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Incredible welds

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by rusty f100, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. Cali4niaCruiser
    Joined: Aug 30, 2005
    Posts: 490

    Cali4niaCruiser
    Member

    Not going to win any awards but something I'm proud of for only pipe welding a few days a month. 16" 5P Downhill
    [​IMG]
     
  2. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Nice work guys. Mark, that Al is sexy.

    Here's more free hand practice.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/browndogwelding/8289086977/" title="Izthistaken came over to shoot some welding pics tonight. This is what I was messing around with while he played with the camera. Free hand. by Brown Dog Welding, on Flickr">[​IMG]</a>
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 1, 2014
  3. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Figured I'd work on my off hand, this one was lefty:

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/browndogwelding/8315259156/" title="&quot;But can you do it with your left hand?&quot; #goingbackwards #leftyforaday by Brown Dog Welding, on Flickr">[​IMG]</a>

    plain old righty

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/browndogwelding/8311701042/" title="Weld away the winter blues.... by Brown Dog Welding, on Flickr">[​IMG]</a>
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 1, 2014
  4. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    This one was free hand:

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/browndogwelding/8350422127/" title="Some #weldporn for the weekend. Freehand. Just trying to stay warm! by Brown Dog Welding, on Flickr">[​IMG]</a>
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 1, 2014
  5. raidmagic
    Joined: Dec 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,438

    raidmagic
    Member

  6. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Walking the cup is a welding technique often used when weaving a larger pass on pipe or fillets. The cup rests on the work. I did that free hand, without letting the cup test the work. Different situations call for different techniques.
     
  7. raidmagic
    Joined: Dec 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,438

    raidmagic
    Member

    So at the risk of sounding stupid, you use a cup to rest your hand on to keep the proper distance from your work, right? I'm a novice welder with a mig, I've never tiged.
     
  8. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    The cup is part of the TIG torch. It's porcelain, so you can rest an edge on the work.
     
  9. Joy550
    Joined: Jan 6, 2013
    Posts: 9

    Joy550
    Member
    from usa

    Incredible for all the wrong reasons.[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  10. ctfordguy
    Joined: Mar 17, 2011
    Posts: 98

    ctfordguy
    Member

    Spent several hours practicing my TIG welding this afternoon on 18g. Simple butt welds.
    After seeing these welds I think I'm going to put my unit to good use tomorrow. I'm going to weld the door to my garage shut.
    You guys are making me sick to my stomach !!
    Bruce/CT
     
  11. bonez
    Joined: Jul 16, 2007
    Posts: 3,493

    bonez
    Member
    from Slow lane

    For you pros. Is it normal that welding courses are about 30 hours give or take??
    Im thinkin of gettin into it professionaly, but its hard to find a good school over here (italy) and the fact that its 4/5 days courses is sort of a put down. I mean, i weld since '05, but im sure being self-thought means tons of bad habits to fix. Maybe not, but since it aint free....
    whatcha say?
     
  12. raidmagic
    Joined: Dec 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,438

    raidmagic
    Member

    Thanks for explaining that to me.
     
  13. Tony8620
    Joined: Jan 14, 2013
    Posts: 1

    Tony8620
    Member
    from Chicago

    Hey guys, I'm new on here. I just wanted to show a little bit of my work.
     

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  14. paco
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 1,141

    paco
    Member
    from Atlanta

    And nice work it is Tony.

    Keep us posted with some updates.
     
  15. c-10 simplex
    Joined: Aug 24, 2009
    Posts: 1,330

    c-10 simplex
    Member

    Explain pulsing in great detail. And, is it necessary?
     
  16. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member



    Not sure I've got time for "great detail". Some machines have settings where you can adjust an arc's low amp, high amp, the duration it stays at each extreme, and how many times it cycles through those extremes per second. This way you can keep a consistent arc, but decrease overall heat input. In some cases, like with stainless steel, the pulsing can agitate the puddle as well...which settles the weld pool and brings contaminates to the "top" and out of the weld. On newer inverter machines you can set the pulse to cycle well into the triple digits, and when you weld it really doesn't effect your rhythm.

    Is it necessary? No. All the welders I use have the capability, but I rarely use it. If I'm working with thin ss I might, but other than that I typically don't.

    If you're "pulsing" the foot pedal, that's a bit different. You're just manipulating the heat input manually. It can be done, skillfully, but you've got to have a good grasp of what's going on in the puddle.

    People that throw the term around tend to think it's some kind of magic bullet that shoots stacks of dimes. It's not. The ratio of it's usefullness to the average guy compared to the average guy's fascination with it is pretty distorted.

    This is in regards to TIG welding. I do a lot of pulse MIG, it's a bit different.
     
  17. iammarvin
    Joined: Oct 7, 2009
    Posts: 1,197

    iammarvin
    BANNED
    from Tulare, Ca

    j, when I tig, I can barely control my breathing, ad filler, watch the puddle, least of all pulse my foot controller. No pulse for me, I try to keep the weld clean and tight.
    Sorry, the pics suck.
     

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  18. Minewithnoshine
    Joined: May 17, 2007
    Posts: 938

    Minewithnoshine
    Member

    I know this may be a vague question or comment, but at my shop I have a Miller Diversion 165, not a bad little machine, I used to have a Lincoln Squarewave Pro before we got robbed last summer. I'm just not as happy with the Diversion as I was with the squarewave. The Squarewave would lay much smoother beads, even though both machines only have amp control. I fell in love with a Dynasty I had a chance to use a few months ago, I was able to lay beads that looked like they were done by a robot. Obviously there is much more you are able to control with the Dynasty, and hopefully I can eventually pick one up. I'd like to get a machine where I can control more settings to dial in a perfect weld, but I need to study up on setting up, is there any sources online to read up on the settings, or guidlines to really go by?
     
  19. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Both Lincoln and Miller have a lot of resources on their respective web sites.
     
  20. jesse1980
    Joined: Aug 25, 2010
    Posts: 1,355

    jesse1980
    Member

    Lot of nice welds. You guys all using mig?
     
  21. WelderSeries
    Joined: Sep 20, 2007
    Posts: 762

    WelderSeries
    Alliance Vendor

    lol
    Can you graph that please?

    I don't think I've ever used the auto pulse feature. Maybe that's a way to differentiate between the two: auto pulse vs. manual pulse?

    Welder pick-up line: I only manual pulse, baby. No need for coins in the bed.
     

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  22. c-10 simplex
    Joined: Aug 24, 2009
    Posts: 1,330

    c-10 simplex
    Member

    Thank you.

    So, basically electronic pulsing is really unnecessary unless for very thin sheet metal?

    b) i was getting the term pulsing confused with using the pedal to pulse, which i did a little in school---because the instructor wanted us to on aluminum (not sure why).

    Btw, i'm not gay (not that there is anything wrong with that) but i kind of look up to you as a welder and person and i think i love you (in a platonic way). i hope i have not creeped you out.

    b) i have not slept really well in the past few days which may explain my unabashed outflow of emotions. (sort of like being drunk, not that i get drunk often)

    Thanks again.
     
  23. WelderSeries
    Joined: Sep 20, 2007
    Posts: 762

    WelderSeries
    Alliance Vendor

    I, too, love you Josh.
     
  24. crazyeyes
    Joined: Dec 2, 2005
    Posts: 31

    crazyeyes
    Member
    from AZ

    So... I'm new here ans I'm glad I stumbled across this thread. I have been welding awhile for hobby and am about to make the jump to do it as my second career. Currently getting my 3G and 4G certs with 7018. Also working on my TIG skills.

    Here is one I did with OXY/Acetylene T Joint thin sheet (not sure of actual thickness)

    [​IMG]

    and some practice on my "keyhole" open V.. you can see the progression.. solid 3 hours, 3 passes ea. still not where I want to be.

    [​IMG]

    I'll post more as it goes on...

    Mike
     
  25. Kevin Lee
    Joined: Nov 12, 2001
    Posts: 7,410

    Kevin Lee
    Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    So, with freehand versus walking is it a bragging rights thing? I see welds that look great either way.

    I do see the witness marks sometimes on pieces that someone has "walked" on, but the weld itself seems to look just as nice.

    If it's bragging rights I fully get it. I would be bragging as well.
     
  26. WelderSeries
    Joined: Sep 20, 2007
    Posts: 762

    WelderSeries
    Alliance Vendor

    I was totally joking about the manual pulse thing- didn't mean any disrespect at all. Controlling the heat on auto pulse is the main deal, from my perspective. It's easy to let the heat affected zone go wild by the end of the weld if you just peg the amps and let the pulse max out every time. With manual pulse (and auto pulse with manual amp control), you can effectively reduce the amps towards the end of the weld and keep the material temp constant, which prevents burning through at the end of the weld.
     
  27. c-10 simplex
    Joined: Aug 24, 2009
    Posts: 1,330

    c-10 simplex
    Member

    P.S. One reason why i was asking about pulsing is because i'm looking at, say a miller dynasty 200: The SD base model doesn't(?) have pulsing while the DX model does, but the price difference could be $300-$500 between the two.....
     
  28. c-10 simplex
    Joined: Aug 24, 2009
    Posts: 1,330

    c-10 simplex
    Member

    Good job, Keep going.

    And don't be afraid or ashamed to love another man.

    a) i'm am generally referring to platonically.

    b) But if further----romantically or other wise there is nothing wrong with that either.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2013
  29. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    You guys got me cracking up:D


    As far as bragging rights....there ARE certain certs that don't allow you to touch the cup to the work piece. I've never run into them, but they exist. So there is a reason to know how to do that. But honestly, this is just me challenging myself. I don't have much use in my particular line of work for walking the cup either...but I enjoy it. Then I do something and someone says "yeah, but can you do it free hand?" ...so I try it. Then someone says "well that's ok, but can you do it left handed?" ....so I try it. And all in all, it translates to other techniques and other forms of welding too. Watching the puddle, controlling your torch and the heat, being able to work lefty or righty, it's stuff every weldor should work on anyways.
     

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