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Leaf spring tech

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by xmlc216x, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. xmlc216x
    Joined: Oct 5, 2007
    Posts: 488

    xmlc216x
    Member
    from MS

    Been thinking about different ways to static drop my '52 fleetline and I'm still tossing around ideas with the leaf springs. So today I come to ask the members of the HAMB what they think about an idea...

    What if you disassemble the leaf spring and flipped each spring upside down and put them back together.... then relocate the leaf springs inside the frame rails so they have clearance to flex upwards.

    My theory is that by flipping each spring it is acting in the same way except the spring's overall length would decrease as it flexes instead of getting longer as it would have before. The only problem I can forsee would be that the springs might try to "dig in" to each other since they are flipped. I think this could be solved by filing the ends smooth.

    Thoughts?

    I'll see if I can sketch something up to make it more clear...
     
  2. xmlc216x
    Joined: Oct 5, 2007
    Posts: 488

    xmlc216x
    Member
    from MS

    Here's what I'm thinking
     

    Attached Files:

  3. springer
    Joined: Jul 10, 2003
    Posts: 352

    springer
    Member

    the best way to do it and still use the stock springs would be to just remove a few leaves. If that if still to high then you could take it to a spring shop and have them lower the arch. Just remember that once they lower it the arch can not be brought back up. Spring steel has a memory for arch. It will always fall back down to it's lowest arch eventually.
     
  4. von Dyck
    Joined: Apr 12, 2007
    Posts: 678

    von Dyck
    Member

    Your individual leaves are designed to rub against each other causing friction to dampen natural frequency oscillations. What you have proposed will have the leaves pulling away from each other and losing the dampening effect. It would also put all the strain on the rebound clips that are designed only to keep the leaves in alignment and in contact with each other. The next problem is frame-to-axle housing clearance.
    As springer suggested, de-arch the spring. I would add that you could also reverse the eyes on the main leaf for a little more drop. FWIW the mid- 60s Mopars rear springs sat flat at factory ride height - they had no arch and had a decent ride.
     

  5. xmlc216x
    Joined: Oct 5, 2007
    Posts: 488

    xmlc216x
    Member
    from MS

    The stock springs are pretty small to begin with, I do not want to run less of them. I can de-arch them myself, but I was thinking about trying something new instead...

    If you look closer at my diagram and description I said I would re-stack the springs. I would not simply flip the spring over and re-mount it. Therefore, the individual leaves will still rub against each other and still have the dampening effect. I would also chamfer the ends of each spring to ensure that they do not dig into each other. As far as frame/axle clearance, I will be notching the frame for clearance.
     
  6. newsomtravis
    Joined: Jun 1, 2009
    Posts: 562

    newsomtravis
    Member
    from pville, ca

    if you can re-arch the springs yourself, what is the purpose of the flipping thing? i don`t understand....
     
  7. pug man
    Joined: Apr 9, 2007
    Posts: 1,010

    pug man
    Member
    from louisiana

    I think i would go a different route, it is not "DESIGNED" to be put upside down....
     
  8. xmlc216x
    Joined: Oct 5, 2007
    Posts: 488

    xmlc216x
    Member
    from MS

    Same concept as de-arching the main leaf and flipping the eyes with even more drop. It would keep you from needing to remove springs or use blocks. Then you don't have to worry about scrub line either.
     
  9. newsomtravis
    Joined: Jun 1, 2009
    Posts: 562

    newsomtravis
    Member
    from pville, ca

    typo, i meant de arch....still don`t get it i guess......not bagging on ya.....
     
  10. badshifter
    Joined: Apr 28, 2006
    Posts: 3,344

    badshifter
    Member

    Google search underslung chassis, or search on here underslung. Loads of history on it, and it looks cool!
     
  11. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 8,838

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    Remove a leaf or two and/or reverse the rear eye from under to over the spring, provided there is clearance with shackles and chassis? May only be 1 1/2" - 2". is this sufficient?
     
  12. Junkytudor
    Joined: Jan 15, 2007
    Posts: 18

    Junkytudor
    Member

    You can buy a cheap harbor freight pipe bender and de-arch the springs yourself
    You can reverse the longest leaf at the same time and get about 2 to 3
    Inches of drop on the cheap.
     
  13. JimV57
    Joined: Feb 15, 2011
    Posts: 230

    JimV57
    Member
    from California

    why not just use lowering blocks?
     
  14. newsomtravis
    Joined: Jun 1, 2009
    Posts: 562

    newsomtravis
    Member
    from pville, ca

    hey junky? harbor freight pipe bender to de arch springs? really? working on lowering an old dodge truck and took out some leafs, but still not low enough, have one of those benders, last time i tried to reach a spring in my press it snapped.....got any tips or tricks, sorry to hijack....but need help too....also goes to the op`er
     
  15. xmlc216x
    Joined: Oct 5, 2007
    Posts: 488

    xmlc216x
    Member
    from MS

    Because I would need 4" blocks and completely de-arched springs to even come close to getting it low enough.
     
  16. xmlc216x
    Joined: Oct 5, 2007
    Posts: 488

    xmlc216x
    Member
    from MS

  17. storm king
    Joined: Oct 16, 2007
    Posts: 1,991

    storm king
    Member

    I've spent several years, off and on, lowering my '86 Dodge truck. I don't like bags, and I sure don't like lowering blocks or flipping springs, which, incidently, will not work well at all, and they won't last long when used in the fashion you suggest. (I thought about doing that once, but talked to some leaf spring mfg guys who advised against it).
    I ended up changing the angle of my leaf's, by moving the front spring mounts p higher on my frame, then resetting the pinion angle by installing new spring perches.
    Something tells me that changing the angle of the springs should have some effect on how the springs function, but so far they have been working super.
    I ended up making my own upper control arms, and having a special set of front coil springs made for the truck.
     
  18. This was a friends car. Reverse Eyes/Dearched springs, a few leafs removed, 3" Blocks, Mild Notch, Air Shocks. Rode great.
     

    Attached Files:

  19. RDR
    Joined: May 30, 2009
    Posts: 1,355

    RDR
    Member

    Try it and let us know.....
     

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