and a heel dolly is used to stretch the flange that will be folded down, then a tipping tool takes the flange down about halfway. Then I needed to get in the thick of things, further stretching and hammering over to a 90* flange.

    IMG_6322.JPG


    IMG_6324.JPG

    Once the flange is folded, the Lennox is used to add the joggle for our wired edge..



    Bottom side....

    IMG_6328.JPG

    IMG_6329.JPG

    Top side...

    IMG_6330.JPG

    IMG_6331.JPG
    Next we'll get the wire ring sized and some epoxy primer in the channel for some rust prevention.
     
  3. oldpl8s
    Joined: Apr 11, 2007
    Posts: 1,399

    oldpl8s
    Member

  4. oldpl8s
    Joined: Apr 11, 2007
    Posts: 1,399

    oldpl8s
    Member

  5. Tim
    Joined: Mar 2, 2001
    Posts: 11,896

    Tim
    Member
    from Raytown Mo

    Just found this thread and am thrilled. That first post about shrinking the bowl into existence was fantastic. I’m looking to get into more metal shaping this year and I think I’ll get a lot of good ideas going threw these pages :)
     
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  6. MP&C
    Joined: Jan 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,341

    MP&C
    Member

    John, he is likely using AKDQ, or a drawing quality steel which is more tolerant of such forming abuse..
     
  7. john worden
    Joined: Nov 14, 2007
    Posts: 1,658

    john worden
    Member
    from iowa

    I don't see it as abuse. It is extreme stretch for any quality metal with resulting extreme thinning.
    If the result is paper thin and doesn't split than so be it.
    In any case the result is excellent.
     
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  8. MP&C
    Joined: Jan 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,341

    MP&C
    Member

    Our wire "ring" was formed using our tubing roller, the tool shown here in the vise when we were bending fuel line a few months back....

    IMG_6367.JPG

    The ring was then sized to fit, ends TIG welded together, filed, and media blasted for paint adhesion. The channel and surrounding area was abraded with some 120 grit and some SPI epoxy brushed into the channel. The wire gets laid into the channel and another brush coat on any bare spots. Then the flange is staked down using the linear stretch hammer to hold the wire in position...

    IMG_6362.JPG

    Then the flange is hammered over as we did previously with our test sample.

    IMG_6364.JPG

    After our initial coat of primer had dried, we brushed around the perimeter to seal the wire and flange.

    IMG_6366.JPG


    Next will be adding our new structural member to the bottom side.
     
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  9. cornfieldcustoms
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 874

    cornfieldcustoms
    Member

    I wouldn't say the result is paper thin by any means. It might be down to .030 or a little thinner. The pockets are deep, but pull from a decent sized area so it wont thin a ton. I have been able to stretch out pockets in 19 gauge about the same size in diameter to about 3-3.5 inches deep with out splitting or becoming to thin. Just think about the amount of draw on a stamped steel fender in 19 gauge that is not paper thin
     
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  10. THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Joined: Jun 6, 2007
    Posts: 3,344

    THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Member
    from FRENCHTOWN

    Or for that matter -
    A stamped oil pan
     
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  11. MP&C
    Joined: Jan 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,341

    MP&C
    Member

    Looking at the bottom side of the hood, all of the structure uses a radius where the parts intersect, so we may as well follow suit.. Holes were cut in some 19 Gauge and corners cut out..


    [​IMG]


    Corners TIG welded and welds dressed..


    [​IMG]


    The area our brace will cover is abraded so we can get it covered with epoxy primer before installing the brace.


    [​IMG]


    Brace is media blasted to prep for epoxy primer, and test fit to the hood.. Once the epoxy sets up a couple days we'll get the brace welded in..


    [​IMG]


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    Here are some older pictures of the car just to show what we're working on...


    [​IMG]


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    [​IMG]
     
  12. THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Joined: Jun 6, 2007
    Posts: 3,344

    THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Member
    from FRENCHTOWN

    You do very professional looking work; lots of attention to detail so the job will LAST.
     
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  13. cornfieldcustoms
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 874

    cornfieldcustoms
    Member

    Here is a link to a short video of the process of making a custom drop air cleaner er base

    and some pics of it installed 49C90289-75B8-4769-9435-7196C151BE14.jpeg 7423A6F2-6D2C-41D3-860C-D0F587AE018A.jpeg
     
  14. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 32,361

    loudbang
    Member

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  15. MP&C
    Joined: Jan 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,341

    MP&C
    Member

    Thanks for the link, quite the surprise!
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2020
  16. MP&C
    Joined: Jan 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,341

    MP&C
    Member

    Prior to welding the brace in, we used some 3M NVH dampening material and added a few dabs on the inner hood skin where the brace's flanges would rest (Thanks to Chris Hamilton for the recommendation).

    [​IMG]


    16 gauge cold rolled steel was used under the brace as a heat block for welding. The brace Is clamped, then tacked in place using the TIG.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    TIG welded in short beads and checked the outside hood skin for heat, let cool and continued in that fashion.


    [​IMG]


    Welds on the flat area of the flanges were dressed smooth. Remaining portion of the weld will likely be covered in a slight amount of filler to mimic the radius elsewhere under the hood.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Video of underside:





    Topside with some epoxy on the bare parts....


    [​IMG]
     
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  17. cornfieldcustoms
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 874

    cornfieldcustoms
    Member

    Nothing to spectacular but whipped up a pair of extended length mode a door skins for a customer 03DC2A18-B235-4ACE-9305-772F47452E1B.jpeg
     

    Attached Files:

  18. MP&C
    Joined: Jan 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,341

    MP&C
    Member

    Nice work Mike! Power hammer first, then beltline bead?
     
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  19. cornfieldcustoms
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 874

    cornfieldcustoms
    Member

    Yea shaped on the hammer then Lennox to do the belt line
     
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  20. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 5,390

    Marty Strode
    Member

    Me and a buddy built an engine cover and a tunnel/console for a mid engine 65 Corvair. Lot's of welding. IMG_4043.JPG IMG_4047.JPG
     
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  21. Marty nice work . All welded ,now the work begins.
     
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  22. cornfieldcustoms
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 874

    cornfieldcustoms
    Member

    Here is another video we just finished up. Doing some extended model a door skins for a customer
     
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  23. 26A35639-C8DB-490A-9736-89F0D614DBAA.jpeg 251341B2-C431-45F8-BA9F-1E59E77D30CE.jpeg 8E64538A-E088-472C-9A70-E29365138428.jpeg 8638FD84-72D5-46B8-B38B-811681AB118D.jpeg 26573BF2-1A15-4DD0-8B29-D4F4235806BA.jpeg 389ECF3E-E426-4238-968F-3D55F8234157.jpeg 8F37579B-232A-4462-8D27-ABBBCF39AD94.jpeg Well with LSR coming up I started working on a hood and sides for the Tudor . Made a template and cut a piece of 3003 .032 h14 and started forming the top by hand and using my pipe bender . A little tweaking in the morning and mount the hinges . Then on to the sides with the exhaust coming through with 5” louvers above the pipes .
     
  24. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 3,628

    Fortunateson
    Member

    Last edited: Feb 19, 2020
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  25. cornfieldcustoms
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 874

    cornfieldcustoms
    Member

    Getting more pieces welded up and hammered out on the 1932 Miller burden pleasure car body 06DF86CE-2840-4104-872A-B2B3045D5876.jpeg 5AD8890E-E0EB-48C5-AD74-68DD50CF3F4F.jpeg A1FCAEC9-2D0A-4007-A92A-57B58004D69D.jpeg F9E356EF-DAB7-43F6-A785-90E5C9410348.jpeg 6569966F-5281-42AC-8524-B6FBC38C3261.jpeg
     
  26. MP&C
    Joined: Jan 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,341

    MP&C
    Member

    Just to round out the story on the Biederman truck we did the rust repairs and metal fabrication on, it found its way onto the cover of the latest issue of Wheels of Time. It has a feature article on the restoration John did on the truck and the back story on why he chose to restore it, as well as a follow up article on the company history. Pretty neat to read, honored to have played a small part in helping preserve an example of this rare truck for future generations.

    [​IMG]

    Before:

    [​IMG]

    After:

    [​IMG]


    Funny, at one point (think we were working on fenders at the time) I asked John what he was thinking in buying a truck that needed so much rust repair with no parts (trucks) to be found anywhere. He just shrugged his shoulders and said, here we are. It was a nice challenge to help save this truck that future generations might see this part of the history of Biederman Trucks. I would guess this is going in a truck/transportation museum somewhere before it's all said and done.


    Photo credit: ATHS Wheels of Time
     
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  27. MP&C
    Joined: Jan 11, 2008
    Posts: 2,341

    MP&C
    Member

    Some basic stuff in replacing previous patches with better patches, trimming and tacking. Hopefully this will help out someone with patch panels.


    The owner of the Biederman truck we had done all those rust repairs and fabrications on also has a 51 Ford F7 with a Rollback body. He was driving it down the road a few months back when the Delco Remy voltage regulator on the firewall malfunctioned and resulted in an electrical fire. The heat caused some of the filler on the outside of the hood above the fire to delaminate, showing up as circles in the paint. As we sanded these defects out it was noticed that an abundance of filler (+1/4") had been used. The more we looked, the more filler we found all over the hood. In an effort to yield some weight savings, the entire outside of the hood was stripped..

    [​IMG]


    In order to have free access for planishing out the Atlantic Ocean defects, the hood brace was removed from the inside...


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    This revealed more defects that the last shop saw as fixes, but they won't leave my shop like that....
    Rather than butt weld in the proper thickness metal, a piece of about 16 gauge is slipped behind the rust hole area (from dirt accumulating between brace and hood skin) and MIG welded around the perimeter. I think we can improve on that..


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    In addition to that, the brace had lost it's structural integrity, so we will remake the ends..


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    To start our repairs, a body sweep is used to capture the lower flange profile. Note that a profile cut out of construction paper/cardboard works as well.


    [​IMG]


    Verifying the panel thickness. Despite this being an early 50's truck, despite this being a BIG truck, yes, the outer sheet metal here is STILL only 19 gauge.


    [​IMG]


    The affected area was cut out using an air body saw, use what you have available. Note we have no corners in the cut to help improve consistency in weld shrinkage on either side.


    [​IMG]


    The flange bend line is traced from our profile template/body sweep, and bent using tipping wheel on the bead roller (since it's not a straight bend). Here test fitted to the hood..


    [​IMG]


    An Ice Pick (something everyone should have if doing this type of work) is used to mark the area of the cut and more importantly, the cuts for the flanges.


    [​IMG]


    Next we trim the panel on the band saw leaving 1/4" extra around our marks. Next, we use offset snips and trim the flanges to the lines scribed. And ONLY the flanges.. Then the panel is re-fitted with the flanges flush with the original, and RE-scribe the round line, this time with more force to see the mark better.

    Note the scribe line has moved closer toward the flange as we located the panel correctly with flanges flush..


    [​IMG]


    Fitted... panel should be as tight as you can get it to minimize any shrinking/pulling.


    [​IMG]


    Flanges and outer surface are both aligned to the original first and I use TIG to tack on the exact corner on both ends to maintain this alignment.. Side note.... tacking only one end and working around to the other may shrink as you go, pulling other end down where it no longer aligns. So in this case, align both ends, tack both ends, and then progressively work your tacks side to side toward the bottom of the circle.


    [​IMG]


    Note here the flange was left long on our replacement. Trying to weld it in place already trimmed to fit will invariably cause the edge to burn back, making it more difficult to weld this seam all the way to the edge. Leaving the flange on our patch long makes the outer part serve as a heat sink where this burn back effect is less of an issue. Once the welds are dressed, trim the excess using offset snips..


    [​IMG]
     
  28. THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Joined: Jun 6, 2007
    Posts: 3,344

    THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
    Member
    from FRENCHTOWN

    I like your game plan . And work ethic. When I see cobbled repairs like you found I just shake my head and wonder how those hacks justify such shoddy work. You did good stripping away the Bondo. After that fire I would not trust it to hold up even out of the heat affected zone.
     
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  29. realsteeler
    Joined: Mar 30, 2012
    Posts: 38

    realsteeler
    Member

    Been messing around with this. It's an air box/filter housing to channel cold air from behind the grille, thru the inner fender, to 235 turbo propane 46 Chevy 1/2 ton pickup
     

    Attached Files:

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  30. chrisp
    Joined: Jan 27, 2007
    Posts: 849

    chrisp
    Member

    I know a guy who has a "restoration shop" who works like that. He doesn't understand why I buttweld, to him the hole is the problem, so once he is done the problem is solved.
     
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