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Incredible welds

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by rusty f100, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. paco
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 1,138

    paco
    Member
    from Atlanta

    I wasn't busting on you ... I was just making a observation based on your other work. Nothing wrong with multiple pcs. but it does give it other places to leak. I know you've seen my tanks & I (personally) like as little seamwork as possible. Works for me.

    Yours looks great ... your welding skill is what shows.

    Keep us posted on the bike project progress & you're the man for having another operation right after you recovered from this one!!

    Good luck with that recovery too.

    PACO
     
  2. Good luck... Hope all goes smooth....
     
  3. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Right on! My original idea(Which I think I'll still try sometime) was actually a "patchwork" look. Exposed welds are gonna be a big part of this bike. I practiced my butt welds for a week before doing the tank, wanted to get 100% penetration and welds that looked good! Definitely a challenge for someone who doesn't do this kind of aluminum work with regularity! I definitely appreciate your insight.

    Thanks!

    I feel bad when there's too many posts without pics....here's one I threw up on Instagram earlier(@welderassassin if you're on there), close up of the tank.

    [​IMG]
    Can't wait to get back to this project. #panicattack #weldporn #alooominum #triumph by Brown Dog Welding, on Flickr
     
  4. paco
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 1,138

    paco
    Member
    from Atlanta

    No shame in those weldments!

    I have more people, when doing tanks, that want the larger roll of quarters vs. the smaller dime rows ... maybe it's more "industrial". I don't grind any aluminum tank welds & if it's requested I refuse. I like the patchwork idea. It gives it a more ... fabricated look.

    I just started working a race car fab shop - hopefully they'll get lots of aluminum stuff ... I need to brush up on C/M welding ...
     
  5. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    This one I walked through making a belt buckle. Some pretty cool welding shots here too, watch in HD!

    <iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/oaIehqDGl9M?list=UUTRI9Us8zLiywY29vsW3kKg" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe>

    [​IMG]
    Sucker Punch belt buckle by Brown Dog Welding, on Flickr
     
  6. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,942

    rottenleonard
    Member

    I just picked up a miller diversion 180 and have been trying to get the hang of this, I'm pretty shakey but have finally gotten the knack of not touching my tungston with the filler rod or dipping it in the puddle, and I'm starting to make some decent looking welds.

    One question though, my welds all come out with sort of a dull gray finish rather than being shiny colored welds like is seen on this thread, what needs to change? Is this just cosmetic or is there going to be an issue with the integrity of the weld?
     
  7. 117harv
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 6,592

    117harv
    Member

    ^^^ Too much heat, also good gas coverage makes for better looking welds, rainbow color on steel and stainless.
     
  8. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 6,967

    noboD
    Member

    BTW Jdustu, how's rehab going?
     
  9. rottenleonard
    Joined: Nov 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,942

    rottenleonard
    Member

    So basicaly I need to turn down the heat and just allow a lot more time to form the puddle and move it?

    This setup came with just a pressure regulator and no real flow gauge I started with it around 25 psi and then tryed 20, 15, and 10 I deally didn't notice much difference. is there a good rule of thumb for where to set it?
     
  10. 117harv
    Joined: Nov 12, 2009
    Posts: 6,592

    117harv
    Member

    Let first state, I am NO expert welder. Getting the cup as close to the weld or tungsten sticking out to a minimum as possible, and or a gas lense helps to get more/better gas coverage. I have mine set at 15, more when I have to stick the tungsten out to reach into a tight spot to get full coverage, I turn it up. Also clean metal makes for a better looking as well as structural weld, although I have/do weld on less than clean metal at times.

    I dont set the amps for what i'm welding on, I have the setting high and just push the pedal down to the amps required, others do it different.
     
  11. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Not so great.

    Set the pressure just high enough to get coverage. Adding more pressure is just gonna cause more turbulence and waste gas. One of the reasons I often use a gas lens, it smooths out gas flow and lets me use lower pressure, thus saving gas too.

    Like was already mentioned, chances are you were running too hot....which pry means you're running to slow. So don't necessarily turn the heat down, just regulate the heat input with speed.
     
  12. paco
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 1,138

    paco
    Member
    from Atlanta

    Hey Justin - sorry to hear of the trouble on the rehab. That's gotta suc.

    I have a Q in a miller mig welder. I don't use it often but when I do I need it to perform well. Whats been going on is the wire sputters out of the torch at lower gas pressure. WHen I turn it up (to 30 lbs.) it clears & welds fine. Never had another machine do this. It's a millermatic challenger 175. It's not that old & I don't have anyone use my weld equip. I had the gauge recently rebuilt as it was leaking but ... still kind of does it. Any thoughts?

    Paul
     
  13. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Have you tried a different collet? Ever changed the liner?
     
  14. paco
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 1,138

    paco
    Member
    from Atlanta

    Never changed the liner but maybe has only a couple hours use overall. I tig weld everything ... Yes ... have changed collet recently along with new tip. I use it ONLY when doing sheetmetal reapairs ... trans tunnels, tacking for fitment, etc.

    I use .035 wire & haven't even gone through a complete spool since I've owned it.
     
  15. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Light use doesn't mean the liner isn't bad. Troubleshooting machines is always funny...so many things it could be.

    The fact that it sets so long between uses could be problematic. Wire oxidizes, which can cause use issues.

    I usually don't mig at much less than 25lbs anyways. Tig you can get away with lower gas pressure, I've never felt that was the way to go with mig.
     
  16. paco
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 1,138

    paco
    Member
    from Atlanta

    OK ... so I don't feel as bad cause I was using pressure similar to my tig work.

    I'll check the quality of the spool. Perhaps it's not so good. I'll order a liner too.

    I appreciate the thoughts & suggestions. I'll MIG to see how it did when alls in.

    Again - thanks for the info & perspective.

    Paul
     
  17. CoolHand
    Joined: Aug 31, 2007
    Posts: 1,917

    CoolHand
    Alliance Vendor

    I've had wire rust/oxidize on the spool inside the machine when the machine sat unused for a long time.

    That filler wire is coated (something copper colored), so you'd think it wouldn't oxidize that easy, but nothing worked to clean that welder's output up, until I changed the spool.

    It ain't a guaranteed fix, but it's something you can check pretty quickly to eliminate it from the list of possible causes.

    Your problem is probably caused by poor gas coverage though, 'cause as you've said, it clears up when you turn the pressure up.
     
  18. paco
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 1,138

    paco
    Member
    from Atlanta

    Thanks ... I'll update ...
     
  19. Here are a couple of a tank I made for a 63 Ford custom at work.

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  20. LPRS
    Joined: Dec 28, 2008
    Posts: 115

    LPRS
    Member

    Close-up of some shock mounts I just finished

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  21. 56ih
    Joined: Mar 17, 2010
    Posts: 43

    56ih
    Member

    Some of these are great...but I wonder how well they would x-ray. There is a LOT more to a good weld than aesthetics
     
  22. fender lizard
    Joined: Jan 4, 2010
    Posts: 161

    fender lizard
    Member
    from mcallen tx

    Good looking welds come with experience and knowledge, I'm sure they have good penetration and not just aesthetic.
     
  23. S.S. flange weld on a still column. Pretty common but this is how I do them.

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  24. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 6,967

    noboD
    Member

    Hope everyone saw Josh's article in Rod and Kulture magazine. How's rehab since the surgery?
     
  25. I love when the weld-critique Nazis come out of the wood work.... go look on any production car chassis... more than a few welds will look like pure crap compared to the ones we see here.

    Bob
     
  26. Brog
    Joined: Jul 7, 2011
    Posts: 207

    Brog
    Member

    Some TIG welding of mine, not incredible though


    [​IMG]
     
  27. tfeverfred
    Joined: Nov 11, 2006
    Posts: 15,796

    tfeverfred
    Member

    Two weeks before graduating and I start work Monday. *fist pump* Read the story in my album.
     
  28. PKap
    Joined: Jan 5, 2011
    Posts: 592

    PKap
    Member
    from Alberta

    I love looking at high quality craftsmanship. You guys inspire me to keep trying to improve. The more I do, the more I am amazed at what the guys accomplished decades ago with the equipment they had. My grandfather used to weld train car hitches with two Arc welders running to one cable using 1/2" steel rod and no flux but some sort of a shielding gas nozzle blowing in it. He also did a lot of work on ship drive propellers and pressure tanks. It would bother him if he had a single pin hole when testing. Amazingly, most tanks had over 50' of weld, and it all looked consistent and even, rivalling most of the tig welding seen today.


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  29. Nice job, Brog!
     
  30. Brog
    Joined: Jul 7, 2011
    Posts: 207

    Brog
    Member

    Thanks Gary, another one, still not incredible and have a long ways to go

    [​IMG]
     

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