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Technical Identifying a Flathead

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by oldscl, Dec 21, 2015.

  1. oldscl
    Joined: Sep 26, 2012
    Posts: 26

    oldscl
    Member

    Hi guys,
    I am wondering if you could shed some light on this engine and it's suitability as a fit into a traditional Model A. I have just come across it as an option, as the powerplant I eventually settle on will be the deciding factor for the theme of the car.
    The seller states it is full of oil, sealed as you see and turns over easily. Also states it comes from a 1944 Ford Blitz with manual gearbox and transfer case included. From my (very quick) research, as it was during wartime, it could be anything.
    Would this sort of engine be suitable for seeing street and highway duties? I am not sure if there is a difference between military and civilian models.

    Is there anything I can look out for or inspect when it is assembled and complete like this?
    Thanks in advance from Australia.
    $_2s0.jpg

    $_20.jpg $_20d.jpg
     
  2. big duece
    Joined: Jul 28, 2008
    Posts: 6,387

    big duece
    Member
    from kansas

  3. oldscl
    Joined: Sep 26, 2012
    Posts: 26

    oldscl
    Member


    Thanks for the quick response. Gives me a direction for research. Am awaiting a call tomorrow to hopefully check it out before Christmas.
     
  4. lodaddyo
    Joined: May 5, 2002
    Posts: 1,221

    lodaddyo
    Member

    See if you can pull the heads for inspection before you buy. Look for cracks between the valve seats and cylinder walls. Does it turn over?
     

  5. kbgreen
    Joined: Jan 12, 2014
    Posts: 341

    kbgreen
    Member

    Is that the dipstick tube shown to the left of the generator? If it is extended that much, I would wonder if it is a truck engine. The truck engines have lower compression and considerably less power. I'm not sure how to verify that it is or is is not a truck engine. The distributor is also missing. What is the engine currently located in? Sort of looks like a machine application of some sort.
     
  6. kbgreen...look again,,distributor shows in my photos
     
  7. Ignore the fact it's in a truck. You can use it if it's OK, but not the gearbox. Obviously rebuild it.
     
  8. Look for a raised 59 on the upper bellhousing,indicating post war 44-48. 59 motors also had round water holes in block with heads removed(lower center) Pre 59 motors had a "keystone" shaped water hole in block.Keystone blocks (Merc-Trucks) had 3 3/16 bore and keystone blocks in cars had 3 1/16 bore. image.jpg
     
  9. big duece
    Joined: Jul 28, 2008
    Posts: 6,387

    big duece
    Member
    from kansas

    I believe the trucks have a oil pan that has a removable shield on the flywheel area. This allowed you to change flywheel and clutch without pulling the pan. The car pan would have to be removed to replace the flywheel. Didn't some of the heads have "8rt", if they were truck?
     
    oldscl likes this.
  10. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 18,037

    alchemy
    Member

    8RT would be after 1949, which this engine is not. If it's actually from the 1944 vehicle it is technically not a 59A motor. Scrape the gunk off the top of the bellhousing and look for some big numbers/letters cast into it. It has a 1942 style distributor cap on it, but that may have been changed as it's easy to do.

    No matter what the numbers may be, it would still be a fine engine for a hot rod. But as stated above, you need to pull a head (not and easy job) to check for the most common cracks. Then a complete disassembly to check for more in the pan rails. Then if no cracks are found during magnafluxing, have a pressure check done to see if there are any corrosion problems through the water jackets.
     
    oldscl likes this.
  11. big duece
    Joined: Jul 28, 2008
    Posts: 6,387

    big duece
    Member
    from kansas

    Thanks for clarifying the 8rt idea.
     
  12. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 12,307

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    I believe the 8RT was introduced with the 'new' F series trucks for the '48 model year. The passenger cars didn't get the revised V8 until the '49 models, the 8BA.

    Ray
     
  13. NotSoNewKid
    Joined: Nov 29, 2015
    Posts: 19

    NotSoNewKid
    Member

    Here's what the 59 looks like on the bellhousing.[​IMG]
     
    oldscl likes this.
  14. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    It appears to be a Canadian wartime motor. If accessories are original, 1942--end of war. Blitz probably means the Canadian built CMP cab forward trucks and gun tractors used by all imperial armies...I think their engines were 239's, and you have lucked into essentially a '42 Merc engine. Doesn't seem to have PCV or full flow filter, so pre-1943...Looking at details will settle that.
    As it is furnished, if you swap the huge fan for a smaller passenger car generator fan you will have the perfect (shortest!) flathead ensemble for fitting a Model A.
     
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  15. kbgreen
    Joined: Jan 12, 2014
    Posts: 341

    kbgreen
    Member

    Yep, top photo is very clear, you are correct.
     
  16. oldscl
    Joined: Sep 26, 2012
    Posts: 26

    oldscl
    Member

    Thankyou all so much for the feedback! I forgot about the timezone difference in replies. Will report back after discussions with the seller.
    Merry Christmas.
     
  17. Except me;)
     
  18. oldscl
    Joined: Sep 26, 2012
    Posts: 26

    oldscl
    Member

    Yes, you're just up early making the rest of us Aussies look slack :)
     

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