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Incredible welds

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by rusty f100, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. bonez
    Joined: Jul 16, 2007
    Posts: 3,493

    bonez
    Member
    from Slow lane


    175 psi, i need to hide the air tank of my bag set up under the rear seat, here its illegal to have adjustable suspension and risked to have the car inpounded once already.
    I need a small tank, and because im making a step notch i thought of incorporating a small diameter tank into the design as the smaller 2 or 3 gallon tanks available are too bulky and would be kinda of an hassle to fit.

    As for open root welding i did a search and no i never did, althought i usually bevel both joints to get better penetration, but usually if i leave a gap and make a root pass its not in the same way as in pipe weldin.
    I could even use my old stick welder if you think its better, i used to be quite good at it, plus i have a 100pk of electrodes that is just sittin there so i might as well put it to good practice use.

    I'll do some test panels, or tubing sections then picture them and post'em.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2011
  2. hartmen
    Joined: Feb 6, 2011
    Posts: 142

    hartmen
    BANNED

    i got a new machine at work. dynasty 300 dx

    after setting up the machine most of the white cloud is gone now. less than 1/8icnh all around it. tried adjusting the machine to the best of my knowledge and that is as good as i can get it. running 50/50 gas
     
  3. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Anybody got change?

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 1, 2014
  4. Graham M
    Joined: Apr 17, 2011
    Posts: 406

    Graham M
    Member
    from Calgary AB

    ^ Holy fuck there is some serious talent on this forum... Im honestly speechless with some of you guys. (Are you sure you weren't a surgeon in a past life? thats the most consistent heat & beading I've seen in a long time)

    I was about to post some amazing pics of my neighbors twin turbo Mustang build that he did, but nothing would stand out from the norm here.

    My hats off to you HAMB guys, seriously.
     
  5. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Someone asked the other day to see some thin stuff, this was the thinnest I could dig up at the time. .055. I need to get in for some glasses, I have a hard time seeing the puddle at this size...

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  6. chaos10meter
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 2,191

    chaos10meter
    Member
    from PA.

    My kid always said my mig welds look like Helen Keller did them.
    I don't know if that's a complement or not ?
     
  7. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,191

    Mart
    Member

    I managed to do some incredibly crap welds the other day, does that count??

    Mart.
     
  8. like a stack of nickels that fell to the side..........................BEAUTIFUL..They look like aircraft automated machine welds.
     
  9. captainjunk#2
    Joined: Mar 13, 2008
    Posts: 4,374

    captainjunk#2
    Member

    jdustu that really is an incredible weld , id need a magnifying lense to see the puddle , great weld ,
     
  10. goose-em
    Joined: Aug 23, 2008
    Posts: 349

    goose-em
    Member
    from Louisiana

    Usinng 50-50 Helium Argon is great when you are welding thicker materials. Helium increases the heat input. When welding thin aluminum use 100% argon or 90 - 10 Argon Helium (I prefer 100% argon)

    The white stuff is a byproduct of the cleaning action of using AC. You will always have it and it is not a bad thing. It is do to the oxide that is present in all aluminum even after thorough cleaning.

    The oxide layer on aluminum forms in milliseconds, so even after a good cleaning it comes back immediately in a thin layer, think .0001 micrometers but it is still there, it will get thicker the longer it sits. 6061 will for oxide very fast.

    MIL-STD 248 requires that welding be performed within 8 hours of cleaning, sometimes 4 depending on the alloy. At our shop we weld within 6 or 7 minutes of cleaning.

    Best semi mechanical cleaning process is a red scotchbrite on a grinder followed by a wipe with denatured alcohol.

    You can also chemically clean sodium hydroxide, followed by and acid wash followed by a baking soda rinse followed by a clean water rinse but it is messy and a pain.


    Here is one of our butt welds on 5083 H111
     

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  11. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

  12. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,191

    Mart
    Member

    I can offer one tip to welders that like me are getting older. Glasses. I have a prescription for reading glasses at +1.0. I bought some glasses at the supermarket at +2.5 or something like that, basically much stronger than my normal prescription. I attached them to my gas welding goggles (on the outside - works ok) and it really helped me re-learning my gas welding. It allows me to really concentrate on the weld puddle and react to what is going on. New goggles can make a big difference, too. If you can't see clearly you will not get a good result.

    Mart.
     
  13. Gigantor
    Joined: Jul 12, 2006
    Posts: 3,819

    Gigantor
    Member

    I just finished a welding course at my local trade school and feel a lot better about my welding abilities than I did before... a lot of the stuff on this site is pure art but it doesn't seem as far out of reach as it did just a few months ago.
    One thing I know is that I need a tig welder. The stick is great for brute force and you can still get some pretty welds. The mig is downright handy and easy to use. But the tig... that is just clean, precise, and unforgiving as hell.

    This thread is inspiring to say the least... Guess I need to squirrel away my acorns to pay for the Welding II class next fall as I obviously still have a lot to learn.
     
  14. jdustu
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 726

    jdustu
    Member

    Yeah, keeping a clean shield helps. I've got pretty bad double vision, and I'm nearsighted...which means I can't see shit close up or far away :D

    Definitely need to get in for some glasses again. Guys are trying to convince me to get laser surgery, but even though I've heard nothing but good things the idea scares the crap out of me.
     
  15. hartmen
    Joined: Feb 6, 2011
    Posts: 142

    hartmen
    BANNED

    that is exactly what im doing now. lol. wish i could post more pictures guys. camera is sick. anyways...there is alot of sick looking welds. i wish my camera was ok i would post some of mirrored s.s. the welds look freakin awesome agaisnt the mirrored finish.
     
  16. 392_hemi
    Joined: Jun 16, 2004
    Posts: 1,737

    392_hemi
    Member

    Cheater lenses inside the welding helmet are a lot more convenient than reading glasses. Problem is, if you have one of those fancy helmets with the big window, the magnifiers only cover about half. But I have to say, my welds are 10x better now that I can actually see what I'm doing. Laser surgery doesn't help for the close up stuff, unless you do one eye for near and one for distance. But that screws up your depth perception. I got lasik about 5 or 6 years ago, and now I'm just about ready for reading glasses. I definitely need something for my welding as low light is when you really notice it.
     
  17. noboD
    Joined: Jan 29, 2004
    Posts: 7,288

    noboD
    Member

    I understand some people that have had lasic have trouble with night vision too.
     
  18. 1320 Speed & Kustom
    Joined: Jun 11, 2011
    Posts: 2

    1320 Speed & Kustom
    Member
    from Virginia

    Welds by 1320 Speed & Kustom ... Thanks for looking!
     

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  19. mysteryman
    Joined: Apr 20, 2011
    Posts: 252

    mysteryman
    Member
    from atlanta

    that looks good we have a lincoln mig welder with all accesories to weld alluminum but never tried always tig instead.might give it a try now
     
  20. So, guys, what is the best lighting for welding?
    I have trouble seeing what I am doing for the most part.
    Results in crappy welding.
    Outside seems better but I can't drag everything outside.
     
  21. 392_hemi
    Joined: Jun 16, 2004
    Posts: 1,737

    392_hemi
    Member

    I use a portable shop lamp and put it as close as possible to what I'm working on. I also try to limit the amount of light coming into the back side of my hood as that really makes it difficutl to see what I'm doing.
     

  22. Make sure ya lense's and covers are nice and clean Clive, mig welding is usually good for discolouring them. What amps are you running , and what shade is your helmet set to ?

    Shrappy :cool:
     
  23. Docco
    Joined: Mar 23, 2007
    Posts: 286

    Docco
    Member
    from Ippy

    How do you find the strength of the mig welds?
    I know it looks good but to me i just think the weld would be weaker when you overlap spot welds with a mig welder allowing the weld to slightly cool between spots and not be as stronger as a straight run.
    Do i make sense? anyone else have an opinion.
     

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  24. bonez
    Joined: Jul 16, 2007
    Posts: 3,493

    bonez
    Member
    from Slow lane

    ^^ that is a seriously nice bead. its not a stitch job. btw, it wouldnt make sense on material as thick as that.
    Stitchin is for sheetmetal to avoid heat build up. whos done that btw? real nice.

    found out who did it, previous page 1320 something.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2011
  25. looks cool, but to me its not right or strong. I've seen this type of weld done on panel work,,ground down ready to bondy over,,,but light visable through the spots !!!!

    Shrapnel :cool:
     
  26. bonez
    Joined: Jul 16, 2007
    Posts: 3,493

    bonez
    Member
    from Slow lane

    ^^^ this type of weldin is for frames or thick walled steel.
    You are referin to stitchin, badly done too apparently. anybody grindin a bead on a frame is a hack. unless its a showcar that doesnt get driven.
     
  27. zman
    Joined: Apr 2, 2001
    Posts: 16,555

    zman
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Garner, NC


    that is absolutely for looks only, not strength, see the little dimple in the middle of each puddle, he's pulsing his MIG instead of a good consistant bead, I am against this on any sort of structural weld.
     
  28. ty1295
    Joined: Feb 20, 2008
    Posts: 109

    ty1295
    Member
    from Indiana

    I see this done in aluminum also, the beads look good but you can clearly see its a series of weld "dots" stacked on top of each other. Kindof bugs me because everybody thinks its an awesome weld.
     
  29. JimC
    Joined: Dec 13, 2002
    Posts: 2,232

    JimC
    Member
    from W.C.,Mo.

    Any weld better than this would be on the Arch in St Louis,Mo!
     

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