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Is Glyptal Engine Paint Worth the Bother

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 57chevywagonman, Nov 15, 2011.

  1. nrgwizard
    Joined: Aug 18, 2006
    Posts: 1,041

    nrgwizard
    Member
    from Minn. uSA

    Hey, K9Racer;
    Now I gotta know; Stude mill or not?
    Baking it, why? To set the paint or to carbonize all the old crap in it? Probably need the self-clean cycle. Hope that doesn't warp something.
    & since it's not a good idea to paint the inside of the cooling system, as that'll retain heat, why or what part of the mill was leaking coolant? Can't tell what is part of the leg-pulling here? Just curious...
    Marcus...
     
  2. captainjunk#2
    Joined: Mar 13, 2008
    Posts: 4,296

    captainjunk#2
    Member

    Glypal was originally developed for G E to coat the insides and winding s of large elelctric motors , engine guys discovered that they could paint the insides of engines to help oil return to the pan and it helped seal the cases on old motorcycles , as the early aluminum castings tended to be porous and would drool beads of oil right through the cases , why you would need to paint a modern engine i wouldnt know , problem with doing this also if the preperation isnt perfect you now have dry flakes of glytal in your oil and pick up screen ,
     
  3. deathrowdave
    Joined: May 27, 2014
    Posts: 1,438

    deathrowdave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from NKy

    I have used Glyptal in many builds . Never one issue , clean , clean surface prep is of a must . I used heat lamps to cure my stuff . I rebuild a trans I did 20 years ago last fall . Once I cleaned it , the coating looked as it was installed . I used correct thinner also , I like to use what is recommended by the product manufacture . All is well for me and I would do it over again in a minute .


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
    Irish Mike likes this.
  4. steinauge
    Joined: Feb 28, 2014
    Posts: 1,505

    steinauge
    Member
    from 1960

    Glyptal was used by H.D as late as the mid 70s inside engine cases .Its function was to help seal minor pores in the casting.I always cleaned the case thoroughly then washed it with lacquer thinner and warmed the casting to around 120 or so farenheit before coating. I have never had any come off. I dont use it in automotive engines.
     
  5. big duece
    Joined: Jul 28, 2008
    Posts: 5,403

    big duece
    Member
    from kansas

    Anyone have part of a can they want to get rid of?
     
  6. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 3,572

    indyjps
    Member

    Agree. Chance of the paint flaking are not worth it to me. I prepped my first 2 blocks with smooth ground oil galleys, built a whole lot more since. I wont be doin it again.

    It is worth the time to me to go over the entire block and deburr, remove casting flash etc. Cutting my hands up installing a fresh engine is just annoying when I coulda spent an hour cleaning it up.

    I also like adding screens to the drainback holes, if youre not using roller rockers or anything with needles bearings its less of an issue.
     
  7. The37Kid
    Joined: Apr 30, 2004
    Posts: 25,395

    The37Kid
    Member


    WATERGLASS I've got a full can of that, never knew it could be used to coat the inside of an engine. Check the classifieds later today. Bob
     
  8. 19Fordy
    Joined: May 17, 2003
    Posts: 6,183

    19Fordy
    Member

    Glyptal on your flathead is a waste of money.
    Just use a high quality oil and perform regular oil changes.
    Spend your money on something that will make a difference.
     
  9. Trethewey
    Joined: Jan 2, 2017
    Posts: 35

    Trethewey
    Member

    One ultimately important question I've always had: would not a coating on the inside of the crankcase interfere with oil cooling?
    The coating would tend to coagulate and fill in the valleys in the casting, thus decreasing the surface area available for heat absorption and radiation.
    Plus, by the very intent of the coating (speeding oil return), the speeded-up oil would have less time on the casting's surface to transfer heat.
    Eddie
     
  10. don't use it, and never have, figure I could spend my time on better things for HP.............
     

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