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Projects It's as bad as it looks

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by 1/2done, Dec 19, 2009.

  1. ffr1222k
    Joined: Nov 5, 2009
    Posts: 1,094

    ffr1222k
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I like # 2 the best.

    It is a hard decision though, # 3 looks good too.
     
  2. damnfingers
    Joined: Sep 22, 2006
    Posts: 1,287

    damnfingers
    Member

    #3 and stretch the rear window to match.
     
  3. gtolarry
    Joined: Dec 22, 2009
    Posts: 124

    gtolarry
    Member
    from Texas

    just found this thread and it is AWESOME. The only trouble I have with it, is right now I am at work and i can't quit reading :) Keep up the excellent
    work
     
  4. jerseyboy
    Joined: Jul 17, 2006
    Posts: 634

    jerseyboy
    Member

    Beautiful work! I like #3.:D
     
  5. MGene
    Joined: Mar 25, 2012
    Posts: 28

    MGene
    Member
    from iv cal

    which top is going to look better with the body sectioned?
     
  6. zibo
    Joined: Mar 17, 2002
    Posts: 2,346

    zibo
    Member
    from dago ca

    I was wondering why my mailbox was full!
    Just kidding.
    It's about time to do some of the fun work.
    It does make it easier when the car is actually straight though!
    Funny how we took exactly opposite paths.

    Looks like you've got your hands full with the chop!
    You method shows why alot of guys filled the raingutter seam,
    since its not only a reveal line but an actual sandwich of metal.
    Its really tough to realign that curve,
    but you are the perfect person to do it.
    At least you have one side to practice with!

    Anyway I'm late to the game but I'll be watching now!
    Kinda going with #2 as I like the 40 curves just reduced.

    Chop Chop!

    TP
     
  7. 1/2done
    Joined: Oct 29, 2006
    Posts: 601

    1/2done
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Ohio

    I'm with you, Travis. I like the 40 curves, but on a lower profile.

    I spent some time tonight grinding welds and looking at the rear drip rail seam. I'm thinking about moving the rear section of the seam forward to meet the front. I'd cut it at the trim hole line starting at the first hole in front of the deck lid and going up to the front section in length and just high enough to contain the seam.

    IMAG0006.jpg

    The other more ambitious route would be to move the whole rear section forward and extend the trunk lid 4". This option intrigues me most.

    IMG00080-20121111-1036.jpg

    If I feel like I'm going to have to fill the drip rail I'll definitely go with option #3 and round the door corner like the Rice coupe and possibly channel it the same way.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
  8. Rhys
    Joined: Oct 23, 2012
    Posts: 4

    Rhys
    Member
    from Oakdale CA

    I agree with fridge, we have worked on a a few cars that were damaged in fires, the metal actually is kinda soft not brittle so a bit hard to keep its shape, more like AK steel?? which is what we sue to make fenders,hoods etc. I would wash the car down again with a pressure washer, let it dry well then sandblast the whole deal, and get in acid etched prime same day if possible, most of the dents I see on it are probably caused by the crap that fell on it from the roof of structure, not heat, so most work will be shrinking, This is a bit more burned than I have ever done, but I definatly think you can bring it back, if you don't mind lots of hand time, I often tell folks by our shop when they wonder how we restored one of the cars, how you tackle something like that, I tell um its like eating an elephant, just work on it one bite at a time..........
     
  9. Rhys
    Joined: Oct 23, 2012
    Posts: 4

    Rhys
    Member
    from Oakdale CA

    sheeze ok Ill get the hang of this.lol I see I was not at the end of the thread, sorry folks.......
     
  10. 1/2done
    Joined: Oct 29, 2006
    Posts: 601

    1/2done
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Ohio

    No worries! :D
     
  11. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,182

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    What ever you choose I hope you can keep the drip rail. It is a rolled metal pin stripe.
     
  12. zibo
    Joined: Mar 17, 2002
    Posts: 2,346

    zibo
    Member
    from dago ca

    That's was the solution to my 40 chop.
    The Hudson chop also did it this way and some others.
    My chop was about 3.75",
    but the windshield was angled back,
    so that rear portion was only scooted up about 3".

    [​IMG]

    I think that way is the least ambitious route!
    It is the most mathematical,
    by measuring where the gap ends had the same shape.
    There was almost no changing of any of the Ford curves,
    everything kinda matched up with limited relief cuts.
    The tricky part will be matching the decklid line.
    Since mine was sectioned I matched the decklid to the new position,
    then filled the gaps.

    The problem is the 40 hump stays.
    Alot of guys want a softer flow,
    so the slice and dice way is used more.
    It will be interesting to watch you integrate both versions.

    It is going to be tough to get that drip rail to line up,
    but I think it will be worth the effort either way you slice it up.
    TP
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012
  13. koolkemp
    Joined: May 7, 2004
    Posts: 6,007

    koolkemp
    Member

    I too would say #3
     
  14. paco
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 1,139

    paco
    Member
    from Atlanta

    #2 is looking good but perhaps a scouch more than the actual #2 but not as much as the #2 ... ya, ya ... sure, sure ...

    Either way - looking good. You've got some mad skills going on.
     
  15. 1/2done
    Joined: Oct 29, 2006
    Posts: 601

    1/2done
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Ohio

    Well I did a lot of studying and measuring, and a little cutting and welding today. I figured out how to keep the drip rail looking somewhat stock and how I'm going to do the rear window.

    IMAG0014.jpg

    IMAG0013.jpg

    The back panel is just clamped in place still until I get the other side cut and welded. It was dark by the time I got to this point so I'll roll it outside tomorrow and get some better shots. I think I'm happy with it, I'll know better when I can see it from a distance.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
  16. Scumdog
    Joined: Mar 3, 2010
    Posts: 616

    Scumdog
    Member

    Jumpin jilikers!

    Certainly make MY coupe look pretty good...and I thought IT was rough!
     
  17. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,182

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    That looks great. Looking forward to more pictures.
     
  18. 1/2done
    Joined: Oct 29, 2006
    Posts: 601

    1/2done
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Ohio

    I got the other side cut and welded today and rolled it out for a few shots.

    IMAG0024.jpg

    IMAG0023.jpg

    IMAG0025.jpg

    IMAG0022.jpg IMAG0021.jpg

    This will be the final roof profile. I ended up splitting the difference between #2 and #3. I like the way it keeps the factory lines without the top hat room.
    I'll start welding the window in this week and get all the filler pieces made. Then I think I'll start on the floor.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
  19. zibo
    Joined: Mar 17, 2002
    Posts: 2,346

    zibo
    Member
    from dago ca

    Looks good!
    That was really the only way to fix that curvy line.
    Lotsa tedious welding and fitting now!
    TP
     
  20. Buzznut
    Joined: May 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,349

    Buzznut
    Member

    You did goo bro! Nice transitions and body lines...
     
  21. Six Ball
    Joined: Oct 8, 2007
    Posts: 3,182

    Six Ball
    Member
    from Nevada

    X 3 You did it!
     
  22. EnragedHawk
    Joined: Jun 17, 2009
    Posts: 1,039

    EnragedHawk
    Member
    from Waco, TX

    Man, this is one of the craziest builds I have seen. Amazing work man!
     
  23. Hemiman51
    Joined: Jun 25, 2012
    Posts: 346

    Hemiman51
    Member

    I would go with #3 as some said it would take the bump out of the roof line. #3 gives the roof line a nice flow. My hat is off to you, the work so far is fantastic. Not one of the easier cars to chop. As you split the diffrence I like it.
     
  24. RichG
    Joined: Dec 8, 2008
    Posts: 3,917

    RichG
    Member

    I stand by this statement, you've done a killer job on this car so far! Very nicely done sir.
     
  25. 1/2done
    Joined: Oct 29, 2006
    Posts: 601

    1/2done
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Ohio

    A while back I was going through a box of welding supplies that was with the TIG welder I got when my friend Ray died. I found a dirty old plastic jar with a rusty metal lid that turned out to be tinning butter. So since I had some 1lb lead sticks I thought I'd give it a shot. I tried lead work back in the 90's on an OT car and it didn't go well, I had lead and a torch but no clue on what I was doing. The only advantage I have now is having seen a few videos and read some articles. That and the tinning butter, I didn't have any last time.

    I just tried a small area where I had welded in a filler section.

    IMAG0033.jpg

    IMAG0035-1.jpg

    What I learned with this little experiment is that I don't want the toxic mess that goes with it in my attached garage. As soon as I was done I opened the garage door and blew the mess outside, came in and put my uniform inside out in the hamper and took a shower. If I go this route, and I think I will, I'll wait till I can do it outside.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
  26. Buzznut
    Joined: May 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,349

    Buzznut
    Member

    Dude, you aren't breathing that stuff are you? You really need to wear some sort of mask that will keep the fumes out of your lungs...that stuff is deadly. I know back in the day they didn't take precautions, but I don't think they knew just how bad it really was.
     
  27. 1/2done
    Joined: Oct 29, 2006
    Posts: 601

    1/2done
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Ohio

    I had on a paint respirator while I was sanding. Yeah, that's why I want to wait for warm weather so I can do this in the driveway.
     
  28. 343w
    Joined: Dec 15, 2008
    Posts: 1,450

    343w
    Member

    I just read through your entire thread, you are a true craftman, and probably one of the most patient builders I've ever witnessed! Keep on that little coupe, I'm signed-on for the duration. My first car was a 40 coupe back in 1962. Thanks for sharing your build with us fellow hambers.
     
  29. Buzznut
    Joined: May 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,349

    Buzznut
    Member

    Truth be told, part of me is just being selfish. I'd kind of like you to stick around long enough so we can see her finished...that, and I hate to see anyone pushing daisies before their time. :D
     
  30. Diavolo
    Joined: Apr 1, 2009
    Posts: 808

    Diavolo
    Member

    Pfft. Bill Hines is as old as dirt and has lead flowing thru his veins! Nah, seriously, take care and use precautions. Just cause Bill is immune doesn't mean we are. He does mighty fine lead work though...
     

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