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I'm to cheap to buy the gas tank I want - hammerform

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by hillbilly4008, May 10, 2013.

  1. low-n-slo54
    Joined: Jul 25, 2009
    Posts: 1,920

    low-n-slo54
    Member

    I think it's cool! Just goes to show how easy it can be for a novice, like myself, to make something that they can call their own. I dig it! Thanks for the post.
     
  2. hillbilly4008
    Joined: Feb 13, 2009
    Posts: 2,917

    hillbilly4008
    Member
    from Rome NY

    OMG! He's painting it with oil base paint and a brush!:eek: Why would he do such a thing?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Been wanting to try this for a while now too.
    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=700921&highlight=brush

    Well I'm going to call the tank done for now. I'll let the paint cure for a few days, then add the Red-Kote gas tank liner that NAPA sells for $40.

    Incase anyone was wondering what this tank is going in here is a link to my Av8 jalopy build.
    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=704931

    Hooray for tech week!
     
  3. rustednutz
    Joined: Nov 20, 2010
    Posts: 1,580

    rustednutz
    Member
    from tulsa, ok

    I may just have to try this for my 31 coupe. Thanks for sharing your ideas.
     
  4. trbomax
    Joined: Apr 19, 2012
    Posts: 289

    trbomax
    Member

    I think its a nice tank. The brazeing is fine,if thats how you want to do it. I would have gas welded it,but more importantly I would not have put a draw line in the bottom.I would have standpiped a fitting in the top for the draw,and standpiped the filler neck about 3/4 of the way down into the tank to prevent splashing at the cap. Maybe its just my longtime background with marine designs,but a fitting in the bottom of a tank is not only a leak waiting to happen,but also a clog point. A standpipe left 1/2" above the bottom would have been my choice. Also a gauge flange,or a gauge in the tank.
     
  5. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,199

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    The other concern with a bottom feed fuel line is if you snag it or get into an accident and break the line the whole tank will drain.




    Ago
     
  6. trbomax
    Joined: Apr 19, 2012
    Posts: 289

    trbomax
    Member

    ^^that too^^
     
  7. Catdaddyo
    Joined: Mar 9, 2005
    Posts: 136

    Catdaddyo
    Member

     
  8. Lowrders
    Joined: Sep 10, 2009
    Posts: 303

    Lowrders
    Member
    from DUBUQUE IA

    Glad to see you got off your ass and built something for tech week. Unlike me, who has no room for Criticism, because I didn't build jack shit.
    Don't mind the haters.. Haters goina hate! Nice job.
     
  9. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    Yea, I wouldn't consider well thought out, reasonable, sound advice from guys with more experience, I'd just write them off as "haters":rolleyes:...Oh wait...Yea, thats right, I do that every day, thats why I'm on the HAMB, and thats how I learn shit.
    By the way OP, I liked this thread, got a couple things from your posts, as well as learning a few things from the "haters":rolleyes:. Especially liked the emasculated shovel handle, I have a few broken handles in the shed, never thought of making chasing tools from them, great idea.
     
  10. 54Buick48D
    Joined: Jan 25, 2013
    Posts: 208

    54Buick48D
    Member
    from Maryland

    Between you, me and the lamp post...cool tank.
     
  11. hillbilly4008
    Joined: Feb 13, 2009
    Posts: 2,917

    hillbilly4008
    Member
    from Rome NY

    Thats how Henry made 'em!

    Honestly, I've never seen this style tank mounted under a vehicle. Any Model A I've seen with these tanks run them in the trunk. The guys who run em in there modifieds put them up high above the rear crossmember. Most likely won't get snagged. Jeeps right up into the '60s had fuel lines running from the bottom of the tanks then out under the floors to the fuel pumps, and those were made for off road abuse.

    Still can't argue with the fact that IF a fuel line ruptured at the tank it will drain empty. Ya got me there.

    Oh yeah, Henry didn't put sending units in the T either. The 'ol stick gauge never let me down.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2013
  12. Hester
    Joined: Jan 15, 2008
    Posts: 82

    Hester
    Member

    The only place you meet more dickheads than HAMB tech week is at a boat ramp. Fuck off.
     
    T-DeWitt likes this.
  13. Hahaha!
     
  14. I dig it...and I get it. When can you get started on mine? :D
     
  15. Atwater Mike
    Joined: May 31, 2002
    Posts: 10,347

    Atwater Mike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I understood the purpose for the project. I just would have prepped everything a little further...
    But hillbilly demonstrated some basics here...like 'rolling' the ends over a buck:
    We did this in high school, out of copper.- But never cold rolled steel.
    A lot of us will try this now, 'Billy paved the way.
    Yeah, the bucks should have been steel; but the hardwood was there to be used, and use it he did.
    Another lesson learned.
    I liked the suggestion of a brake rotor as a 'pattern buck'...likewise, the Male dil-shovel handle.
    As for the recommendation of bead rolling the X's...well, goes unsaid.

    Point being: A 'T' tank CAN be made, the final 'polish' is up to the MFR.

    Thanks, Hillbilly...
     
  16. AZbent
    Joined: Nov 26, 2011
    Posts: 272

    AZbent
    Member

    There are enough ideas that all of us could use them and build something. Only if we would get some courage and do it.
    Mark
     
  17. mustangsix
    Joined: Mar 7, 2005
    Posts: 1,297

    mustangsix
    Member

    Looks perfectly usable, but the one concern I would have is the tiny baffle on that long skinny tank. The fuel is going to run to one end or the other on any prolonged turn. Your engine could run our of fuel while negotiating a highway on-ramp. One more of your end plates mounted in the center with some holes at the bottom would have been better.

    Overall, I like it and wouldn't hesitate to give it a try. Thanks.
     
  18. firingorder1
    Joined: Dec 15, 2006
    Posts: 2,147

    firingorder1
    Member

    Congrats on making a tank rather than buying one "made in China" and coming on here saying it didn't bolt straight in. We all have different skill levels and yours is pretty good. Not sure I could do that. Like you said you didn't think there would be much interest in a thread about you buying a tank. Let the moaners moan and the haters hate. They're the ones that keep the Chinese shit pouring into this country. Good job!!!
     
  19. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 4,037

    indyjps
    Member

    Hillbilly, you're funny. I take back any critical comments I made, that tank looks good painted.
     
  20. raidmagic
    Joined: Dec 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,438

    raidmagic
    Member

    Hey Hillbilly, that's bad ass!! Nice work.
     
  21. hillbilly4008
    Joined: Feb 13, 2009
    Posts: 2,917

    hillbilly4008
    Member
    from Rome NY

    Thanks guys. My goal was to do a tech thread that anyone could do in their own garage with minimal tooling, and in a way that could have been done decades ago. I'm happy with the outcome, and will have no problem rockin' that tank when the time comes.
     
  22. SJR
    Joined: Feb 17, 2011
    Posts: 126

    SJR
    Member

    Thanks for sharin, Ill be makin one for the T in the future, looks way better then the plastic tanks Im seein in new cars, when buying sheetmetal is there different options? or is it just mild steel? and whats the kind to buy?
     
  23. Funny how everybody is all traditional here, and then when someone makes a part that was made similar to how it was back in the day, it's not perfect enough. People there was lots of stuff done like this back in the day. If you want perfect go build a street rod. It looks cool from where I'm sitting.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2013
  24. Tex_06
    Joined: Jun 15, 2012
    Posts: 15

    Tex_06
    Member

    Pics won't load but I get the idea of what went on here. Good write up, I may be trying this on my next project with aluminum simply because aluminum is easier to hammerform. Thanks!
     
  25. hillbilly4008
    Joined: Feb 13, 2009
    Posts: 2,917

    hillbilly4008
    Member
    from Rome NY

    SJR, you've got loads of options when it comes to what materials you want to use. Such as; mild steel(hot roll or cold roll), aluminum, stainless steel, brass, copper, and galvanized steel.

    milwscruffy, you definitely get it! thank you!
     
  26. silent rick
    Joined: Nov 7, 2002
    Posts: 4,126

    silent rick
    Member

    being in the hvac industry, i have access to a ton of 24gauge galvanized. do you think that would be too light? i can even pittsburgh the edges and maybe solder those joints.
     
  27. hillbilly4008
    Joined: Feb 13, 2009
    Posts: 2,917

    hillbilly4008
    Member
    from Rome NY

    seems a bit thin to me. Maybe 22ga. Don't need to go any heavier than 18ga though. I felt 20ga was a happy medium.
     
  28. EnglishBob
    Joined: Jan 19, 2008
    Posts: 1,029

    EnglishBob
    Member


    I'm stealing that line and changing it to suit.
    Priceless.
     

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